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Thread: Whats YOUR favorite production Katana?

  1. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by M.K. Ridgeway View Post
    Hey Jerry, how about a thread with some pics of those Citadel, especially the Ken...

    I took my Yoshi for granted when I had it, and now I miss it terribly
    Sure thing, Marc. My wife gets back on Wednesday with the digital camera and I'll try to snap some pics of my whole Citadel collection side-by-side for comparisons and contrasts relative to each other. Here are some pics I'd previously taken of a few more of the blades referenced.
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    "Without a sign his sword the brave man draws,
    And asks no omen but his country’s cause."

    ---The Iliad of Homer, Book xii, Line 283


    "Democracy is two wolves and a lamb deciding what to have for dinner; Liberty is a well-armed lamb."
    ---Benjamin Franklin

  2. #27
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    Hey Marc mate -

    I didnt know you had owned a Citadel as well
    Bud you've had more production kats than ive had
    hangovers - and thats a lot hehhee

    seriously though Marc/Jerry - Citadel has quite a big prescence over here in Europe - its kinda like what Bugei is to the US sword community , the high end of the production market.

    and until you see what they go for in EU countries
    you dont realise just how good a job mike crampton has done to keep the prices down to around $1000 - $1200 at shadow of leaves , over here there at least 50 percent more .

    marc if you have any pics of the yoshi i'd love to see them mate - as well as jerry's.

    cheers

    Mick
    " Put on the full armor of God so that you can take your stand against the devil's schemes. For our struggle is not against flesh and blood, but against principalities, against the authorities, against the powers of this dark world and against the spiritual forces of evil in the heavenly realms."



    Ephesians 6:11

  3. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by michael wilson View Post
    Hey Marc mate -

    I didnt know you had owned a Citadel as well
    Bud you've had more production kats than ive had
    hangovers - and thats a lot hehhee

    seriously though Marc/Jerry - Citadel has quite a big prescence over here in Europe - its kinda like what Bugei is to the US sword community , the high end of the production market.

    and until you see what they go for in EU countries
    you dont realise just how good a job mike crampton has done to keep the prices down to around $1000 - $1200 at shadow of leaves , over here there at least 50 percent more .

    marc if you have any pics of the yoshi i'd love to see them mate - as well as jerry's.

    cheers

    Mick

    Mick ,

    It was a well made sword, and beautiful... but not much of a cutter
    At least mine wasn't ... the old Mas. Bamboo outclassed it as a cutter... thats why I sold it...

    I will dig, but I had it back in 2005 before I joined SFI , and right when I joined SFI, sold it in mid 2006... pictures of it are almost as rare as photos of a SB custom katana

  4. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by M.K. Ridgeway View Post
    Mick ,

    It was a well made sword, and beautiful... but not much of a cutter
    At least mine wasn't ... the old Mas. Bamboo outclassed it as a cutter... thats why I sold it...
    The only thing I've cut with any of my Citadels is myself...no joke. Not two hours after I bought the aikuchi above, I was mountainbiking with a couple buddies. I'd put the aikuchi in my camelback in it's case not wanting to leave it in my car in a public lot known for break-ins. While decending a steep, overgrown area at high speed, I impaled my right forearm on a 1/2" thick branch that was broken off and pointing into the path. I skidded to a halt to find about 2 1/2" of the stick stabbed deep into my arm and broken off right at skin level.

    I couldn't even pedal back to my car to drive for medical attention because the stick was pinning muscles or something internally into a position the prevented me from being able to grip anything, much less my handlebars enough to ride. With only the aikuchi with me as a tool, my queasy buddy had to slice my arm open against the stick where it entered while I poured seltzer water over the wound to keep the blood from obscuring his view of what he was doing. After steeling his nerves and making about a 3/4" incision, he could finally see enough of the end of the stick to grip it with his pair of needle-nose pliers with enough force(it was slippery) to pull the damned long thing out of my arm. It took almost six months for the internal hematoma to shrink all the way and nerve feeling to return to that portion of my forearm.

    Had I not been so lucky as to have it with me that day(the Citadel aikuchi), I don't think that particular cycling episode would have turned out quite so nicely.
    "Without a sign his sword the brave man draws,
    And asks no omen but his country’s cause."

