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Thread: Replacement P1796 LC grip

  1. #51
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    Quote Originally Posted by Will Mathieson View Post
    I would suggest if the sword has a makers mark, to copy another sword of the same maker for the number of ribs. Most likely the sword is unmarked, find one that is very close in design and use the same number? Or, do you have a lucky number? Using a smaller number of ribs you can make them more pronounced/deeper. My 1796 has 11 raised ribs, but the method used was twine over wood, not carved in. Nearest the pommel there are no ribs, about the last inch. Pick the number that your favourite maker used for his?
    Thanks Will,
    The sabre is by Woolley & Co. I have seen Woolley sabres with varying amounts of ribs, but I think I am going to go with 10 or 11.
    Ian

  2. #52
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    Same maker

    Funny, I just traded a sword for a 1780 cavalry Wolley& Co sword. Some references date Wooley & Co to 1790-1797. I contacted Harvey Withers and his reference Swords for Sea Service dates Wooley to 1785-1797. The grip is fishskin over twine for the ribs. The reference I do not have but I am told it is expensive, too bad there is not a reprint or reproduced on a website.

  3. #53
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    Hello Will,
    I have just bought another sword at auction for restoration (another new grip). That too is Woolley & Co.

    Latest installment:
    I have settled on 10 ribs for the grip. The ribs are nearly finished and I have managed to cut the 'ridge' into the grip to receive the pommel. Just the leather covering to be applied.
    Ian
    Attached Images Attached Images     
    Last edited by Ian Knight; 11-12-2009 at 01:42 AM.

  4. #54
    Fascinating thread Ian. I am really enjoying seeing how this process works and it looks like you have made a very nice grip. With regard to the tang how did you manage to remove the backpiece ready for the grip and still have the tang protuding ready for peening (if that is the right word)? Or am I missing something?

  5. #55
    Quote Originally Posted by Will Mathieson View Post
    I contacted Harvey Withers and his reference Swords for Sea Service dates Wooley to 1785-1797. .
    Quote Originally Posted by Will Mathieson View Post
    The reference I do not have but I am told it is expensive, too bad there is not a reprint or reproduced on a website.
    Swords for Sea service and a few other references were used as the initial building blocks for the makers list on my site (www.oldswords.com). Since then I have corrected mistakes, added new makers and performed additional research. Every maker that was in SforSS is on my site. Growing all the time.
    (apologies for the plug)

    I think the dates for 'Woolley and Co.' needed to be taken loosly. James Woolley had a number of partners between about 1790 and about 1834 and he didn't always list his partners names in trade directories, official corrspondents or marks.

  6. #56
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mark Cloke View Post
    Fascinating thread Ian. I am really enjoying seeing how this process works and it looks like you have made a very nice grip. With regard to the tang how did you manage to remove the backpiece ready for the grip and still have the tang protuding ready for peening (if that is the right word)? Or am I missing something?
    Thanks Mark,
    I actually bought the sword for David Critchley via the classified section. The sword was in parts and the tang was already protruding though the pommel.
    Whoever opened the sword obviously knew what he or she was doing. Apparently the tang can be lengthened by heating and hammering.
    Another method of lengthening the tang, but only as a last resort, is to file down the shoulders of the backpiece slightly where it meets the ferrule, thereby allowing more tang to protrude through the pommel.
    It sounds like I am a bit of an expert but all the knowledge that I have gained is due mainly to the help given to me by SFI members, in particular Robert Wilkinson-Latham and Richard Lowe.

    Ian

  7. #57
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  8. #58
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    Quote Originally Posted by Matt Easton View Post
    You've made a really really nice job of that so far Ian, well done!
    Matt


    Thanks Matt,
    Now comes the tricky part. Applying the leather to the grip and hoping that the sword all goes together again afterwards.
    Ian

  9. #59
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    Almost there, just the finishing touches to go.

    Ian
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  10. #60
    Ian,
    I am very impressed! The grip looks perfect. So when does your grip-making business officially open?

    Jonathan

  11. #61
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    Quote Originally Posted by J.G. Hopkins View Post
    Ian,
    I am very impressed! The grip looks perfect. So when does your grip-making business officially open?

    Jonathan
    Thanks Jonathan,
    I'm quite pleased as its my first attempt. I just need to find a way to 'age' the leather a bit.
    Taking orders soon. (only joking!)

    I am taking delivery of another P1796 in need of a new grip tomorrow. See below.

    Ian
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    Last edited by Ian Knight; 11-12-2009 at 07:47 AM.

  12. #62
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    Wonderful! You are a modest man.

