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Thread: weird sword?

  1. #1

    weird sword?

    i have recently come across a quite old sword, any ideas what it could be?

    Last edited by Artem M.; 01-09-2010 at 08:14 PM. Reason: image needed

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2002
    Location
    Nipmuc USA
    Posts
    11,851
    Hi Arten

    Welcome To Sword Forum International

    This is an Independant Order of Odd Fellows sword. Likely third quarter of the 19th century.

    http://www.ioof.org/

    Does this one read as Henderson Ames Co. Kalamazoo Miich. ? I cant quite make that out from your picture. The diagonal script at the base of the blade. The sword type evolved from the militia pattern first used well before the American Civil War.

    The Odd Fellows society has an interesting background and grew throughout the 19th century in America. It is not unusual to read biographies of folk that were involved with both the Freemasons and other organizations. The Odd Fellows of England started as an alternative to the Freemasons and that group was originally chartered in the 1780s (iirc) by George III. While loosely affiliated, the IOOF is a separate entity to the old school group.

    Cheers

    Hotspur; there is a later Patriarch Militant rank of that group with a somewhat different sword

  3. #3
    i paid 40 dollars for the sword , is that bad or good pricing?
    whats the average price of such a sword?

  4. #4
    Quote Originally Posted by Glen C. View Post
    Hi Arten



    Does this one read as Henderson Ames Co. Kalamazoo Miich. ? I cant quite make that out from your picture. The diagonal script at the base of the blade. The sword type evolved from the militia pattern first used well before the American Civil War.
    it says "the ward stillson co. anderson, ind."

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb 2002
    Location
    Nipmuc USA
    Posts
    11,851
    Well then,

    Ward Stilson appears to be fairly late and a brief look on Google shows a 20th century timeline, up into at least the 1950s. Swords such as these and marked to the local retailers would have their company logo etched in that panel of the blade, while the sword itself and much of the blade decoration would most often be done by sword makers. Ward seems to have been listed as a manufacturer but I have a hunch the swords were not actually made there.

    As to pricing, we don't post regarding worth here and there really is a huge range these swords may fetch. You might see some examples of sales by watching fraternal swords on Ebay, or cruising antique arms dealers. At some arms shows, these fraternal swords pile up by the hundreds under tables.

    As mentioned, the basic form was basically the same general look of the pre civil war swords. I do not know the extent to which there is still demand and use by the societies but they are still considered jewels and trappings of ranks and levels.

    Cheers

    Hotspur; the plate attached here shows (am-102) a crossguard quite like your sword and still produced through the Ames Sword Co. to this day (although of a white palstic compostition)
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