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Thread: Wilkinson Sword Characteristics

  1. #126
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    Just for interest. Here is a page from a Very early Wilkinson blade rub book (just discovered by me with others amongst old factory 'junk'(Tea Chest actually under Garden Tool reps reports, old catalogues etc.

    This page dates from 1867/9 period
    Enjoy!
    Robert
    PS I am indexing and cataloging what is there (Period covered 1847-1914 and beyond)
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  2. #127
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    Another Gem!!!!

    This may well help us understand the various blade lengths of Wilkinson blades and the term 'Medium' etc.

    This is Wilkinsons 'Measuring Stand'! I can see the use in fitting the correct sword slings to see where the chape of the scabbard lies and also as said above, for measuring officers to recommend their 'perfect' blade length!
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  3. #128
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    that's interesting... Does that thing still exist somewhere?
    mark@swordforum.com

    ~ Hostem Hastarum Cuspidibus Salutemus ~

    "Those who beat their swords into plowshares usually end up plowing for those who don't."
    Benjamin Franklin

  4. #129
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mark McMorrow View Post
    that's interesting... Does that thing still exist somewhere?
    Long Gone I am afraid!

  5. #130
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    Standard pattern for Rifles Hilts 1878


  6. #131
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    garden shears

    Quote Originally Posted by John Hart View Post
    Been meaning to post this for a while - a pair of Wilkinson garden shears seen in an eBay auction in Australia. Sorry for the picture quality, but notice the proof disk to the right of the pivot nut? Never seen that on garden implements before!

    If I had to stick my neck out, I'd say these could well have been carried into action by a member of Gardener's Horse...

    John
    I have a pair of garden shears that i bought in the early seventies..they were labeled wilkinson sword..ie label not stamped..& on the back end of the nut fitting..PATd. and REG.d. Des
    W435.

  7. #132
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    Let's have No More Talk of TOP NUTS!!

    LETS HAVE NO MORE TALK OF TOP NUTS

    Came across an Old notebook from about 1870's with some descriptions of sword parts written inside the front cover. Obviously belonged to a Fitter or bench Hand at either Wilkinson or Mole.

    The 'Proper' word for what we call a Top Nut today is..............................

    TITLE
    or
    PIVOT

    UNDERNUT is nut holding grip

    TANG is an extension of the blade through the grip

    TOP & MIDDLE LOCKETS are the mounts of the top and middle of a scabbard for suspension

    CHAPE is the bottom mount or END of a scabbard.


    So in future if you wish an answer refer to the'Top nut' as either a Title or Pivot !!!!!!!!!!!!!!! (Only joking!)

  8. #133
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    I think when we are discussing antique swords the proper terminology should apply, if we don't use it, we lose it!
    When in the military, they were very particular in regards to terminology with weapon parts, a breech block and a bolt were two different parts that performed mostly the same function but with some differences. Several parts had a different name than what the Americans named them, going back to Canadas' British roots.
    Of course this military type of thinking may not apply here! I just think original terms used for original swords is something worth holding on to.

  9. #134

    Wilkinson Venezuelan contract?

    Dear sirs

    Of course I'm new to the forum, not a sword collector or the like, but my father and his father were Venezuelan Navy Officers, father served in the navy from 1923 to 1961 and grandfather 1890 to 1926. My father died 25 years ago. The issue is that among my fathers belongings I found 3 swords, two of them with Venezuelan Navy Markings and another "mysterious one" with the following characteristics: I believe is a Wilkinson Navy Officer Sword from the numerous pictures I have seen in the internet, the only difference would be that there is no crown over the anchor in the "hilt". It has a "yellow" mark inside a six point star that says "PROVED" over a "Fleur de Lys" and it has the serial number 6927. If this is a Wilkinson, the serial would correspond to year 1855 according to what they told me...Any thoughts, the swords without crowns were for export? Have you heard of swords going to Venezuela?
    Thanks very much for any info you could provide!
    Ramon Rivero
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  10. #135
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    I am afraid this is Not a Wilkinson and the number not a Wilkinson number.

    The sword is the type that was used by the Argentine Navy in the late Victorian period.

    Hope that helps.
    Robert

  11. #136
    Thanks Robert any suggestions on where to find mor information?
    Regards
    Ramon

  12. #137
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ramon Rivero View Post
    Thanks Robert any suggestions on where to find mor information?
    Regards
    Ramon
    Let me see what I can find about this type of sword.
    Robert

    here are some photos from the Wilkinson Catalogue for Non British swords about 1920.
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    Last edited by Robert Wilkinson-Latham; 04-02-2011 at 12:28 AM.

  13. #138
    Thanks Robert I appreciate this
    Ramon.

  14. #139
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    Forging a Royal Artillery sword blade - The various steps in the manufacture from billet to polished and etched blade ready for mounting.

    Thought this might interest as we all talk so much about swords and blades!!!
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  15. #140
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    Here are a couple of interesting etches from the master Etch plates:
    1 - Canadian Military College
    2- Army Medical Corps
    At first I thought this is an odd one as the officer and OR's were joined together in 1898 as the Royal Army medical Corps. However, the maple leaves round the 'snake' badge pointed to Canada and the Canadian Medical Corps.
    (In 1899 Colonel Neilson drafted an all-important Order in Council, which was duly promulgated. Authority was granted by this for the formation of an Army Medical Corps consisting of six bearer companies and six field hospitals.)



