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Thread: South American Military Swords

  1. #1
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    South American Military Swords

    Have just discovered (Yes I know but I have a mass of unsorted papers!) a hardbound Sword Catalogue from Russell Uniform Co, 1600 Broadway New York.
    It is a photographic album put together by Russels and Wilkinson to supply these patterns of Swords. I should think the date is 1930's(?)
    The following Countries are included:
    Chile (Military, Presentation, Air Force, Police and Cavalry)
    Brazil (midshipman's dirk, naval dirk,military)
    Argentina(Navy,Diplomatic,Cavalry, Minister, Sidearms, Admiral, Navy, Army,Cutlass or Dirks
    Venzuela (Military, Navy)
    San Salvador (Admiral, Navy, Military)
    Costa Rica(Army)
    Peru(Army)
    Guatemala(Military, Navy)
    Cuba(Navy, Military)
    Columbia(Police, Navy, Military, Police)
    Mexico(Military)

    I'll scan them when I have a moment and put them in photobucket
    Robert

  2. #2
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    This would be great!!!
    I have an Eickhorn catalogue of weapons for the Latin American market. Would be interesting to see what you have. It's a rather neglected area of edged weapons collecting, imho. There isn't much literature out there.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dmitry Z~G View Post
    This would be great!!!
    I have an Eickhorn catalogue of weapons for the Latin American market. Would be interesting to see what you have. It's a rather neglected area of edged weapons collecting, imho. There isn't much literature out there.
    I have a feeling from the photographs that Russell's and Wilkinsons have pinched the photographs from Eichkhorn- they have that look. here is a sample page.
    Robert


  4. #4
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    one of mine





    “Do you know what astonished me most in the world? The inability of force to create anything. In the long run, the sword is always beaten by the spirit.” Napoleon Bonaparte

  5. #5
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    There is a booklet by the Spanish designer of the cavalry 1907 sword where he shows together many of the swords in service at that moment 1904, with an special abundance from South America.
    I have a scanned microfilm and maybe I even made a pdf (that was the intention).

    CARVAJAL Y MELGAREJO, Luis, (Marqués de Puerto Seguro). Cosas de espadas. [Madrid : s.n., 1904] (Ricardo Fé). 59 p., 1 h. ; 8º mlla. (17 cm)

    Where could this be now...

    Javier

    PS. Actually is this other booklet, from 1910, so the British 1908 shall already be there.

    I found them! But I cannot open the individual images although I have the large scans (some 30 photograms per scan) This is an example:



    CARVAJAL Y MELGAREJO, Luis, (Marqués de Puerto Seguro). La espada en la actualidad. Madrid : [s.n.], 1910 ([Mateu]). 73 p., 2 h., lám. I-LXXII ; 4º mlla. (27 cm)
    Last edited by Javier Ramos; 04-04-2008 at 04:45 PM.
    La vida amable, el enemigo hombre fuerte, ordinario el peligro, natural la defensa, la Ciencia para conseguirla infalible, su estudio forçoso, y el exercicio necessario conviene al que huviere de ser Diestro, no ignore la teorica, para que en la practica, el cuerpo, el braço, y los instrumentos obren lo conveniente a su perfeccion. --Don Luis Pacheco de Narvaez.

  6. #6
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    Hello, Javier, it's been quite a long time...

    Yes, in the first booklet you mention Puerto-Seguro talks about his tribulations to have his design produced and made regulation, while in the second he summarizes the contemporary state-of-the-art for cavalry swords.

    Anyway, these are only my references, since I haven't had any chance to read them, so a PDF of any of the two would be extremely welcome indeed

    My grain of salt is a curio: it is a standard M1895 Spanish cavalry troopers sabre, produced at the Toledo Factory, but marked for the Colombian Army. Most South and Central American countries had Solingen as their main supplier, but depending on the political situation Spain was still a source.

    I've also seen boarding cutlasses for the Argentinian Navy made at Toledo, but unfortunately I can' find a picture at this moment...

