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Thread: Patina for steel?

  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2006
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    Patina for steel?

    Can anyone advise on the easiest and most effective way to apply a patina to steel (this would be for a guard on a hilt) to make it appear dusky brown or black?

    What product, where to get it, and how to apply?



    Thanks

  2. #2
    Mustard is a good base to use for a nice patina, there are a number of good threads of home projects on here is you search under patina, might want to keep it to the home projects forum to cut down results. There are a lot of methods out there.
    Mike J Arledge
    Not hear? when noise was everywhere! it tolled
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    Of all the lost adventurers my peers,--
    How such a one was strong, and such was bold,
    And such was fortunate, yet each of old
    Lost, lost! one moment knelled the woe of years.


    Robert Browning
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  3. #3
    Join Date
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    What colors or textures were you aiming for? There are many patinas that can be applied.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Deer Island, Oregon
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    170
    Here's one you can try...

    Sabi-tsuke ("to apply rust")

    10 grams - sulfur
    3 grams - copper sulfate
    10 grams - sodium chloride (table salt)
    1 liter - vinegar

    1. After degreasing, apply the solution and allow to air dry.

    2. Repeat this process until the desired color is achieved, which will be several coats.

    3. Neutralize the work for 30 minutes in a mixture of baking soda and water.

    4. Coat with wax, oil, or lacquer to seal the patina.

    I have another version of sabi-tsuke, but it calls for arsenic trisulfide which is very toxic.

    If you give this patina a try, let us know how it turns out.
    See my photos at: micknewton.smugmug.com

  5. #5
    Join Date
    May 2006
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    Los Angeles
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    i'm looking for something quick and easy. mustard would certainly qualify.

    instructions on the mustard? apply, sit, and then remove? is it just the vinegar or something else? grey poupon or yellow?

    the color isn't that important. i was thinking kind of a black steel, but brownish would be fine too.

  6. #6
    See this thread
    http://forums.swordforum.com/showthr...hlight=mustard

    Here is another example using some other easy options
    http://forums.swordforum.com/showthread.php?t=68913
    Last edited by mikejarledge; 03-12-2008 at 11:27 AM.
    Mike J Arledge
    Not hear? when noise was everywhere! it tolled
    Increasing like a bell. Names in my ears
    Of all the lost adventurers my peers,--
    How such a one was strong, and such was bold,
    And such was fortunate, yet each of old
    Lost, lost! one moment knelled the woe of years.


    Robert Browning
    --Childe Roland to the Dark Tower Came
    http://www.facebook.com/CreyrGlasLightworks

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    Roanoke,Va USA
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    1,625
    The mustard method works good for making patterns....

    I've also used Birchwood Caseys gun blue on my MRL type 2 Schiavona...here's the outcome from that route...
    Attached Images Attached Images  
    billgoodwin333@yahoo.com

    "I was born for this" - Joan of Arc

  8. #8
    Join Date
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    Location
    North Carolina
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    Here is the one I did, but it took about a week. It was a little more in depth, but looks quite impressive. It actually involved immersing it in a pool of hydrogen peroxide and salt while applying a DC current to it. (negative to the sword and positive to a seperate piece of steel in the solution. (uh oh, my secret is out).
    I then removed the leather wrap, rewrapped it with a old looking hemp cord and sealed that with epoxy.
    Finally I sealed the blade with a fine coating of wax to prevent further rusting.

    However, I suggest the mustard idea. Just slop it on the piece and let it sit. The vinegar in the mustard will etch the steel. Just make sure there is no coating on the steel like Museum Replicas does. In fact, clean it good with alcohol before doing it. Make sure to let it sit for 12 hours or so to dry. <personal experience alert> Let it sit somewhere that the smell won't be a problem. Like a garage. That mustard will STINK after sitting for that long. If you have any other issues, drop me a PM.

    Mike
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  9. #9
    Join Date
    Mar 2002
    Location
    central New Mexico
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    Firearm Blueing and Browning (ISBN: 9780811706100) Angier, R. H.

    If you live in the USA your local public library should be able to ILL this for you.

    Lots of information on bluing and browning of steel
    Thomas Powers
    CoFounder of the Intergalactic Union of Bladesmiths
    "when you forge upon a star"---you better have your union card handy!

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Sweden, Dalarna, Sundborn.
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    I recently made this one.
    And first I fast rusting it with this:
    2 parts Hydrogen peroxide
    1 part Vinegar
    Table salt

    First you take the Hydrogenperoxide and heat it in a microwave oven and then add as much salt that can be dissolved and then the vinegar.

    Take the iron piece and warm it with tap water and then apply the solution with a paintbrush. It starts bubble and make a white foam. Rub it with the brush 20-30s and then rinse in warm water. Repeat about 10-15 times until you have an even layer of rust.
    Now it will be brown and to make it black I boil it in water for about 30-45 minutes. I add a little tea, some say it won't be necessary but I imagine that it helps to color the surface.
    If you don't want it black then boil it for less time, take it up and check it continuously until you are satisfied.
    Then wax it to get a little more glossy look or oil it to keep it dull.

    Edit: It's a very fast way too. It took me about 1,5 hours prepearing everything, rusting, boiling, oiling and taking pictures.
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    Last edited by Henrik Y; 03-16-2008 at 10:01 AM.

  11. #11
    Black: Heat it to 300-500 Celsius degresse. than drop in to normal kitchen oil. END.

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