    An interesting aside for Sword Collectors is that Because Army 'medics' are not a fighting arm, under the Geneva Conventions, members may only use their weapons for self-defence. For this reason, there are two traditions that they perform when on parade:

    Officers do not draw their swords - instead they hold their scabbard with their left hand while saluting with their right.

    Other Ranks do not fix bayonets.
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    Last edited by Robert Wilkinson-Latham; 07-16-2011 at 12:45 AM.

  16. #141
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    Quote Originally Posted by Robert Wilkinson-Latham View Post
    An interesting aside for Sword Collectors is that Because Army 'medics' are not a fighting arm, under the Geneva Conventions, members may only use their weapons for self-defence.
    Indeed, and one particular member of the RAMC (or strictly speaking the Indian Medical Service) earned a VC for doing just that!

    John Crimmin, Surgeon, Bombay Medical Service.
    Lieut Tighe, 27th Bombay Infantry (to mounted infantry of which corps
    Surgeon Crimmin was attached), states that in the action near Lwekaw,
    Eastern Karenni, on the 1st Jan 1889, four men charged with him
    into the midst of a large body of the enemy who were moving off from
    the Karen left flank, and two men fell to the ground wounded. He
    saw Surgeon Crimmin attending one of the men about two hundred
    yards to the rear. Karens were round the party in every direction, and
    he saw several fire at Surgeon Crimmin and the wounded man. A
    Sepoy then galloped up to Surgeon Crimmin, and the latter joined
    the fighting line, which then came up.

    Lieut Tighe further states that very shortly afterwards they were engaged
    in driving the enemy from small clumps of trees and bamboo, in which
    the Karens took shelter. Near one of these clumps he saw Surgeon Crimmin
    attending a wounded man. Several Karens rushed out at him. Surgeon
    Crimmin thrust his sword through one of them and attacked a
    second; a third Karen then dropped from the fire of a Sepoy. The remaining
    Karens fled.


    (London Gazette, 17 September 1889)

    John
    "If I can't be a good example to others, at least let me be a horrible warning".

  17. #142
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    Here are a couple of interesting bits and pieces from the Boy's Playbook of Science 2nd Edition 1860 by John Henry Pepper
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  18. #143
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    Wilkinson Customer Service

    This letter from 1909 shows the real extent of Wilkinsons famous Customer Service.

    order a Razor strop and then add, can you get me a postcard of Potters Bar?

    As the customer was in Tonga, maybe he was homesick?
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    Last edited by Robert Wilkinson-Latham; 07-28-2011 at 01:37 PM.

  19. #144
    Robert,
    When did Wilkinson begin using the hexagonal proof disc?



    I would guess some time after 1900 as two of my P1897s (both Patent Solid Hilts) have different shaped discs. One dating to 1898 has the circular disc and one dating to 1906 has a hexagonal disc.

    Thank you!

    Jonathan

  20. #145
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    I have a note of my late Father that states that the hexagonal proof disk was used from 1905 for 'Best' swords only.

    (It may have been used earlier but I will check this out)

  21. #146
    Thank you, Robert!

  22. #147
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    Wilkinson Roman Gladius?

    Hello Robert,

    I wasn't sure whether to put this as a new thread or just leave it under the Wilkinson thread .. but who/why/when was then Roman Gladius (plate 5; Swords in Colour 1976) made? Quality looks very good of course .. what were the materials .. where is it now?

    Kind regards,

  23. #148
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    Hello Peter,
    Two copies of this Roman Gladius were made. One was sold and the other sat in the Museum. It certainly disappeared long before the Museum closed in 2005 as it does not feature on the Disposal/Loan/Sale list prepared nor on the CD of every individual item in the Museum at the time, both of which I have.

    It was not sold at Bonhams so probably sold in the late 1990's as it was there in 1998.

    The materials were steel blade, wood scabbard covered and gilt brass mounts. Grip was I think composite. I have a Wilkinson Photo and by checking the Index of the negatives (I have this collection) Negative Number 1754 was taken on 30th April 1973 so shortly after the swords were made.
    Hope this helps
    Robert
    Hope that helps.

  24. #149
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    Quote Originally Posted by Robert Wilkinson-Latham View Post
    Here are a couple of interesting bits and pieces from the Boy's Playbook of Science 2nd Edition 1860 by John Henry Pepper
    This is great, Robert. For anybody wanting to read the whole book, it is here:
    http://books.google.com/books?id=j2U...page&q&f=false

  25. #150
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    Thanks

    Quote Originally Posted by Robert Wilkinson-Latham View Post
    Hello Peter,
    Two copies of this Roman Gladius were made. One was sold and the other sat in the Museum. It certainly disappeared long before the Museum closed in 2005 as it does not feature on the Disposal/Loan/Sale list prepared nor on the CD of every individual item in the Museum at the time, both of which I have.

    It was not sold at Bonhams so probably sold in the late 1990's as it was there in 1998.

    The materials were steel blade, wood scabbard covered and gilt brass mounts. Grip was I think composite. I have a Wilkinson Photo and by checking the Index of the negatives (I have this collection) Negative Number 1754 was taken on 30th April 1973 so shortly after the swords were made.
    Hope this helps
    Robert
    Hope that helps.
    thanks for this Robert. I was trying to find the message, I wasn't sure if I PM-ed it or not .. that's all very interesting. I'm not in to roman swords per se, but that one in the plate certainly captured my eye, it looks superb. It has only been in recent years with Albion Armourers that I think we see high quality copies available these days of this sort of sword.

    Kind regards,

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