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    Are we sure that this isn't Juan Martinez??

    Are we sure that this isn't Juan Martinez??
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    English, very late 1700s - early 1800s....

    English, very late 1700s - early 1800s. Everything about the style of the sword and scabbard, says British manufacture.

    --ElJay
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    Looks like what's left of a Pappenheimer type...

    Looks like what's left of a Pappenheimer type rapier.
  4. Blade length? Thanks!

    Blade length?
    Thanks!
  5. My 2 cents: the style of the running wolf on the...

    My 2 cents: the style of the running wolf on the blade is earlier (at the latest ca. 1750??) than the hilt (early 1800s). As you noted in your last post, it is either an earlier blade mounted in a...
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    Possibly English, early 1600s. In England in the...

    Possibly English, early 1600s. In England in the early 1600s there was a short period where it was fashionable to have a simple cross hilt instead of the complex hilts of rapiers and baskethilts. Six...
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    An example of the main knucklebow not being...

    An example of the main knucklebow not being attached by a screw and the side knuck attached with a screw just showed up here on SFI. Take a look at the last photo of the thread entitled "17th/18th...
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    Just my own general thoughts on this: if a...

    Just my own general thoughts on this: if a "Walloon" has screws, it's from the 1600s. If it doesn't have screws, it can be from the 16 or 1700s; you have to consider all of the design elements of the...
  9. Thanks, Tom!

    Thanks, Tom!
  10. Does anybody have one similar to this for sale?

    English cavalry sword, simple hilt, from the 1700s. Curved or straight blades are both acceptable.
    Please let me know if you have a similar sword for sale.
    Thanks!

    --ElJay
  11. Here's another thought on your sword: it may be a...

    Here's another thought on your sword: it may be a grenadier's sword. The blade lengths were often around 30" (thus allowing for your shortened blade), and in the first half of the 1700s tended to...
  12. Nice sword! What you've probably got there is an...

    Nice sword! What you've probably got there is an English hanger from the first half of the 1700s. The blade markings are something I've seen on other English swords from that time frame, too.

    How...
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    As Glen said, an axe for squaring timber. The...

    As Glen said, an axe for squaring timber. The proper name is a goosewing broadaxe, and from that nice curl at the tip of the blade, it's likely Austrian or central European.

    Hope this helps! ...
  14. That's a rather decent English "Hounslow" type...

    That's a rather decent English "Hounslow" type hanger. Any blade markings?

    --ElJay
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    I would check out Spanish swords from the late...

    I would check out Spanish swords from the late 1700s to early 1800s. I used to have one that was a twin to the OP's, but the blade had the usual "No Me Saques" etc... etched in the wide fuller.
    ...
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    Is this hilt stamped "CJ Mitchells patent"? I...

    Is this hilt stamped "CJ Mitchells patent"?
    I find it very interesting that someone would resurrect a hilt design that was over 70 years old and patent it!

    --ElJay
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    Looks to me like a US officer's sword, ca. 1800....

    Looks to me like a US officer's sword, ca. 1800.

    Others will undoubtably provide a more accurate ID!

    --ElJay
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    Hello David, NIce Mort in superb condition! Is...

    Hello David,
    NIce Mort in superb condition! Is this one the same sword that Cathey pictured on the first page?

    I'm an ex-saber fencer (I still teach it to students who want to give it a try), and...
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    Time for a bump!

    Time for a bump!
  20. My vote is to agree that you've got an English...

    My vote is to agree that you've got an English hanger that could date from the mid 1600s through the early 1700s.

    Is the knucklebow a replacement? It looks a bit off stylistically.

    --ElJay
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    Hello John, Probably a European import. You can...

    Hello John,
    Probably a European import. You can find any number of European blade types in Scottish and English baskethilts!
    Have you examined the Baskethilt thread? Lots of European blades...
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    Hello John, I think that when you get Alan's...

    Hello John,
    I think that when you get Alan's photos you'll find that the engraved Harvey and the crowned GR won't match what you've got. The fullering on a Harvey blade is also different from what...
  23. It could be that the C refers to "C Troop". Then...

    It could be that the C refers to "C Troop". Then you'd have St. George, C troop, sword #35.

    If the blade has three shallow fullers at the forte, it could be as early as the 1740s. Harvey was...
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    Hello Martin, Well, that's exactly the sort of...

    Hello Martin,
    Well, that's exactly the sort of thing that would work for my hilt. However, the one you've shown now has a rivet hole that would need to be plugged, and the pitting/wear on the blade...
  25. Possibly "Coulaux & Cie"? Coulaux was a...

    Possibly "Coulaux & Cie"?
    Coulaux was a Klingenthal bladesmith/swordsmith that operated in the 1800s, and used the Coulaux & Cie (and variants thereof) from the 1840s or so onwards.

    --ElJay
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