    Juan J.
    Attached Images Attached Images    
    SI, SI
    NO, NON

  7. #7
    This thread got me thinking about some images I had stored away. I've now just uploaded about 40 swords to my website. These are for

    Peruvian
    Chilean
    Venezuelan
    Uruguayan

    I don't know anything about South American swords so would be very happy to know what they may be, or any other comments.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mark Cloke View Post
    This thread got me thinking about some images I had stored away. I've now just uploaded about 40 swords to my website. These are for

    Peruvian
    Chilean
    Venezuelan
    Uruguayan

    I don't know anything about South American swords so would be very happy to know what they may be, or any other comments.
    Mark
    Many thanks for doing that. It adds to our knowledge of a little collected and studied area, at least in the UK!
    Robert

  9. Robert

    Any idea which pattern this Brazilian sword is?
    Attached Images Attached Images  

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    Quote Originally Posted by Mark Austin View Post
    Any idea which pattern this Brazilian sword is?
    Cavalry trooper. Relatively common at ebay. The UAB marking gives them away. I remember vaguely that they were made at UK... or was the officer model only?

    i think it is also this one:






    PS. Oh... you mean that thing...
    Last edited by Javier Ramos; 04-08-2008 at 06:40 AM.
    La vida amable, el enemigo hombre fuerte, ordinario el peligro, natural la defensa, la Ciencia para conseguirla infalible, su estudio forçoso, y el exercicio necessario conviene al que huviere de ser Diestro, no ignore la teorica, para que en la practica, el cuerpo, el braço, y los instrumentos obren lo conveniente a su perfeccion. --Don Luis Pacheco de Narvaez.

  11. #11
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    Going off on a tangent here -- I think that the unpopularity of the Latin American military swords as a whole [aside from the Naval pieces] in the collectors circles is due to the lack of major battles on the South American continent that mattered in the overall global history [this can be debated, i.e. Bolivar, et al, but that the way it is, imho].
    Most people have no clue about the wars between Chile, Brazil, Argentina, Uruguay, Venezuela, etc.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Robert Wilkinson-Latham View Post
    Have just discovered (Yes I know but I have a mass of unsorted papers!) a hardbound Sword Catalogue from Russell Uniform Co, 1600 Broadway New York.
    It is a photographic album put together by Russels and Wilkinson to supply these patterns of Swords. I should think the date is 1930's(?)
    The following Countries are included:
    Chile (Military, Presentation, Air Force, Police and Cavalry)
    Brazil (midshipman's dirk, naval dirk,military)
    Argentina(Navy,Diplomatic,Cavalry, Minister, Sidearms, Admiral, Navy, Army,Cutlass or Dirks
    Venzuela (Military, Navy)
    San Salvador (Admiral, Navy, Military)
    Costa Rica(Army)
    Peru(Army)
    Guatemala(Military, Navy)
    Cuba(Navy, Military)
    Columbia(Police, Navy, Military, Police)
    Mexico(Military)

    I'll scan them when I have a moment and put them in photobucket
    Robert
    Hello Robert,
    I wonder if these papers etc. might have come from the outstanding material you compiled in 1973, "Pictorial History of Swords and Bayonets" ?
    I do not have my copy handy at the moment, but I recall treasuring it then for its comprehensive material which included Latin American weapons. At that time this was truly a first! and this remains a magnificent resource.
    It really is good to have you here posting!!!


    On the note on lack of popularity of Latin American Weapons:

    I agree with Dmitri, that there is truly quite little knowledge of the history of these countries, which is truly unfortunate as it is a colorful and amazing dimension that fulfils more complete understanding of many of our own histories. One of the major factors that I would imagine as the cause of this is the lack of resources for researching these esoteric topics.

    On this subject, I have just returned to research on the Spanish Colonial sword known as the 'espada ancha' , which is another example of this Latin American esoterica in weapons and historical study. I have posted this on a concurrent thread, which hopefully might bring forward discussion and some interest.

    All very best regards,
    Jim

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim McDougall View Post
    Hello Robert,
    I wonder if these papers etc. might have come from the outstanding material you compiled in 1973, "Pictorial History of Swords and Bayonets" ?
    I do not have my copy handy at the moment, but I recall treasuring it then for its comprehensive material which included Latin American weapons. At that time this was truly a first! and this remains a magnificent resource.
    It really is good to have you here posting!!!


    On the note on lack of popularity of Latin American Weapons:

    I agree with Dmitri, that there is truly quite little knowledge of the history of these countries, which is truly unfortunate as it is a colorful and amazing dimension that fulfils more complete understanding of many of our own histories. One of the major factors that I would imagine as the cause of this is the lack of resources for researching these esoteric topics.

    On this subject, I have just returned to research on the Spanish Colonial sword known as the 'espada ancha' , which is another example of this Latin American esoterica in weapons and historical study. I have posted this on a concurrent thread, which hopefully might bring forward discussion and some interest.

    All very best regards,
    Jim
    You are absolutely correct. I had forgotten about those pictures. I think those ones in Pictorial History of Swords and Bayonets (Ian Allen) WERE from the Eickhorn catalogue so I have answered my own question!!!!
    The upshot is that it has at least sparked a discussion into South American swords!
    Robert

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