    Did you wet the leather prior to forming it to the grip? What type of glue did you use? I am especially pleased to see that the leather didn't bunch up on the "head" of the grip.

  13. #63
    Quote Originally Posted by Ian Knight View Post
    Almost there, just the finishing touches to go.

    Ian
    Looks like you've done an excellent job Ian.

    How long did you leave the grip bound before removing the binding? You should really leave it at least a couple of days at least or get the wire on ASAP to prevent the leather shrinking and pulling back out of the grooves as it dries.

    But it looks very professional.

  14. #64
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dmitry Z~G View Post
    Wonderful! You are a modest man.

    Did you wet the leather prior to forming it to the grip? What type of glue did you use? I am especially pleased to see that the leather didn't bunch up on the "head" of the grip.
    Thanks Dmitry,
    No, I didn't wet the leather. I coated the leather and the grip with PVA glue, stretched & pushed the leather over the grip as well as I could and then bound it with cord. I 'pushed' the leather over the head of the grip as it dried.
    The glue was drying as I applied the leather, so I had to be quick, but this also aided obtaining the compound curve. The glue makes the leather very stretchy.
    Ian

  15. #65
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    Quote Originally Posted by R. Lowe View Post
    Looks like you've done an excellent job Ian.

    How long did you leave the grip bound before removing the binding? You should really leave it at least a couple of days at least or get the wire on ASAP to prevent the leather shrinking and pulling back out of the grooves as it dries.

    But it looks very professional.
    Thanks Richard,
    I didn't leave it as long as I should have (about 6 hours) but I had previously done a practise run on a piece of scrap wood and leather.
    I was impatient to see what it looked like. I have since rebound it.
    The sabre is a trooper's and so wouldn't have wire on the grip.
    Ian
    Last edited by Ian Knight; 11-12-2009 at 09:50 AM.

  16. #66
    Quote Originally Posted by Ian Knight View Post
    Thanks Richard,
    I was impatient to see what it looked like. I have since rebound it.
    The sabre is a trooper's and so wouldn't have wire on the grip.
    Ian
    i forgot about that!

    Excellent work anyway.

  17. #67
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    Whats Next??

    Gilt and blueing?? Go all the way, I'm shure there will be a line up for the grips and more!, I forgot, lucky this one is a troopers sword, sans gilt and blue. The grip you made is great, I guess now there will be no hesitation to purchase swords without grips. I'm attending a militaria show this Sat. in Markham, Ont. and will keep an eye out for gripless swords! You have given me the inspiration needed, to attempt a grip from scratch.

  18. #68
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    Quote Originally Posted by Will Mathieson View Post
    Gilt and blueing?? Go all the way, I'm shure there will be a line up for the grips and more!, I forgot, lucky this one is a troopers sword, sans gilt and blue. The grip you made is great, I guess now there will be no hesitation to purchase swords without grips. I'm attending a militaria show this Sat. in Markham, Ont. and will keep an eye out for gripless swords! You have given me the inspiration needed, to attempt a grip from scratch.
    Give it a try Will. It's not as difficult as you would imagine.
    I've just taken another British P1796 sabre apart today in preparation for regripping.
    Below, before and after of my first project.

    Ian
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    Last edited by Ian Knight; 11-16-2009 at 08:56 AM.

  19. #69
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    Ian, how are you going to secure the tang to the pommel?

  20. #70
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dmitry Z~G View Post
    Ian, how are you going to secure the tang to the pommel?
    Hello Dmitry,
    I'm going to whack it with a big hammer.

    I will leave it loose for the time being as I am using the grip as a 'model' for my next project. Eventually I will peen the tang over.
    Ian

  21. #71
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    Outstanding job Ian!

    I am duly impressed with your restoration.
    "You can't please everyone, so you have to please yourself." Ricky Nelson

  22. #72
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    Quote Originally Posted by George Wheeler View Post
    Outstanding job Ian!

    I am duly impressed with your restoration.
    That's very kind of you George, thank you. I enjoyed making it.
    Ian

  23. #73
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    Ian, you may already have experience peening things, but after peening a few things myself I've learnt a little bit and am happy to share tips if you need.

    Matt

  24. #74
    Quote Originally Posted by Ian Knight View Post
    Give it a try Will. It's not as difficult as you would imagine.
    I've just taken another British P1796 sabre apart today in preparation for regripping.
    Below, before and after of my first project.

    Ian
    Really excellent job Ian

    David

  25. #75
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    Quote Originally Posted by Matt Easton View Post
    Ian, you may already have experience peening things, but after peening a few things myself I've learnt a little bit and am happy to share tips if you need.

    Matt
    Thanks Matt,
    PM sent.
    Ian

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