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Thread: cleaning kit help

  1. #1
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    Question cleaning kit help

    hey everyone well im having a bit of a problem finding a good cleaning kit for minimal $$$. i need all the essentials. ive seen them at cheness, trueswords, and sworddemon but i was hoping that u guys could give me some suggestions as to which one i should get....i would like to stay under 20$ (USD).

    thank you,
    casey
    Last edited by Casey Sutherland; 02-04-2008 at 07:55 PM.
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  2. #2
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    Hi Casey,
    If you have a production katana, and are looking for a cleaning kit under $20, then it doesn't really matter which you get. All the inexpensive kits are from China and are pretty much the same.

    Cheers,
    Paul Smith
    "Keep the sharp side and the
    pointy end between you and
    your opponent"

  3. #3
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    I use sewing machine oil and a white cotton cloth for most of my swords. As far as disassembling a katana, a small rubber mallet and 3'' piece of dowel rod works great for removing the mekugi and tsuka removal.
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  4. #4
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    As far as disassembling a katana, a small rubber mallet and 3'' piece of dowel rod works great for removing the mekugi and tsuka removal.
    My advice is DON'T! There is no real reason to take the tsuka off of a production sword, and many reasons not to. Unless you know what you're doing it is fairly easy to either wallow out the inside of the tsuka, introducing looseness, or to induce a crack. Tsuka are actually fairly fragile, and the way they are made and installed in most production swords renders them even more fragile.

    I always advise folks to just leave the tsuka in place. It's safest that way.
    Paul Smith
    "Keep the sharp side and the
    pointy end between you and
    your opponent"

  5. #5
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    Agreed... save for Cheness

    Aye, I agree with you there... but he was mentioning purchasing a cheness... which is best to be inspected before use. A PC katana? Cold Steel? Nah, I wouldnt bother... But a Cheness... with all the threads around here about cracked tsuka-ho....

    I'd inspect it.
    Sgt Bovia
    Lcpl Twigg
    Cpl Bishop
    Lcpl Htaik
    Cpl Tate
    Lcpl Giese

    Your sacrifice will never be forgotten. Be at peace, fallen Marines.


    2/9 E Co
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  6. #6
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    There are really no essentials in any of these cheaper "cleaning kits", they are merely a novelty, nothing more, and will do your blade more harm than good for certain. A light mineral oil and clean cotton cloth are all you need. When your blade needs cleaning you can use denatured alcohol. For a production sword the 70% rubbing alcohol is fine. I would recommend denatured alcohol even over high quality uchiko, although some might disagree. Be creative, make your own box and tools and put some oil in a nice bottle and you'll have a nice, unique "kit". You might want to pick up a mekugi-nuki(brass hammer) as they are handy and just plain neat, I use one with a small dowel to remove mekugi. I also favor the smell of choji oil myself, but it is not necessary and possibly not even as good as some other alternatives, but much can be said for a bit of romance IMO.

    To sum up.....don't waste your money on a "kit", much of what's in it is unnecessary.

  7. #7
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    As far as removing the tsuka......while that might be ill advised for some of the reasons mentioned, taking a sword down, cleaning, oiling, and then reassembling it is a great deal of the charm and enjoyment in having it, so I can understand the reasoning there. Now would I enjoy doing that with a chenmess?.....well, that's another thing entirely, but at any rate, have fun and be safe.

  8. #8
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    I would recommend taking a sword apart at least ONCE, mostly to inspect it for flaws. If you have a cracked tsuka, this isn't an ignorance is bliss anecdote. Bad things can happen if the blade is not properly assembled and you don't inspect it.

    It's not necessary to keep taking it apart over and over and over again, but at least the first time can call attention to problems that need to be addressed.
    Last edited by Aaron Justice; 02-05-2008 at 10:09 PM.
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  9. #9
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    I have a cheap P pro katana, and have been taking it apart many times, and then put it together and it’s still tight. I agree with Chris. It’s really relaxing taking your time to take it apart and oil and care for it. That doesn’t mean you have to do it several times a week of course
    About the cleaning, and the use of ushiko? powder to remove old oil, I read a Japanese book that’s recommend alcohol in stead.

