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Thread: Four "New" Italian Sources

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Belgium
    Posts
    732

    Four "New" Italian Sources

    Greetings, All!

    The past few months have been good for research.

    Steve Hick and I discovered an early Italian printed work by a previously unknown fencing master named Girolamo Lucino of Casalmaggiore. Lucino was a physician and a fencing master who published a book on swordsmanship in 1589. It consists of a dialogue between the author and a nobleman named Mutio Vicenza. I have ordered a digital copy from the library; it should arrive in about a month.

    Next, I have identified, but not yet located, an early 17th century Italian manuscript dealing with a variety of weapons. The author's name is Orafo di Cremona.

    Next, Steve Hick identified a late 15th-early 16th century manuscript, formerly part of the Trivulziana library, which contained fencing material. The portion on fencing was appended to a medical manuscript. It included rhymed Italian precepts on fencing, plus a set of rules governing conduct in the fencing school (unheard of for Italy from this period), and an image of the fencing master kneeling before the Virgin Mary, holding two swords. Unfortunately, our inquiries revealed that this manuscript left the Trivulziana collection, so it remains to be located.

    Finally, Steve Hick identified another Italian manuscript in the Trivulziana library, dating from the early 17th century. Inquiries into this manuscript are still underway.

    These are only results from the Italian field of endeavor. We have also made a number of discoveries from the Spanish, German, and French traditions. More on that later...

    Regards,
    Matt Galas
    Mons, Belgium

  2. This week has been phenomenal! Every day I would log into SFI and see that more and more period sources had been rescued/recovered. I'm suprised that not more people are flipping out right now.

  3. #3
    No kidding. Time to start brushing off my dictionaries, pick a manuscript, and settle down to work.
    Mediocrity knows nothing higher than itself, but excellence admires and respects genius.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb 2002
    Location
    Suburban Chicago area
    Posts
    3,595
    It's sort of a Saturnalian romp of manuscripts, eh?

    Russ - been trying to reach you by PM and email. Can you shoot me an email? I heard a rumor you might be heading this way soon....
    Greg Mele
    Chicago Swordplay Guild

    Freelance Academy Press: Books on Western Martial Arts and Historical Swordsmanship

    Chivalric Fighting Arts Association

    "If the tongue could cut
    as the sword can do,
    the dead would be infinite."

    Filippo Vadi, "Arte Dimicandi Gladiatoria" (c.1482 - 87)

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb 2002
    Location
    Falls Church, VA
    Posts
    1,524
    Quote Originally Posted by Gregory Mele View Post
    It's sort of a Saturnalian romp of manuscripts, eh?

    Russ - been trying to reach you by PM and email. Can you shoot me an email? I heard a rumor you might be heading this way soon....
    Dance of the Hippos.....

    Steve

  6. Fabulous! Thanks to Matt and Steve - beers on me when we meet!

    Sean
    Sean Hayes, Maestro d'armi
    Northwest Fencing Academy

    Chivalric Fighting Arts Association
    San Jose Fencing Masters Program Examination Board

    One should never confuse the rules of a competition with the rules of an art.

    People talk a lot about speed, but not very much about control, safety, tactics, and trying to get close to the reality of sharps. When simulating sharp fights, how fast one charges in depends on how quickly one would like to die.


  7. #7
    Quote Originally Posted by Gregory Mele View Post
    Russ - been trying to reach you by PM and email. Can you shoot me an email? I heard a rumor you might be heading this way soon....
    Don't currently have your email. Yeah, I was in your neck of the woods doing the sabre thing that I advertised on the events forum. You guys had a prize play that day, or so I'm told. It went well?
    Mediocrity knows nothing higher than itself, but excellence admires and respects genius.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Feb 2002
    Location
    Suburban Chicago area
    Posts
    3,595
    Quote Originally Posted by Russ Mitchell View Post
    Don't currently have your email. Yeah, I was in your neck of the woods doing the sabre thing that I advertised on the events forum. You guys had a prize play that day, or so I'm told. It went well?
    It did, but I'd have loved to hooked up before or after for beers, since you were apparently blocks away!

    Anyway, my email is the same: gregmele@yahoo.com
    Greg Mele
    Chicago Swordplay Guild

    Freelance Academy Press: Books on Western Martial Arts and Historical Swordsmanship

    Chivalric Fighting Arts Association

    "If the tongue could cut
    as the sword can do,
    the dead would be infinite."

    Filippo Vadi, "Arte Dimicandi Gladiatoria" (c.1482 - 87)

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Turin, Italy
    Posts
    29
    Quote Originally Posted by Matt Galas View Post
    Greetings, All!

    The past few months have been good for research.

    Steve Hick and I discovered an early Italian printed work by a previously unknown fencing master named Girolamo Lucino of Casalmaggiore. Lucino was a physician and a fencing master who published a book on swordsmanship in 1589. It consists of a dialogue between the author and a nobleman named Mutio Vicenza. I have ordered a digital copy from the library; it should arrive in about a month.

    Next, I have identified, but not yet located, an early 17th century Italian manuscript dealing with a variety of weapons. The author's name is Orafo di Cremona.

    Next, Steve Hick identified a late 15th-early 16th century manuscript, formerly part of the Trivulziana library, which contained fencing material. The portion on fencing was appended to a medical manuscript. It included rhymed Italian precepts on fencing, plus a set of rules governing conduct in the fencing school (unheard of for Italy from this period), and an image of the fencing master kneeling before the Virgin Mary, holding two swords. Unfortunately, our inquiries revealed that this manuscript left the Trivulziana collection, so it remains to be located.

    Finally, Steve Hick identified another Italian manuscript in the Trivulziana library, dating from the early 17th century. Inquiries into this manuscript are still underway.

    These are only results from the Italian field of endeavor. We have also made a number of discoveries from the Spanish, German, and French traditions. More on that later...

    Regards,
    Hello Matt.

    Just wouldlike to know how I can access this books. I live in Italy, maybe it should be easier for me to reach the source.

    Still, the "Orafo di Cremona" could be a general name, because "orafo" in italian is the person whowork the gold, and maybe shouldn't be a specific name of the fencing master.

    Anyway, great work!

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