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Thread: 18th Century Western Sword Admiration Society

  1. #26

    re

    My favourite,
    a Hussard officer sabre of the Bercheny hussards, Model 1752, used in the 7 Years War.
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  2. #27
    Quote Originally Posted by J.G. Hopkins View Post
    You were crazy to sell that one, Andre!
    Zeus! I have to agree with Jonathan.

  3. #28
    Quote Originally Posted by Thom R. View Post
    Royal Armouries ix 313 Mazansky IVBC3 English brass baskethilt 1725-1750



    that seems the type of sword that Mr. Ducote would appreciate!

  4. #29
    Quote Originally Posted by Dmitry Z~G View Post
    Jonathan, as promised, here are the photos of the French ca.1730-1750 infantry hanger from my collection. Note the general appearance and composition of the hilt, and compare it to yours. Also note the "Property of le Roi" stamp on the blade. The blade on yours is different, obviously, but nevertheless, this is is something to take notice.
    Dmitry,
    Thank you for posting this nice example! Some elements of the hilt are quite similar--the pommel, the form of the knuckle guard, the stag grip, the ferrule. I am not sure if I would say, "Yes, mine is definitely French." However, I think I might say it could be either English or French. Looking at the shell guard hangers in Neumann, the French examples tend to have antler grips. Hmmm...

    Jonathan

  5. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by J.G. Hopkins View Post
    You were crazy to sell that one, Andre!
    Yes, well. . . . . flighty as the wind blows.

    Andre
    Andre F. Ducote
    Mississippi

  6. #31
    Quote Originally Posted by A.Ducote View Post
    Yes, well. . . . . flighty as the wind blows.

    Andre


    Crazy like a fox, of course.

  7. #32
    The original owner of the sword I opened the thread with wrote me:

    Hello Morgan,
    This note is in regards to that facetted-hilt, green leather gripped loophilt that you started the "1700s Sword Appreciation Society" with: I used to own it! I purchased it from Wm. Fagan in the early 1980s, and sold it about 3-4 years later. The hilt was really nice, but the blade didn't excite me that much, so it got sold to finance other purchases.

    This isn't the first time I've seen swords that I've owned turn up on eBay (wasn't gallowglass selling that sword last month?).

    Perhaps the new owner will write too........
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  8. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by J.G. Hopkins View Post
    Dmitry,
    Thank you for posting this nice example! Some elements of the hilt are quite similar--the pommel, the form of the knuckle guard, the stag grip, the ferrule.
    That just about describes the whole hilt, doesn't it?

  9. #34
    An English horseman's basket-hilted backsword c.1750, with a triple fullered German blade, similar to Neumann 274.S.




  10. #35
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    I don't think I have shown this one before. Its a 26 inch long, single edged, hollowground sword with a brass baroque styled hilt. Probably mid 18th c. There is a slight false edge near the tip and the sword has a rather fascinating cut & thrust type of blade which I have not seen elsewhere. Inscription on the sword reads "Hoc Langi Morti Ferrum". Also has some engraving. The spine is 1/4 inch so its quite stiff but because of the hollowground cross section, blade is rather light (and sharp along the one edge). Bigger than a dagger yet shorter than most smallswords of the period. Seems like a personal defense weapon, something a coachman might have used or for someone who wanted a more easily concealed sword on their person when out in public. Morgan is right - so many unique styles of swords in the mid 18th century!






  11. #36
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    Dominic - that dragoon sword is in the wow category! still has a lot of the gilt still on the brass. very nice. tr

  12. #37
    WOW! It reminds me of some kind of 18th century western version of a tai-chi sword! Very interesting. I shall try to find out what the motto means. Is the whole sword 26 inches or just the blade.
    This thread has been a great opportunity to see some fine weapons/swords.
    Last edited by morgan butler; 12-12-2008 at 02:41 PM.

  13. #38
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    Hi Morgan. Blade is 26 inches. sword is about 34. Morti ferrum translates (at least to me) as "deadly steel", exactly what "langi" would translate to in latin is somewhat debateable i suppose. The blade seems purposefully built, given that it is from the era when the smallsword and other types of hangars were so prevalent. yet the hilt offers very little protection for the hand - certainly much less than a smallsword and less than many of the swords that today we would call "pillow swords". so it just seems to me that the sword was deliberately built for someone who knew how to use a blade but wanted an easily carried and concealable sword.
    Last edited by Thom R.; 12-12-2008 at 02:37 PM.

  14. #39
    Yes, perhaps the sword would be worn under a Greatcoat by a coachman or huntsman. It would be a great combo with the hunting dagger you showed earlier.
    Last edited by morgan butler; 12-12-2008 at 02:56 PM.

  15. #40
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    Thom, is the blade triangular in cross-section, like a small sword blade?

  16. #41
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    Morgan. Generally speaking "Hoc" in Latin means "this or these" while "morti" is any of the words relating to death. "Ferrum" is iron of course but I am unable to find "langi" in any Latin-English dictionary. I hope you are able to find an exact translation and report it here so I can say "Damn, why didn't I think of that."
    "Ancora imparo - Michelangelo Buonarotti"

  17. #42
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    It's probably a grammatical mistake on the part of whoever engraved the blade. Not uncommon to find mistakes on blades from that time frame, in fact it's more common to find mistakes, than to see the correct spelling.

  18. #43
    Quote Originally Posted by L.S. Lawrence View Post
    I like this one quite a bit as well...

    The 1788 design aside, I would be interested to know its actual date of manufacture, usage, provenance, etc., but I guess that has to remain part of the mystery.

    One of the swords I really regret selling

    It's English about 1790. Shorter blade more like the 96 than the standard 1788 IIRC.
    Had a dragon engraved on the blade both sides.

    David

  19. #44
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    I couldn't let this thread go by without adding a Scottish flavour to the mix, an S bar basket with the as yet still unknown armourers mark on the 33 5/8in double edge blade. The basket is 1720 to 1760 depending who I talk to.
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    David Gray

  20. #45
    18th century Silver hilted guacho shortsword/hanger. 26 inch blade. Never seen one before.
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  21. #46
    Here is full profile pic that can be "clicked" on. the blade is 23 inches.
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    Last edited by morgan butler; 12-16-2008 at 12:22 PM.

  22. #47
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    like your ideal

    I like your ideal on 18th century sword society' but i had to notice all i read so far is on origanals , being a reenactor of the mid 18th century all i can afford is modern reproductions, maybe you or someone out there know of quality weapons still being made
    T. SMITH

  23. #48

    French Infantry Officer Sword

    I just got this lovely French Infantry Officer Sword. Its really growing on me and makes up for the one I missed out on last year. It has a 30 inch rapier style blade and the remnants of a fleur de lie on either side. This is a great and well balanced, light, fighting sidearm and has the old nicks near the forte to prove it. The blade is nicely represented in "Swords and Blades of the American Reveloution.", which pleases me greatly. I believe this sword to be 1740's-1750's. Here are some crude cellphone pics of it. I'll put up some better pics later. This is my birthday present to myself. Enjoy!
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  24. #49
    Morgan,
    Happy birthday, and congrats on the nice new sword! What drew you to this type of sword?

    Jonathan

  25. #50
    I really like fighting sidearms. this sword is elegant, light, and has a nice cut and thrust blade. The hilt is roomier than the civilian smallsword hilt. I like the idea of a sword that may have been used in the 7 years war!
    Here is a pic of an earlier version that got away from me last year. Its very similar and also french.
    I'm still looking for it!
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