    ---The Iliad of Homer, Book xii, Line 283


    "Democracy is two wolves and a lamb deciding what to have for dinner; Liberty is a well-armed lamb."
    ---Benjamin Franklin

  5. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jerry G. View Post
    The only thing I've cut with any of my Citadels is myself...no joke. Not two hours after I bought the aikuchi above, I was mountainbiking with a couple buddies. I'd put the aikuchi in my camelback in it's case not wanting to leave it in my car in a public lot known for break-ins. While decending a steep, overgrown area at high speed, I impaled my right forearm on a 1/2" thick branch that was broken off and pointing into the path. I skidded to a halt to find about 2 1/2" of the stick stabbed deep into my arm and broken off right at skin level.

    I couldn't even pedal back to my car to drive for medical attention because the stick was pinning muscles or something internally into a position the prevented me from being able to grip anything, much less my handlebars enough to ride. With only the aikuchi with me as a tool, my queasy buddy had to slice my arm open against the stick where it entered while I poured seltzer water over the wound to keep the blood from obscuring his view of what he was doing. After steeling his nerves and making about a 3/4" incision, he could finally see enough of the end of the stick to grip it with his pair of needle-nose pliers with enough force(it was slippery) to pull the damned long thing out of my arm. It took almost six months for the internal hematoma to shrink all the way and nerve feeling to return to that portion of my forearm.

    Had I not been so lucky as to have it with me that day(the Citadel aikuchi), I don't think that particular cycling episode would have turned out quite so nicely.
    Wow , cool story.. I think I'd keep that one forever...

  6. #31
    Damn, Jerry, that's friggin' hardcore! Makes me wanna stay off my mountain bike!

  7. #32

    Thumbs up

    For me it has to be the Bugei Samurai. Why? Well, it has a special place in my heart as my first production sword and as the best quality all round performer in any modern blade I have ever seen/used.

    I researched what production katana to buy for a couple of years and finally, painstakingly decided on the samurai - and I most certainly wasnt let down. I have pushed this beast to the edge, cut a six roll tatami mat like it wasnt there, green tree branches so thick it makes my eyes water (over 3 inches in dia.) and have never managed to damage this blade. She now has a few scratches on the shinogi but no chips (or micro chips) whatsoever on the ha, regardless of what I have put her through and the hard targets she has munched. I simply love her and never want to part with this beautiful piece. Bugei Samurai FTW!!
    The Mind Truely Is The Sharpest Blade And The Deadliest Weapon.

  8. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by Alex Kakashi View Post
    ...green tree branches so thick it makes my eyes water (over 3 inches in dia.) and have never managed to damage this blade.
    Please humor me by saying the tree brances were inadvertently cut because they hung too near your tatami stand. I wouldn't even cut tree branches with my Cheness milkjugulator much less a fine blade like Bugei's Samurai!
    "Without a sign his sword the brave man draws,
    And asks no omen but his country’s cause."

    ---The Iliad of Homer, Book xii, Line 283


    "Democracy is two wolves and a lamb deciding what to have for dinner; Liberty is a well-armed lamb."
    ---Benjamin Franklin

  9. #34
    lol...then I do it so that you dont have to. I wanted to test the blade and my skill. I wanted to see what could be done...with THAT blade. I took the risk and found the interesting results I was hoping for - clean cuts with no bends or damage to the ha.
    The Mind Truely Is The Sharpest Blade And The Deadliest Weapon.

  10. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jerry G. View Post
    Please humor me by saying the tree brances were inadvertently cut because they hung too near your tatami stand. I wouldn't even cut tree branches with my Cheness milkjugulator much less a fine blade like Bugei's Samurai!
    I don't know if I would consider ANY production sword fine. They're tools meant to be used, not art objects.
    That said however, cutting a fairly thick branch can sometimes chip or bend a mistempered ( is that a word? If not it ought to be!) blade.
    Then again, to flipflop back to the other side of the argument, I've cut some pretty respectable saplings with a $100 Hanwei "Zatoichi" sword. Even more amazing, I've also done it with a crappy 420J stainless steel SLO and had no damage occur except cracking the $1.99 plastic tsuka. I replaced the tsuka and extremely ugy and historically inaccurate saya with ones I made from poplar and cut some more... To this day nearly 20 years later, I still have it hanging on my wall, battered, chipped like hell...but still relatively whole.

