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Thread: Wilkinson Blade Types

  1. #51
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  2. #52
    Quote Originally Posted by Matt Easton View Post
    Hi John, in the last year I have seen two very similar Wilkinson blades, both dated to 1863 as it happens. The first appeared to be a light cavalry sword with an unusual symmetrical 5-bar hilt (so like a normal 1821 guard, but with the same branches on the inside as on the outside) and the second was etched to the Royal Artillery and had an unusual four-bar 1821-style hilt.

    I have also noticed in auction this year a couple of unusual blades from Garden & Co.

    Regards,
    Matt
    Matt,

    One of the swords you refer to was in fact described in the Wilkinson records as " Lt. Cavalry 4 barred double guard" and it had a 34 1/2" x 1 1/8" slightly curved " Russian Pattern" blade, which is very much like a flat solid blade, but it has one narrow fuller on each side close to the back edge of the blade.

  3. #53
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  4. #54
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
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    Hopefully enclosed are a few images of another 'percy' type straight bladed sword manufactured by Henry Wilkinson, Pall Mall, London. This one I picked up at the start of the year from a dealer, its original owner was acting Lt. Col George Lionel Bonham.
    Attached Images Attached Images     
    Last edited by Bryan T; 12-16-2012 at 02:25 PM. Reason: grammer

  5. #55
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  6. #56
    Looks like an 1890s P1821 HC hilt.

  7. #57

    Percy pattern

    Quote Originally Posted by Bryan T View Post
    Hopefully enclosed are a few images of another 'percy' type straight bladed sword manufactured by Henry Wilkinson, Pall Mall, London. This one I picked up at the start of the year from a dealer, its original owner was acting Lt. Col George Lionel Bonham.
    Hello Brian,

    May I ask who Colonel George Lionel Bonham served with?

  8. #58
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Hampshire
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    Is this your man?

    I can only find

    he was a Colonel in the Turkish Gendarmerie.

    Major George Lionel Bonham was born on 6 August 1873.1 He was the son of Sir George Francis Bonham, 2nd Bt. and Louisa Buchanan.1 He married Amy Gaskell, daughter of Captain Henry Brooks Gaskell, on 11 June 1898.1 He died on 23 January 1910 at age 36, without issue.

    He gained the rank of Major in the service of the Grenadier Guards.1 He gained the rank of Staff Officer between 1907 and 1909 in the service of the Macedonian Gendarmerie.1 He was Colonel of the Turkish Gendarmerie of Smyrna between 1909 and 1910.1

  9. #59
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    UK
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    124
    Hi all,
    Have been off-line all day otherwise would have replied earlier..

    Many thanks Robert,
    The G.L. Bonham was the individual from the Grenadier Guards who was wounded in the South African War. After buying the sword also picked up a copy of 'May and Amy' by Josceline Dimbleby for the information and photos it contained about Bonham and his wife Amy. I didn't realise that he was a full Colonel, had missed this aspect when looking at his career path.

    Matt & John,
    The sword has a Cavalry guard with a Percy blade with the dimensions of 33" long by 1" wide. Wilkinson register number 40076 dated to 12th April 1904, but blank for the name, except as etched on the blade.
    In comparison to other Wilkinson swords I own, this one feels very 'light' and so very fast to use across the quarters, almost as a balance between being used on horseback and on foot in an infantry role.

  10. #60
    Quote Originally Posted by Bryan T View Post
    Hi all,
    Have been off-line all day otherwise would have replied earlier..

    Many thanks Robert,
    The G.L. Bonham was the individual from the Grenadier Guards who was wounded in the South African War. After buying the sword also picked up a copy of 'May and Amy' by Josceline Dimbleby for the information and photos it contained about Bonham and his wife Amy. I didn't realise that he was a full Colonel, had missed this aspect when looking at his career path.

    Matt & John,
    The sword has a Cavalry guard with a Percy blade with the dimensions of 33" long by 1" wide. Wilkinson register number 40076 dated to 12th April 1904, but blank for the name, except as etched on the blade.
    In comparison to other Wilkinson swords I own, this one feels very 'light' and so very fast to use across the quarters, almost as a balance between being used on horseback and on foot in an infantry role.
    Hi Bryan,

    Thanks for the info on Bonham. Can you possibly qualify 'Cavalry guard', do you mean the 1821 pattern as used by the Heavy Cavalry in ealier years?

  11. #61
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    UK
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    124
    Gordon,
    Many thanks for the question. Will try and be as specifiic as possible:

    The guard is of the HC Undress P1821 in being of a steel scroll pattern with a sword knot slit near the pommel, yet the thickness of the guard is not as thick as other HC Wilkinson items I have from the 1860s to 1870s. It is also similiar to the HC Undress P1887 (Robson, 1975, p.77) yet the srcolls are 'tighter' and more compact in appearance. In comparison to other Wilkinson cavalry swords I have of the very late Victorian period, it has the same thinner material cross-sectional depth to the guard and is without the fuller circular section of the earlier HC guards, being more consistent with the HC P1896 adopted by all the cavalry regiments (Robson, 1975, p.79).

    If I were to label it, I would guess at 'a 1896 pattern cavalry sword with a Percy straight double edged blade'.

    Hope this helps..

    Bryan

    PS if you wish to see any more photos, like the guard, I can take some more during the Xmas break?
    Last edited by Bryan T; 12-17-2012 at 03:38 PM.

  12. #62
    Join Date
    Mar 2002
    Location
    Southern Maryland, for the last 350+ years; previously of the Danelaw.
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    812
    One of my friends had a Wilkinson, in a medieval pattern, from Price Charles' investiture as Prince of Wales. I recall a high polish and a hilt with a plain dark hardwood grip, and gold-plated pommel and simple cross guard.
    Retired civil servant, part time blacksmith, seasonal Viking ship captain.

  13. #63
    Quote Originally Posted by Bryan T View Post
    Gordon,
    Many thanks for the question. Will try and be as specifiic as possible:

    The guard is of the HC Undress P1821 in being of a steel scroll pattern with a sword knot slit near the pommel, yet the thickness of the guard is not as thick as other HC Wilkinson items I have from the 1860s to 1870s. It is also similiar to the HC Undress P1887 (Robson, 1975, p.77) yet the srcolls are 'tighter' and more compact in appearance. In comparison to other Wilkinson cavalry swords I have of the very late Victorian period, it has the same thinner material cross-sectional depth to the guard and is without the fuller circular section of the earlier HC guards, being more consistent with the HC P1896 adopted by all the cavalry regiments (Robson, 1975, p.79).

    If I were to label it, I would guess at 'a 1896 pattern cavalry sword with a Percy straight double edged blade'.

    Hope this helps..

    Bryan

    PS if you wish to see any more photos, like the guard, I can take some more during the Xmas break?
    Hi Bryan, Thanks very much for the comprehensive description which leaves no doubt as to the type of hilt; some of these cavalry hilts can be a bit tricky if you can't see the front profile of the guard, hence my question. On another subject, did you do any futher investigative work on my two crest and motto?

  14. #64
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    UK
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    124
    Gordon,
    Have sent a pm.
    Bryan

  15. #65
    Here is a neat Wilkinson with either a Solid or Convex blade:

    http://dlimuseum.durham.gov.uk/pgObj...eapons&SEARCH=

    Also note the scabbard is steel but made to resemble the earlier leather infantry scabbard. Steel hilt (perhaps once gilded?) and leather hilt liner.

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