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Thread: 18th Century Western Sword Admiration Society

  1. #51
    I had some requests for better pics of my 1740 French Infantry officer sword. Here they are!
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  2. #52
    Arne

  3. #53
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    Arne - what an awesome lineup! Can the hilt designs be related back to specific countries or regiments? tr

  4. #54
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    Steel Hilted Hanger

    Here is an 18th c steel hilted infantry hanger. Not sure about who would have carried it (could be British). "Me Fecit Solingen" is on the ricasso as well as some generic etching in the first 8 inches of the blade. Blade length is 30 inches. Has a horn handle with a spiral groove with a silver ribbon wrap. pommel is a cap but has some interesting decoration on it as well. Guard is slotted with some heart and quatrefoil cut-outs. The guard bars were ground to give a wavy edge. Quite nice for a steel slotted hilt. Whoever purchased this for their company or regiment didn't spare expense. Its a beefy blade as well.





  5. #55
    Arne - what an awesome lineup! Can the hilt designs be related back to specific countries or regiments?
    Hello Tom ! They are all Danish/Norwegian(one country at the time) Naval officers Pallasck's/Broadswords from about 1720 - 1750.
    Arne

  6. #56

    Lightbulb Hauntingly familiar...

    Quote Originally Posted by J.G. Hopkins View Post
    Morgan,
    That is a nice sword. I'll bite...

    My collection has taken a Victorian turn in the past year, but for the majority of my life as a collector was devoted to 18th and early 19th century swords. One of my favorites from that era of collecting is a mid-18th century English hanger. It has an antler grip and a brass pommel, guard and shell with few traces of black paint. No maker marks.

    Grip: 3.5", Hilt (w/o shell): 5.0", Hilt (w/shell): 6.75", Blade: 27.75", Overall: 32.75", Weight: 1 lb. 4 oz.


    Hey Jonathan,

    Now this beautiful hanger is one of those "that got away". I still remeber it advertised by William Fagan & Co. (Faganarms) in one of their New Stock bulletins/catalogs, all those years ago. Sorry, I still can't seem to locate it. If I do, I will send it to you. While I was not destined to be it's proud owner, I can think of no better person who should be, than you (gentleman, scholar, family man, etc...). It fits well with the fine collection you have gathered together. Treasure it always. It still haunts me, to this day, though. It is just one of several beauties that have burned themselves into my heart & mind, only to slip away, into the collection of another person. Hey, you can't win 'em all, can you? Besides, where would be the adventure, if you could? After all, it is much more exhilarating to catch the elusive bird, than simply scooping-up every interesting blade that comes along the pike, without the possibility of another seizing it first. The excitement of chase or what?

    Thanks for sharing these pics, as it is a very lovely one! Can a fighting weapon, designed to injure and/or kill, be considered lovely? They can and they often are. I believe the term is functional art and is most fitting with many of these great examples. Seeing these photos makes me feel nostalgic. Ahhhh... the good 'ol days.

    Ciao, Jon
    Last edited by jonpalombi; 03-22-2009 at 06:57 AM.
    "A wise person aspires the study of swordsmanship. A lucky person finds a worthy teacher, an unlucky person finds yet another student... in the guise of a genuine Master. Sadly, a fool cannot tell the difference either way." Anecdotes of The Unknown Swordsman

  7. #57
    Thats an very nice hanger ! Similar hilt types was used by other period armies as well:





    The top hanger bearing the monogram of Christian 7(king from 1766-1808) dated 1791. The second bearing Frederik 5 (1746-1766) monogram dated 1766. Both with regimetal markings to Jeager regiments.
    Arne

  8. #58
    By Jove, I've been away from my own thread for quite a while! Arne, those are great swords, I am getting an affection for those jaeger style blades. Any other great 18th century swords?
    Last edited by morgan butler; 04-01-2009 at 11:18 AM.

  9. #59
    Here is my latest aquisition, a 1770-1780's english smallsword.
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    Peace, Love, SWORDS!

  10. #60
    Quote Originally Posted by Thom R. View Post
    I don't think I have shown this one before. Its a 26 inch long, single edged, hollowground sword with a brass baroque styled hilt. Probably mid 18th c. There is a slight false edge near the tip and the sword has a rather fascinating cut & thrust type of blade which I have not seen elsewhere. Inscription on the sword reads "Hoc Langi Morti Ferrum". Also has some engraving. The spine is 1/4 inch so its quite stiff but because of the hollowground cross section, blade is rather light (and sharp along the one edge). Bigger than a dagger yet shorter than most smallswords of the period. Seems like a personal defense weapon, something a coachman might have used or for someone who wanted a more easily concealed sword on their person when out in public. Morgan is right - so many unique styles of swords in the mid 18th century!





    Hey Thom,
    I was wondering if yu could post some photos of the other side of that beautiful weapon. I just acquired a military smallsword that has a very wide hollowground blade as well, and no knuckle guard. It sort of reminded me of this.
    Peace, Love, SWORDS!

  11. #61
    Join Date
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    Quote Originally Posted by morgan butler View Post
    Hey Thom,
    I was wondering if yu could post some photos of the other side of that beautiful weapon. I just acquired a military smallsword that has a very wide hollowground blade as well, and no knuckle guard. It sort of reminded me of this.
    Morgan - love your new smallsword! (saw the mA post). If you look at the photos I have already posted you will see both sides of the blade at the hilt. That particular sword of mine is single edged (like a backsword), has a spine almost like a piped back, and slightly hollowground triangular cross section - will see about posting a photo looking down the spine/ tr

  12. #62
    Ah so, I dont know why I was thinking it had a cross section like an epee/smallsword. It sure is an amazing weapon however!
    Here are pics of my new smallsword that it sort of reminds me of. I probably have posted it in too many places (such poor taste on my part) oh well....