  10. #10
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    I cannot recommend this enough.. make one of Henry's tsuka-removal tool. I've safely removed tsuka with it that I would have thought were glued on..
    http://forums.swordforum.com/showthread.php?t=67376
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  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Timothy Shirley View Post
    Aye, I agree with you there... but he was mentioning purchasing a cheness... which is best to be inspected before use. A PC katana? Cold Steel? Nah, I wouldnt bother... But a Cheness... with all the threads around here about cracked tsuka-ho....

    I'd inspect it.
    ok lets stay away from that subject

    ...but any way i have already ordered one from true swords...nothing fancy just oil, the hammer, and the powder ball thingy. but if anyone wants to tell me how to properly use the stuff i would be happy to listen.
    Did god create man and everything around him, or did man create god and his enviroment.

    When thinking about anything one must keep an open mind, but not so open that your brain falls out

  12. #12
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    I have many cleaning kits for my swords. They are really cool, but after you know what goes into them, they are more a novelty than anything.

    For you new guys out there, there are some misknowmers about the traditional cleaning kit.

    Clove oil is just light mineral oil with clove oil added for scent.

    Uchiko is cool when seen used on TV and stuff, but in reality, uchiko can do more harm than good in the long run on custom swords as well as high to mid range production peices because it scratches the blade.

    Wanna clean the gunk off your blade without the scratching? Get some denatured alcohol from home depot and some cotton balls from a local pharmacy and that is all you need. The alcohol dries almost instantly.

    And the special paper to wipe the blade down that costs 7 or 8 dollars per sheet, well, I like it. But I bought a bunch of it. All ya really need is some clean white cotton cloth for that.

    In the end though it is just what you like and what you want to do.

    On oiling the blade, I do things just a bit differently. T prevent the oil from sticking to the inside of the saya, oil the blade and then let it sit out for a few hours. Then wipe the blade dry. I said DRY because, by that time, there will be enough oil absorbed into the steel for things to be kosher. Just a thought. Hope this is helpful.

  13. #13
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    Tom, I found that using Uchiko on my KC Bingo actually brought out the previously almost unseen hamon!
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  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Timo Qvintus View Post
    Tom, I found that using Uchiko on my KC Bingo actually brought out the previously almost unseen hamon!
    That's interesting Timo. I'd like to see some before and after pics if you have any.

  15. #15
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    I find it hard to believe that high quality uchiko could scratch a blade. I've used it for years on all my nihonto, and neither I, nor anybody else I know that uses it has ever had a problem. However, if you use the cheap stuff that comes free with your $300 sword, well, you get what you pay for. As far as the cleaning paper, I use unscented white tissue, I think that is superior to using a cloth because you're not reintroducing stuff that you've wiped off the last time you used it.

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Timo Qvintus View Post
    Tom, I found that using Uchiko on my KC Bingo actually brought out the previously almost unseen hamon!
    Was it true uchiko? The real stuff is powdered jizuya and hazuya I believe... Paul Chen just uses talcum powder.

    However, I did remove a rusty fingerprint once using the Paul Chen stuff just out of curiosity. It actually worked, and I didn't notice any change in the polish. However I wouldn't have used it on an expensive sword.
    Every time I put on a suit for a wedding or other event, I feel like I'm wearing optimal clothing for an epic fight scene...

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  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Aaron Justice View Post
    The real stuff is powdered jizuya and hazuya I believe...

    ...However, I did remove a rusty fingerprint once using the Paul Chen stuff...
    After all it is an abrasive!! If you have/want to use it I'd suggest taping the "ball" on the mune of the blade so that only the finest of powder will reach the hamon or ha of the blade a keep any scratches on this part of the blade very fine.

  18. #18
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    The uchiko I used was the cheap Chinese stuff (not PC), so I don't wonder if it's quite a bit more abrasive than the good stuff. I haven't seen a visible change in any of my other budget-swords I've used it on, though. It should be noted that the KC was in unfinished hybrid-polish by Joo-Hwan when I got it. I've tried to photograph the change in the blade but it's only visible in proper light which makes it even harder to shoot than usual. If I someday finish the polish of the KC I know what to use instead of finger-stones!

    EDIT: here we go.. the last one shows just how rough the overall polish is
    http://i182.photobucket.com/albums/x...p/KChamon3.jpg
    http://i182.photobucket.com/albums/x...p/KChamon2.jpg
    http://i182.photobucket.com/albums/x...p/KChamon1.jpg
    Last edited by Timo Qvintus; 02-09-2008 at 05:13 AM.
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