  11. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gary S View Post
    I don't know if I would consider ANY production sword fine. They're tools meant to be used, not art objects.
    Well, I'm going to throw out a friendly disagreement, Gary. Mainly, I think it's kind of tough to lump all production blades into one big category, you know? On one end of the spectrum, there's quality high end like Bugei, Citadel, MAS... and on the other end, "fleabay" "can chop iron" stuff...

    I still don't know much about swords, but I think in general that beauty is in the eye of the beholder. And a word like "art" has meant so many different things to different people... I guess I'm just trying to say that I like production swords for what they are... and I think a lot of people could find artistic beauty in at least some of them and treasure them as such, even if they are imperfect in a lot of ways and not even 1/10 the price of customs or antiques.

    And Jerry's Citadel katana is my favorite in this thread so far. Come on, people! Post with pics!
    REAL Star Wars fans HATE Star Wars (and Lucas)... but LOVE the idea.

  12. #37
    IMHO, any NEW sword, whether it be a production blade or a custom made sword by the world's most skilled artisans - unless otherwise specified, (be it a religious item like sacraficial piece designed to rest at a shrine or something) is to be USED.
    What is the point of making/buying new swords unless there is some kind of use for them? I can understand if some people's "use" is putting them on a wall and looking at them. Maybe even swinging them carefully through thin air could be considered "use".... but for me - use means use.
    With no offence intended to anyne - when I buy a NEW sword (ie not antique nihonto, but perhaps a new nihonto) I intend to put it to some kind of use. I "use" antique blades to gain knowledge from, to study and appreciate, but I (usually) dont actually cut with them. Some of these are fine blades, some are not so fine; most have been retired either because of age, wear or intrinsic value...but I do not believe in this nonsense about never going anywhere near anything cuttable with a nice "production katana" because of the fact that you might "spoil the blade". lol. This is probably the most ludicrous thing I have ever heard anyone say - but there seems to be many an hombre spouting this self righteous baloney. Thats like saying dont drive your new car, you might wreck it... "ooh i never cut with my nice swords only with my $50 wallhanger cos I dont wanna mess up the blade"... "i just bought a ferrari but i only ever go out in my 76 pinto cos im afraid of scratching the paintwork...."
    Fine by me, but you'll never get the hang of using your nicer swords...or driving your nice car, they will both just sit in the garage gathering dust - which is a bit of a shame.
    The Mind Truely Is The Sharpest Blade And The Deadliest Weapon.

  13. #38
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    Alex, the fact is that, unless your full-time job is be a sensei in a dojo, no one actually "needs" to use any of their katanas to cut anything ever... whether that blade is an antique or custom or production. I also don't think the car analogy really works here. "Meant to be used"? If we take that notion to its logical conclusion, then all swords are actually "meant to be used" to maim and harm and kill PEOPLE. Not inanimate bamboo or tatami or bottles. PEOPLE. So, does that mean we should all go out and put our swords and katanas to their "intended use"? Heck, I hope not. I can't even sit through a bloody movie.

    "nonsense"... "ludicrous"... "spouting self righteous baloney"... are all pretty harsh and judgmental words to describe something which for most people is just a fun hobby. And I really don't see what being self-righteous has to do with anything.

    As far as I can see there's nothing wrong with just having something as an art object in your home that brings you pleasure. It's not bothering anyone else and no one else needs to agree that it's pretty or whatever. In fact, I don't think it's really anyone else's business. But let's agree to disagree.
    REAL Star Wars fans HATE Star Wars (and Lucas)... but LOVE the idea.

