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Thread: Sword identification

  1. #1

    Sword identification

    Hi guys,

    I am working on getting some pictures up, but until then I will do my best to describe it. I dont know alot about swords, but my father has one that has been passed down to him from his grandfather. It is said to have been passed down further than that, but without proof it is just a rumor.

    The sword is approximately 30"-34" in length, it is actually two identical swords in one, but both swords are flat on one side so they meet up together perfectly. the handle looks very old, it is made from wood, with gold ends.

    Again, next time I get over to my parents place I will get some pictures in here.

    Thanks!

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2002
    Location
    Nipmuc USA
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    11,903
    Hi Justin,

    Welcome To Sword Forum International

    The length and description read to me a bit like a double jian pair from China. I don't have a great number of files saved for these. In the case below, the grips are halved but the blades themselves are of a flattened diamond shape in cross section.

    Cheers

    Hotspur; I could as easily be way off base
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  3. #3
    wow, if you removed the handguard and the woven patterns in the gold, that sword is remarkably close, Even down to the blade cover. Although I am pretty sure the blades are flat as well. Thank you Glen, any idea's about its age?
    Last edited by JustinT.; 11-18-2009 at 08:21 AM.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb 2002
    Location
    Nipmuc USA
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    11,903
    Hi Justin,

    While we may be in the ball park as to type, age can appear to be very old when it is really rather recent. I don't know your family timeline, nor when it might have been collected. Even in photos, it can be tough to place an item in time. The sword pictured is listed by someone as late 18th century. Yet that could be simply on a basis of some traits displayed.

    My guess on the type was based simply by your dimension listed. There were some earlier European examples of cased swords and they also are occasionally found with the asymmetrical flattened side.

    With no, or smaller guard; this might also belong to a different variety from another area and timeline but we're probably going in the right direction. A few pictures will/should help immensely. I wouldn't speculate beyond what is available.

    Are there possibly lines/markings on the blades with seven dots?

    Cheers

    Hotspur; something that could be quite new, in the grand scheme of things

  5. #5
    I went and took some pictures at lunch today, I hope these help.
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  6. #6
    last one
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  7. #7
    Bump

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Vancouver Island, British Columbia
    Posts
    84
    At a guess, and working off of the slightly blurry photos... probably Chinese, or from a related design tradition. I do question the complete lack of any sort of guard on it, looking at the double jians that Glen C posted, and a few Chinese swords around the site, all of which have the crescent-like guards of the doubles, a smaller guard that just overhangs the scabbard, or a nihonto-like small, flat guard.

    As to age... not the foggiest, beyond "probably more than twenty years."

  9. #9
    Chinese. Late Qing Dynasty (probably 19thC). Shuangjian - double swords.
    It looks from the pics that they are genuine but of course one can't be entirely sure without actually handling the swords. As David says, they are missing their guards. They should each have half-guards, flat on one side. The portion of the blades next to the ferrules appears slightly darker, perhaps indicating where these guards used to be.

    The suspension fittings don't seem to fit as well as they should. It is possible that they have been taken off and put back the wrong way round.

    The fittings are quite plain and simple compared to many late Qing shuangjian (which I rather like). There would also have been a brass chape covering the end of the scabbard.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Midwest, U.S.A.
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    318
    I see so many of this style of jian on the market today, whether it is a single or double. What was its original function in society, for example were they tourist pieces, regalia, or side arms etc. Thanks for the insight.

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