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Thread: FS: Burmese Dha with inlaid patern near the hilt

  1. #1
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    FS: Burmese Dha with inlaid patern near the hilt











    24 inch blade
    7 inch hilt

    $450 + Shipping Thanks for looking

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  3. #3

    Thumbs up Quite a handsome sword.

    Hey Nathaniel,

    Approximately, how old is this Dha? Late 19th or early 20th century? Is the blade mono-steel or folded/ lamular? Is the highly-detailed grip brass or nickel-alloy? The scabbard fittings look brass. Very nice piece (drool).

    Be well and practice often, Jon Palombi
    Last edited by jonpalombi; 02-13-2010 at 05:37 AM.
    "A wise person aspires the study of swordsmanship. A lucky person finds a worthy teacher, an unlucky person finds yet another student... in the guise of a genuine Master. Sadly, a fool cannot tell the difference either way." Anecdotes of The Unknown Swordsman

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    Jon,

    I'm not exactly sure how old the sword is...but this is something that is always hard to pinpoint with south east asian swords....aka Dha in Burmese or Daab in Thai.....it's definitely not like the modern new swords that you see coming out of Thailand that have turned wood/ metal handles and blades that are just cut from sheets of metal and have no blade profile whatsoever.

    The blade is actually of very good quality..when I first saw the handle and scabbard, I wasn't as impressed...and when I pulled out the blade the chrome looking polish reminded me of some stainless steel mirror polishes...but when you then you notice how good the blade really is...it has a very nice niku, sora, central fuller, false back edge, sharp and the inlaid of copper & silver on both sides near the hilt...these are far from the characteristics of a simple tourist blade.

    With the shorter handle of 7 inches and 24 inch blade this is more of a Burman versus thai piece...also the wire inlaid is a exclusively Burmese decoration technique, sometimes called Koftgari.

    These blade looks to be a monosteel, though sometimes they have an inset edge.

    The handle I'm guessing since it's luster compared to the metal scabbard bands suggest that it might be a nickel alloy....the scabbard bands might then be brass...which highlights another significant point int that all the scabbard bands are present...most burmese and thai swords you see the scabbard bands are either all gone, slide around or missing a few....with this sword all are intact and secure.

    I hope this answers all your questions...the Burmese/ Thai blades are close relatives to the Chinese Dao....the chinese dao as we know it today is influenced by the Indian/persian sword...you see this evident with some of the emperor Qianlong's swords with the jade horse head handle and jade daggers.

  5. #5
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    Lots of views, but no interest? Don't be shy, make an offer :P

  6. #6
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    Added some better pictures Very good quality piece...especially the blade!












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  8. #8
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    I'm interested.

    I've had bad luck with Dha's in the past so I'm a little reluctant to take a swing.


    My two prior issues have been the heat treatment, the end cap of the handle , and how the blade is secured.


    One of my personal quirks is that all my blades, new or antique (with a few Japanese exceptions) I have cut with at least once. I see little sense in buying a blade for "decoration" unless its value justifies its idleness.

    Any additional information is greatly appreciated.

    Thanks.
    I'm lost---- I've gone to look for myself. If I should return before I get back, please ask me to wait.

    If you think education is expensive, try ignorance.

    I work for Keyser Söze.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by D. Opheim View Post
    I'm interested.

    I've had bad luck with Dha's in the past so I'm a little reluctant to take a swing.


    My two prior issues have been the heat treatment, the end cap of the handle , and how the blade is secured.


    One of my personal quirks is that all my blades, new or antique (with a few Japanese exceptions) I have cut with at least once. I see little sense in buying a blade for "decoration" unless its value justifies its idleness.

    Any additional information is greatly appreciated.

    Thanks.