  14. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by Alex Kakashi View Post
    What is the point of making/buying new swords unless there is some kind of use for them? I can understand if some people's "use" is putting them on a wall and looking at them. Maybe even swinging them carefully through thin air could be considered "use".... but for me - use means use.
    With no offence intended to anyne - when I buy a NEW sword (ie not antique nihonto, but perhaps a new nihonto) I intend to put it to some kind of use. I "use" antique blades to gain knowledge from, to study and appreciate, but I (usually) dont actually cut with them.
    i think this is the final word in that little debate.

    as far as favorite production sword, there are so many out there these days it's hard to narrow it down. it basically comes down to what you want in a sword. for the wall-displayers out there, the damascus ebay katana should do the trick quite nicely. for people who plan on cutting with their blades, be it leisure or destructive, blades with good, solid reputations as "performers" are the route to go.
    les yeich (pronounced yike)

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  15. #40
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    A word on the previous debate: Whosoever plunks down the cash for a sword can do whatever they want with them within the bounds of law(or face the consequences). I personally don't cut with the nicer ones because I am not trained to do so and have no desire to bend and scratch up an expensive blade due to my technical incompetence. I DO cut with a Cheness blade remounted to the task. For me, there is a difference between a $300 blade and a $1000-$4000 blade...because I am not rich. I also see a difference between cutting milk jugs & pool noodles(hacker targets), cutting tatami or green bamboo(proper targets) and cutting tree limbs, shrubbery, 2x4s or discarded mannequin dressed like Elvis(destructive targets). Were I a millionaire, I may not make such a distinction but alas, I am not. Therefore, I choose not to beer bong Dom Perignon, light Cohibas with 50's, peel out & do doughnuts in a Ferrari, lick & stick rare stamps on the sewer bill or prune the underbrush with my Bugei. If I win the lottery, you guys'll be the first to know when I start snapping up all the nice blades in the SFI classifieds.
    "Without a sign his sword the brave man draws,
    And asks no omen but his country’s cause."

    ---The Iliad of Homer, Book xii, Line 283


    "Democracy is two wolves and a lamb deciding what to have for dinner; Liberty is a well-armed lamb."
    ---Benjamin Franklin

  16. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by Benjamin P. View Post
    Alex, the fact is that, unless your full-time job is be a sensei in a dojo, no one actually "needs" to use any of their katanas to cut anything ever... whether that blade is an antique or custom or production. I also don't think the car analogy really works here. "Meant to be used"? If we take that notion to its logical conclusion, then all swords are actually "meant to be used" to maim and harm and kill PEOPLE. Not inanimate bamboo or tatami or bottles. PEOPLE. So, does that mean we should all go out and put our swords and katanas to their "intended use"? Heck, I hope not. I can't even sit through a bloody movie.

    "nonsense"... "ludicrous"... "spouting self righteous baloney"... are all pretty harsh and judgmental words to describe something which for most people is just a fun hobby. And I really don't see what being self-righteous has to do with anything.

    As far as I can see there's nothing wrong with just having something as an art object in your home that brings you pleasure. It's not bothering anyone else and no one else needs to agree that it's pretty or whatever. In fact, I don't think it's really anyone else's business. But let's agree to disagree.
    I certainly agree that there is a world of difference between MARVELOUS SNAKE TSUBA SWORD and a Bugei sword, and Alex certainly could have been a bit more diplomatic with his choice of words. However, my point was this: a remark was made earlier about using a Bugei for cutting. If you go to Bugei's website or surf Youtube, you can find a ton of pictures and videos with Bugei's founder James Williams cutting with various Bugei swords. The original idea with Bugei swords was to create an affordable option for us JSA practitioners to own a sword that could be used without resorting to an antique or a gunto that would need extensive refurbishing to be functional. In that context, yes these swords are "meant to be used."
    As far as considering it an "art object", I find it hard to consider anything mass-produced an art object. Which is not to say that one isn't entitled to buy and treasure one. But collecting rubber bands doesn't give you the right to cringe every time someone uses one at the office. Nor does your opinion that rubber bands are awesome change the fact that the rest of the world, including the people who make them, consider them, well... rubber bands. I realize this seems like a rather silly comparison, bit if you comsider the larger perspective you'll get my point. The most expensive production sword (at least that I've seen) is less than half the price of the cheapest unmounted Nihonto. And no these Nihonto are generally not considered art objects. Most people buying these are martial artists buying a tool to use.