    Does anyone have any pics of 18th century swords that they own or particularly admire? I really appreciate Georgian Sabres, and all manner of 18th cent. hangers.
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    Last edited by morgan butler; 08-26-2009 at 09:28 AM.
    Peace, Love, SWORDS!

  13. #63
    I can't believe no one has posted any spadroons or spadroon type hangers!!


  14. #64
    Sweet!(as they say)
    I really like the 5 ball hanger at the top David. I will probably make that pic my computer desktop at work for a few days.
    Here's my 18th cent. spadroon contribution:
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    Peace, Love, SWORDS!

  15. #65
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    Short Saber

    Here is another interesting short saber from late 18th c (maybe early 19th). It has a brass&gilt hilt with D-guard, quillion is shaped like a shell, and has an ebony grip. The blade is 20.5 inches long, almost dirk sized, overall length 25 inches, Blade width is 1.4 inches at the hilt, blade thickness of 9 mm, point of balance 2.0 inches and total weight is 619 grams. Although the blade is short, almost dirk size, it is definitely not shortened and appears to be original. The blade (both flat and spine) is covered with script, foliate scrolls, a Turbaned head, crossed pistol and sword, and gaelic inscriptions some of which I have yet to translate. The pommel cap is engraved with an abbreviated form of "Lamh Laidir an Uachtar" (sic) which translates to "the strong hand is uppermost" and is the traditional motto for the O'Briens as well as some other families in western Ireland.





  16. #66
    Very nice Tom! A true Irish patriots sword. Do you have any idea who carried it or what its history is? I really like the scroll work along the spine of the blade.

    Here is a Polish infantry/artillery sabre that really made an impression on me, it was on ebay last week and I made sure to nab some pics because I thought it was so handsome.
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    Peace, Love, SWORDS!

  17. #67
    Here is the link to see all the many photo's of this beauty. I encourage you to check it out while the photo's are still current! Its outstanding.
    http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll...=STRK:MEWAX:IT
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    Peace, Love, SWORDS!

  18. #68
    Join Date
    May 2002
    Location
    Australia
    Posts
    288

    British Pattern Lt. Cavalry Officer's Blue & Gilt Sword

    hi Morgan

    Finally got round to putting in a first Georgian sword..

    BRITISH PATTERN LT. CAVALRY OFFICER'S BLUE & GILT SWORD: 30" curved blade with 95% intact blue & gilt panels to 6" of the point, etched with trophies, urns, floral tributes, female warrior & Scales of Justice; no visible maker; very good silver plated stirrup hilt with minor losses; unusual shaped languets; black fish skin grips bound with silver, a couple of loose threads; complete with correct silver plated steel scabbard; excellent condition. In the floral design on one side of the blade near the hilts a lion’s head appears

    General consensus is that the sword is British private treaty for a high ranking officer. It has been suggested that the presence of silver plate may indicate service in Indian where plating scabbards and hilts with silver occurred to protect from the climate.

    I will try and add a sword every couple of days.

    It is always nice to engage other sword collectors because the sword collecting fraternity in Australia is quite small, and in South Australia smaller still.

    Cheers Cathey
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  19. #69
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    May 2002
    Location
    Australia
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    CAVALRY ENGLISH DRAGOONS Light sword, circa 1750 - 60.

    CAVALRY ENGLISH DRAGOONS Light sword, circa 1750 - 60. Rare style of grip. The hilt consists of a dish, two side bars, and a triangular guard on the knuckle bow. Straight single edged blade 32 1/2 ins. (82.5 cm), bears a running wolf mark.

    Cheers Cathey
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    Last edited by Cathey Brimage; 09-18-2009 at 04:43 AM.

  20. #70
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    May 2002
    Location
    Australia
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    Cavalry Grenadier Guard Officers Sword 1766-88

    CAVALRY GRENADIER GUARD OFFICERS SWORD English. Blade 90cm (2 ft 11 ½ ins) Hilt 16 cm (6 ½ ins) about 1766-1788. Fish-skin covered grip. Blade with inlaid gold decoration. Metal faceted at both ends of grip and the pommel has spiral pattern decoration.

    Cheers Cathey
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    Last edited by Cathey Brimage; 09-18-2009 at 04:51 AM.

  21. #71
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    Apr 2007
    Location
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    Quote Originally Posted by morgan butler View Post
    Here is a Polish infantry/artillery sabre that really made an impression on me, it was on ebay last week and I made sure to nab some pics because I thought it was so handsome.
    Just because the seller says it's Polish, it doesn't make it Polish.

  22. #72
    Cathey,
    Very nice pics! I alway enjoy seeing horse swords, theres always something very archetypal and thrilling about the Cavalry! I would love some time to see an English Trooper sword from 1700-1712.

    Dimitry,
    What nationality do you think it is? Or is it merely "European"?
    Peace, Love, SWORDS!

  23. #73
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    Apr 2007
    Location
    Rhode Island
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    Quote Originally Posted by morgan butler View Post

    Dimitry,
    What nationality do you think it is? Or is it merely "European"?
    I don't know the origin of this sword, but to me it looks anything but Polish. Perhaps English..perhaps not.

  24. #74
    Quote Originally Posted by Dmitry Z~G View Post
    I don't know the origin of this sword, but to me it looks anything but Polish. Perhaps English..perhaps not.

    Still, a very lovely piece
    Peace, Love, SWORDS!

  25. #75
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    Apr 2007
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    Quote Originally Posted by morgan butler View Post
    Still, a very lovely piece

    Undoubtedly. And a piece that is definitely worth further research.

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