    D. Opheim,

    To answer you question, here is a section of an article on Dha from the History of Steal in Eastern Asia: http://www.arscives.com/historysteel...ea.article.htm

    "Despite intense and often heated argument to the contrary, a “perfect” sword really doesn’t exist. Swords develop to suit the environment and user. It cannot be seriously disputed that the primary purpose of a dha is as a weapon. Some hints as to how these swords were used can be found by looking closely at construction and design. The peoples of continental Southeast Asia did not, historically, have to contend with heavy armor or thick, dense textile clothing. As a result, dha are generally light weapons with short spike tangs and a center of balance located close to the handle. A design well suited to cuts against unprotected flesh. Notable exceptions do exist, including some large, massive examples that probably filled niches occupied by cavalry sabers and short pole arms in other cultures. To the casual observer, most swords in the category would appear to favor single hand techniques with an emphasis on slashing and “draw” cuts. This is particularly true of the “Shan” and Thai style weapons. The swords used by some Kachin and “Montagnard” tribesmen are often heavier and seem better suited to a chopping technique.

    Real-world data is important when discussing sword use, as the tendency to draw conclusions based solely on speculation is all too tempting. Accordingly, the authors tested a wide array of dha, including antique examples of most known forms, contemporary examples from Thailand and custom swords made with the finest of modern materials and techniques. The test sample numbered approximately thirty sword-length weapons and, while the sample size tested was small and the tester largely inexperienced, some useful information was realized.

    Test cutting with a variety of different cutting media (including foam pool “noodles”, rolled beach mats, water-filled plastic bottles and rolled newspaper) yielded impressive but largely expected results. All forms of the sword, antique, contemporary and custom alike, cut all media well. The Kachin and Montagnard variants were, indeed, better suited than their Shan and Thai counterparts to a chopping technique, but cut surprisingly well with a slash or draw-cut. The informal tests revealed that the dha is well suited for its intended purpose: cutting.

    One of the pre-test concerns was the stability of the handle/blade junction. With the exception of some truly old swords with deteriorated pitch fixation material, even poor technique did not cause any remarkable failure. The few full-tang swords tested included both peened and threaded pommel examples, and this feature appeared to contribute more to weapon balance than cutting ability. Further in this regard, most dha favored single-hand techniques, despite the frequent occurrence of lengthy handles. Held close to the blade, the long handles on most examples provided an excellent counter-balance to the blade, making for a fast “feeling” weapon. Notable exceptions were encountered, and the longer Shan and Thai swords welcomed two-handed use. Similarly, some of the Montagnard swords had handles equal or longer than the blade, and these were unwieldy if not used with two hands, similar to a short pole-arm.

    That the dha has long seen dual use as a weapon and tool is unsurprising. Many of the tribesmen indigenous to the region carry dha as a general sidearm and tool used to satisfy a variety of cutting needs. For instance, members of the various Kachin (Jinghpaw) tribes are unlikely to be seen without a “hunting” sword at their side, often decorated with tiger teeth or sections of tiger jaw to illustrate their hunting abilities. Diran (1997) During World War II, Kachin tribesmen were recruited by the allies to defend the “Burma Road”. The British found the local weapons particularly suited to the environment and, for a short time, issued military-grade dha for use by some British troops, much as the U.S. and other forces employed machetes. "

    Hope this helps

    Please feel free to PM/ email or post if further questions.

    Nathaniel

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    ....bump

  12. #12

    burmese dha

    hi i'm selling a burmese dha early 19th c

    Nicely worked Hilt and Sheath of mamas (an alloy of silver and brass)

    The blade displays silver figures of royalty receiving tribute, interspursed with Burmese writing (Pali)

    Beautiful authentic sword to add to a collection.

    $600 ono.

  13. #13

    burmese dha

    pics
    Attached Images Attached Images     

  14. #14
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    Lance, thanks for sharing your own Burmese sword....I would suggest starting your own thread...you will have more views then.

    The sword I have for sale, has a very good blade, the inlaid and handle are simple. The blade is longer than the typical sword. It has a nice fuller. To me the blade is the highlight...this sword is not your newer tourist piece, but has a solid functional construction as well as decorative features....reasonable price for a piece that is complete and in original condition.

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    Reasonable offers will be entertained

  17. #17
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    $425 Bump

  18. #18

    The Burmese sword.

    I could offer you $250.00 but that is all.

  19. #19
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    Jim, it's a little better form to contact via PM or email with your offer. I said reasonable offers...$250 might be more reasonable for a simple sword rattan wrapped scabbard & handle and plain blade. Since no one seems genuinely interested, I've decided to take this one off the classifieds along with the others. I'm don't need the cash, but yet I'm not going to sell them for less than I paid

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