  17. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jerry G. View Post
    A word on the previous debate: Whosoever plunks down the cash for a sword can do whatever they want with them within the bounds of law(or face the consequences). I personally don't cut with the nicer ones because I am not trained to do so and have no desire to bend and scratch up an expensive blade due to my technical incompetence. I DO cut with a Cheness blade remounted to the task. For me, there is a difference between a $300 blade and a $1000-$4000 blade...because I am not rich. I also see a difference between cutting milk jugs & pool noodles(hacker targets), cutting tatami or green bamboo(proper targets) and cutting tree limbs, shrubbery, 2x4s or discarded mannequin dressed like Elvis(destructive targets). Were I a millionaire, I may not make such a distinction but alas, I am not. Therefore, I choose not to beer bong Dom Perignon, light Cohibas with 50's, peel out & do doughnuts in a Ferrari, lick & stick rare stamps on the sewer bill or prune the underbrush with my Bugei. If I win the lottery, you guys'll be the first to know when I start snapping up all the nice blades in the SFI classifieds.
    While I agree that saplings, 2x4s etc. are not the wisest objects to cut, I think I speak for most of us when I state that a mannequin dressed as Elvis would be pretty hard to resist...

  18. #43
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    Here are a few pics, as promised, of my Citadel swords in various stages of undress in order of nagasa length. Because you can't tell so much with my pictures, here are some details that may not be obvious:

    The nagasa lengths are as follows, from tip to munemachi- katana(28.5"), wakizashi(21.5"), shobu tanto(7.75"), hira aikuchi(7.75") and kaiken(6.0").

    The tsuka lengths are as follows- katana(11.0"), wakizashi(6.75"), shobu tanto(4.5"), hira aikuchi(4.5") and kaiken(3.5").
    Attached Images Attached Images     
    Last edited by Jerry G.; 01-23-2009 at 12:27 PM.
    "Without a sign his sword the brave man draws,
    And asks no omen but his country’s cause."

    ---The Iliad of Homer, Book xii, Line 283


    "Democracy is two wolves and a lamb deciding what to have for dinner; Liberty is a well-armed lamb."
    ---Benjamin Franklin

  19. #44
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    All but the kaiken have ihori mune, the two largest have sugu hamon and the tanto all have sugu-esque hamon with more widely spaced gunome bumps...almost like a rounded-off togari. All have full same' wraps and the three with tsuba also have silk ito and bamboo mekugi(the two smallest ones have horn or delrin mekugi). The tsuba are hand-chiseled sukashi iron and the metal fittings(F/K, habaki, menuki, seppa) are either antiqued brass or copper with the katana having a matte black patina and the wakizashi a more glossy patina. The same' on the aikuchi is natural, lacquered black on the tanto and kaiken and bleached white on the katana and wakizashi. The katana and wakizashi also have high shinogi. All the saya are glossy black with horn fittings and brass shitodome except the wakizashi which is red with black specks or flakes in it...and the three short blades have saya with metal koiguchi.
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    Last edited by Jerry G.; 01-23-2009 at 12:18 PM.
    "Without a sign his sword the brave man draws,
    And asks no omen but his country’s cause."

    ---The Iliad of Homer, Book xii, Line 283


    "Democracy is two wolves and a lamb deciding what to have for dinner; Liberty is a well-armed lamb."
    ---Benjamin Franklin

  20. #45
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    Alex and his Bugei blade have entered youtube folklore - he likes swords and he likes to use em

    we are all aware that these are not art swords but to each one of us maybe a simple production sword
    means a lot more to us due to time, place or people it reminds us of -

    I bought my cold steel chisa kat the week my son was born and the roll of film I used for his first pics I also took a few of the sword - so now that sword holds special memories for me - I remember
    going home to an empty house while mother and baby were in hospital and stripping the tsuka and fittings to clean it till it was time to go back to see them again - wonderful , happy days .

    BTW Jerry

    I was halfway through a lasagne at work when I read your citadel post - mate I had to leave it for 5 minutes after I read the bit about slippey blunt nosed pliers - urggh
    " Put on the full armor of God so that you can take your stand against the devil's schemes. For our struggle is not against flesh and blood, but against principalities, against the authorities, against the powers of this dark world and against the spiritual forces of evil in the heavenly realms."



