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Thread: Kris Cutlery Blade Geometry

  1. #1
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    Kris Cutlery Blade Geometry

    Let me start by saying that I have never held a KC sword but I do really like the look of them the sleak styalized look of the koshirae and the tsuba looks quite modern. The only thing about them that bothers me was a review I saw online about the non traditional blade geometry, not sure if that is the case as I have never seen the KC Swords in life or actually handled one. Would love to know if that is the case on all their katana though. I am aware there are those who hate the stylized look of the KC koshirae but I have actually seen histoical koshirae and tsuba with a similar style. I have yet to see any in Japan which are similar to anything CAS Hanwei puts out. They just have a look all their own. Again that is just a personal prefrence I guess. My question is has anyone handled an KC kat or own one and what is the blade like in terms of it's shape.

  2. #2
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    FWIW, just about every production katana in the world has "non traditional blade geometry".

    In fact, the KC Bingo Mihara blade I have has a "traditional" look IMO due to geometric yokote and very nice sori. Some niku thrown in doesn't hurt either. Not much of a "diamond" cross-section though.
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  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by Timo Qvintus View Post
    FWIW, just about every production katana in the world has "non traditional blade geometry".

    In fact, the KC Bingo Mihara blade I have has a "traditional" look IMO due to geometric yokote and very nice sori. Some niku thrown in doesn't hurt either. Not much of a "diamond" cross-section though.
    The review I mention I am unfortunately no longer able to find on google but basicly the article mentions two possible problems with KC swords. He wrote that they are fairley typical of Philipineo production knives and swords in that the metal is pretty soft and likely to take a bend or not hold an edge. A photo of a KC European sword, I believe the Celtic blade, is shown with a nasty bend in one photo. The writer also noted that because the blade is not sharpened at a tradional angle it is much easier to resharpen at home as the KC katana do not have the tradional appleseed cross section found on a typical katana but more of an undercut edge. Agaian, I have no idea if this is an accurate critique of the Kris Cutlery product it was simply one of the only ones I found at the time...and am no longer able to find. lol The blade geometry I refered to had less to do with the sori or the yokote than it did the edge. Hope that clarifies my question a little more. Cheers
    Last edited by A. Lones; 10-10-2009 at 08:02 AM. Reason: correction

  4. #4
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    I don't collect European style swords so I wouldn't know about those. KC's katana are clay tempered so the edge is harder and holds a better edge than TH-blades. The appleseed-cross-section mentioned is nowhere to be seen in virtually any production katana. As for the sharpening, my blade is sharpened the regular way and I've yet to hear anyone say that their KC katana was sharpened wrong.
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  5. #5
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    No, not sharpened wrong just not sharpened at the normal angle a sword would be at and is more in line with the way knives are sharpened. I beleive I have read that DF, Cheness (with the exception of their SGC line) and Hanwei (with the exception of their PP line) all sharpen so that the blade has that appleseed shape in cross section from what I have read. My Cheness Kaze certainly has that appleseed shape to it's cutting edge and the DF sword I handled did as well. I do not recall with the Tori I handled from Hanwei as I was unaware of that at the time. I have also read that this shape is traditionally common in swords almost world wide which is why I was concerned why KC had gone the other route. From my readings of your past posts Timo I believe you have several different blades in your personal collection, if so have a look see to better understand I know my written discription is poor at best but that was my concern with the KC katana. I am aware that KC has a great name for their work here and that was the only negative comment I had read other than the tsuka maybe glued on in some models but even Hanwei does that with their lower end swords. Hope I clarified my earlier coment. Cheers

  6. #6
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    i think you're referring to a *very* old review. in my experience (i think between my brother and myself we've owned and done extensive cutting with 10-15 different swords from kc) kc blades are extremely tough, and i've yet to encounter one that could be considered soft. on the earlier models they were made with very little niku, or alternately very beefy, but with a secondary bevel. i have also seen older euro blades from them that had somewhat prominent secondary bevels. i wouldn't say this is an issue any longer. any blades i've seen from them in at least the last five years has been what i would consider pretty "traditional".
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  7. #7
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    OK, in that case, KC katana blades have what you call apple-seed shaped edge.

    From your description I would guess that the article/review you refer to discussed KC's western-style blades (where knife-like sharpening is common and blades are not clay tempered).
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  8. #8
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    The profile varies from blade to blade. I haven't got any of their swords yet, but I have a tanto and a naginata blade. The tanto has a very true appleseed shape with lots of niku, but the naginata has less of both.

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