    Ephesians 6:11

  21. #46
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    Quote Originally Posted by michael wilson View Post
    BTW Jerry

    I was halfway through a lasagne at work when I read your citadel post - mate I had to leave it for 5 minutes after I read the bit about slippey blunt nosed pliers - urggh
    Hahahaha...they were all greasy and dirty, too, from sitting God knows how long in the bottom of his cycling pack. The BEST was watching stuff in my arm move through the adjacent skin as it was tugged toward the opening only to have the pliers pop off the stick and everything spring back to its original position several times. Once we finally got back to my riding buddy's house, we had to waste some of his Old Grandad pouring it onto and into the wound because I was hyper-paranoid of contracting some sort of flesh-eating virus and he didn't have any bactine or peroxide on hand. I can't say that all that escaped the bottle that evening was strictly for medicinal use, however.
    "Without a sign his sword the brave man draws,
    And asks no omen but his country’s cause."

    ---The Iliad of Homer, Book xii, Line 283


    "Democracy is two wolves and a lamb deciding what to have for dinner; Liberty is a well-armed lamb."
    ---Benjamin Franklin

  22. #47
    Hi all. So anyway, I meant no offence at all to anyone when I talked about self righteousness and baloney... The points I was trying to get across, albeit not very diplomatically, were more or less highlighted by Gary and Les...
    and well mentioned about the cheap Nihonto there Gary...

    I just wanted to follow up...a Bugei is not an art sword, though it may be pretty. They were all designed to be resilient cutters; ie swords meant to be used. Benjamin - you raised an intertesting point but I have to disagree with your implication that only full time sword teachers/senseis "need" to cut, starting simply with the argument that surely if the teacher *needs* to cut; all students would *need* to cut in order to learn. I dont want to go deeper into this *needs* thing as it becomes a philosophical debate... I just disagree and I think that everyone that owns a sword *needs* to know how to use it...and at the absolute least, know how hadle it..which would imply knowledge of use - but whatever.
    On to your next point - I know people like to shy away from this one because it sounds a little violent and conjures up terrible images, but frankly yes - the sword is still, at least partially, a weapon and is *meant* to be a weapon. I have a suspicion that if someone created a "katana" that could never harm a person then it wouldnt sell as well as the standard type. In addition, in complete speculation, I think that if the bugei people heard a report of one of their sword blades breaking on an armed home intruder they would not be best pleased - neither would their clientel!!

    Lastly - saplings ARE a viable target. Im not saying go trim your hedge or backyard brush with your bugei. I AM saying that I have seen skilled and respected Japanese sensei cut down both pine and banana tree saplings with their swords in videotaped cutting displays. a) they provide a resistance medium. b) they are not too large. c) they are biological, plant matter, and softer than blade steel. d) it looks cool.
    The first three are good enough reasons for me.
    I agree however that 2x4 is a shitty medium and one is likely to damage oneself or one's sword attempting this (HOWEVER it CAN be done with damage to neither...)

    So...back to the point of my initial post... It REALLY irks me when someone implies that I am somehow foolish for actually cutting with my bugei blade when this is what they were designed to do, and designed so well I might add. I believe it to be self righteous for a person to come before me and tell me that what I am doing with my own posession is somehow wrong, and that they would do it "this" way, and that "this" way is right and that my way is the wrong way (even foolish or indicative of lack of knowledge/experience etc etc). That IS self righteousness.

    Jerry, im also not rich, but I do appreciate good quality and good value - IMHO Bugei swords provide both of these factors.
    By the way... those pics you posted are beautiful...all lovely swords - dont ever let me near them, I would wanna cut with them all and I know how much you'de hate that

    Peace out.
    The Mind Truely Is The Sharpest Blade And The Deadliest Weapon.

  23. #48
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    the funny thing is, i've only done what i consider "heavy" cutting with the blades that impressed me most. in the past when i've picked up a blade that i felt was unimpressive- for various reasons from aesthetic to handling, etc.- i've typically passed it along- regardless of price- rather than even waste my time doing a lot of cutting with it. i've already established that i don't like the sword, so why would i abuse it to see how much it can put up with? . . . i'm not going to buy another. *shrug*. conversely i've picked up a few blades that just felt so good that i *had* to cut with them, even mediums that are inappropriate as far as traditional dojo cutting goes. i've done some cutting with *custom* blades that i think would make a lot of people on here cringe to hear about with a beater, let alone a custom piece. i would actually consider myself closer to poor than rich, monetarily speaking, so it's purely a personal choice. there have been instances where if an expensive blade would have failed, i would have felt pretty stupid for doing the cutting i did. *shrug*. that's why i was impressed in those instances.

    i used bricks, concrete blocks, ceramic tile, posts (maybe 4x4, can't recall), branches, saplings, bamboo, and straw mats all as cutting mediums with the bwt (technically, i used anything i could find in the barn of the farmstead i was living at at the time). the blade's finish was ruined, but there was *no* chipping at all to the edge. it had rather heavy niku; like bordering on a secondary bevel. not traditional, but for what it is, it's pretty spot on. saya was one of the better production saya i've seen as far as shaping and fit, although finish was. . . ok. kissaki was lightyears ahead of other brands *at the time*. being that my model was about five years ago, i hope they haven't changed too much.

    my twin brother just recently chipped the edge of a fred chen blade (i don't recall what vendor he got it from, but it has the higo theme available from just about everyone) when he a metal medium (i think he said either his grill or a metal stool. . . i guess he was using it as a cutting stand? i'm not too clear on the details.) and for the cut he claims he did, i'm impressed it wasn't chipped a lot more, although it is what i would consider fatal.
    les yeich (pronounced yike)

    helden wie wir sterben doch allein,
    einsam unerreicht werden wir sein.
    - the "great" jasmin wagner

  24. #49
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    East Coast
    Posts
    527
    Ah well, let's agree to disagree, Alex. I don't see either of us changing the other's mind and I don't think it's necessary anyway. My lunch break is too short to get into a semantic debate about "need" and "use" etc. Anyway, I do understand where you and others are coming from and why you would be irritated with people who say you shouldn't cut with any sword you own. Hopefully you can understand my irritation when people tell me that I *must* or *should* cut with any sword I own or anything else. It's a two-way street.

    Friendly disagreement aside, can we just get back to the thread's topic with people posting their favorite production blades with pictures?
    REAL Star Wars fans HATE Star Wars (and Lucas)... but LOVE the idea.

  25. #50
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Fredneck, MD
    Posts
    974
    Quote Originally Posted by Alex Kakashi View Post

    So...back to the point of my initial post... It REALLY irks me when someone implies that I am somehow foolish for actually cutting with my bugei blade when this is what they were designed to do, and designed so well I might add. I believe it to be self righteous for a person to come before me and tell me that what I am doing with my own posession is somehow wrong, and that they would do it "this" way, and that "this" way is right and that my way is the wrong way (even foolish or indicative of lack of knowledge/experience etc etc). That IS self righteousness.

    Jerry, im also not rich, but I do appreciate good quality and good value - IMHO Bugei swords provide both of these factors.
    By the way... those pics you posted are beautiful...all lovely swords - dont ever let me near them, I would wanna cut with them all and I know how much you'de hate that

    Peace out.
    First, to quote myself in response to you saying you cut tree branches with your Bugei greater than 3" in diameter-

    "Please humor me by saying the tree brances were inadvertently cut because they hung too near your tatami stand. I wouldn't even cut tree branches with my Cheness milkjugulator much less a fine blade like Bugei's Samurai!"

    My comment was merely my opinion on using that sword on that target...in humor...because it was my favorite. It is certainly capable of and intended for cutting; I just loved the blade so much that I didn't want to scratch it up. For me, it was a fine blade though others may disagree. I didn't say you were foolish and thought my attempt at humor was recognizable without the official winky "I'm kidding" smilie. As far as all the self-righteousness stuff, wow- either I didn't do a good enough job of making my point clear or you woke up on the wrong side of the bed. In either case, we don't know each other well enough to make some of the assumptions spoiling this thread so I'm just going to go back, delete my post and wish I'd never even typed it. Fair enough?

    [EDIT: Nevermind. Apparently I am not able to edit the post or delete it. My apologies to all.]
    Last edited by Jerry G.; 01-28-2009 at 11:52 AM.
    "Without a sign his sword the brave man draws,
    And asks no omen but his country’s cause."

    ---The Iliad of Homer, Book xii, Line 283


    "Democracy is two wolves and a lamb deciding what to have for dinner; Liberty is a well-armed lamb."
    ---Benjamin Franklin

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