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Thread: Forging titanium alloy. makes good sword fittings...

  1. #1
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    Forging titanium alloy. makes good sword fittings...

    One of my projects that i fooled around with while I have been absent, is forging 6- AL-4V, aerospace grade, titanium alloy. Made 2 rings for family members, from a large quantity of stock i have on hand. very strange, but fun..
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    Barnyard bladesmith, burnt in the front, and frozen in the rear. Comic book metallurgist, too dumb to know that I can't do that.
    "I don't believe in the no-win scenario".. Captain Kirk.

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  2. #2
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    The trick is not to heat it too hot, and hammer like a fool, as it looses it's heat 3 times faster than steel. I used charcoal. if I can dot, just about anyone can do it.
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    Last edited by Jerry Bennett; 11-03-2011 at 06:46 PM.
    Barnyard bladesmith, burnt in the front, and frozen in the rear. Comic book metallurgist, too dumb to know that I can't do that.
    "I don't believe in the no-win scenario".. Captain Kirk.

    It's good to be skilled, but better to be talented.
    It's good to be talented, but better to be gifted.
    It's good to be gifted, but best of all to be determined. - Me

    "The precise balance of brains and balls, will ALWAYS trump those who have too much of one, and not enough of the other". - me

  3. #3
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    Sorry to be talking to myself, but to those 1, or 2 who might be interested, I pierced both holes in the rings. I custom ground a pritcher hole tool, from an old chisel. it lasts about 5 hits, before the titanium totally squashes it. I lost the pic.
    Here is a cool, little photo how Ti works when abraded.
    Attached Images Attached Images  
    Barnyard bladesmith, burnt in the front, and frozen in the rear. Comic book metallurgist, too dumb to know that I can't do that.
    "I don't believe in the no-win scenario".. Captain Kirk.

    It's good to be skilled, but better to be talented.
    It's good to be talented, but better to be gifted.
    It's good to be gifted, but best of all to be determined. - Me

    "The precise balance of brains and balls, will ALWAYS trump those who have too much of one, and not enough of the other". - me

  4. #4
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    I'll try this again......
    My post got vaporized, so i will mention some very important safety tips concerning the for the forging of titanium. Like i said, If i can do it, anyone can...
    Titanium burns. You can see the fines, coming off the work. it is the main ingredient in the little kids, 4th of July sparklers of old. Therefore, do not use a propane forge. Just don't. It eliminates the possibilities of a propane explosion due to an un-extinguishable, exothermic burn. very similar to thermite. Use only charcoal. Not even coal. The thick ash forge I use, is ideal. I burned a pound thermite charge in that. Contained it quite nicely. Also, use a "carburizing" fire. meaning little, or no oxygen. I like to use scrap insawool as a tent. Deep fire. keep the work away from the tuyeres.
    The color shown, is as hot as it will get before combustion.

    The subject of titanium comes up fairly regularly. So I thought I would post some garbage that shows how it works. For reference.
    Barnyard bladesmith, burnt in the front, and frozen in the rear. Comic book metallurgist, too dumb to know that I can't do that.
    "I don't believe in the no-win scenario".. Captain Kirk.

    It's good to be skilled, but better to be talented.
    It's good to be talented, but better to be gifted.
    It's good to be gifted, but best of all to be determined. - Me

    "The precise balance of brains and balls, will ALWAYS trump those who have too much of one, and not enough of the other". - me

  5. #5
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    Ti is really neat stuff, I remember some Katana fittings that were posted some time ago that were fantastic

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by David Lewis Smith View Post
    Ti is really neat stuff, I remember some Katana fittings that were posted some time ago that were fantastic
    What is really cool about Ti, is it's 2/3 the weight of steel, but half again as strong/tough. So you have a large envelope to play with for fittings. Even load bearing fittings.
    Barnyard bladesmith, burnt in the front, and frozen in the rear. Comic book metallurgist, too dumb to know that I can't do that.
    "I don't believe in the no-win scenario".. Captain Kirk.

    It's good to be skilled, but better to be talented.
    It's good to be talented, but better to be gifted.
    It's good to be gifted, but best of all to be determined. - Me

    "The precise balance of brains and balls, will ALWAYS trump those who have too much of one, and not enough of the other". - me

  7. #7
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    have you ever welded ti? and is it even possable to say 'hammer weld' ti?

    I am seeing in my mind a very large (long) basket hilt

  8. #8
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    Well. indeed. I was holding back. ... Full throttle...
    Never, EVER, get cocky.
    Attached Images Attached Images  
    Barnyard bladesmith, burnt in the front, and frozen in the rear. Comic book metallurgist, too dumb to know that I can't do that.
    "I don't believe in the no-win scenario".. Captain Kirk.

    It's good to be skilled, but better to be talented.
    It's good to be talented, but better to be gifted.
    It's good to be gifted, but best of all to be determined. - Me

    "The precise balance of brains and balls, will ALWAYS trump those who have too much of one, and not enough of the other". - me

  9. #9
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    2 ways you can weld Ti. Friction, which is for grannys, or, explosive bonding. No weird inter metallics.
    Barnyard bladesmith, burnt in the front, and frozen in the rear. Comic book metallurgist, too dumb to know that I can't do that.
    "I don't believe in the no-win scenario".. Captain Kirk.

    It's good to be skilled, but better to be talented.
    It's good to be talented, but better to be gifted.
    It's good to be gifted, but best of all to be determined. - Me

    "The precise balance of brains and balls, will ALWAYS trump those who have too much of one, and not enough of the other". - me

  10. #10
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    David,
    It is possible to do "hammer welding", but the technique is not a simple one.
    I have a few pictures of some titanium laminate "TI-LAM" I make on my site here:

    http://www.doorcountyforgeworks.com/..._Laminate.html

    I do my work in a propane forge.

    Ric
    Richard Furrer
    Sturgeon Bay, Wisconsin
    http://doorcountyforgeworks.com/

  11. #11
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    Richard, that is beautiful work

  12. #12
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    Nice. I have a question Richard, is it pure Ti, or alloy. Not trying to steals secrets, but wondering how you deal with alpha case. Also I mention charcoal only, mainly for those who haven't done it and want to try it.
    Barnyard bladesmith, burnt in the front, and frozen in the rear. Comic book metallurgist, too dumb to know that I can't do that.
    "I don't believe in the no-win scenario".. Captain Kirk.

    It's good to be skilled, but better to be talented.
    It's good to be talented, but better to be gifted.
    It's good to be gifted, but best of all to be determined. - Me

    "The precise balance of brains and balls, will ALWAYS trump those who have too much of one, and not enough of the other". - me

  13. #13
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    Jerry,
    It is CP and 6/4..they appear to not have any issues with bonding and forging.
    I would think that some of the higher alloy titaniums would not do as well, but I have limited experience with those.

    Ric
    Richard Furrer
    Sturgeon Bay, Wisconsin
    http://doorcountyforgeworks.com/

  14. #14
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    you know, LOL, I have some Ti plates and sheets at the house. I was going to turn them in to plate and lames for armor. They might make an interesting core for a migration style guard and pommel

  15. #15
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    I recently forged some 6alv4 (or something like that) in a gas forge, I was told by others who work it to coat in flux, which I did. Boy is it a *%$&%$ to hand forge, but I was also working .125 very thin stuff.

    I also worked it in a gas forge.
    I dunno. Iron is sort-of the Paris Hilton of metals, and carbon, nickel, chromium silicon, etc. are a bunch of good looking guys she just met at a party. - Al Massey

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jerry Bennett View Post
    Well. indeed. I was holding back. ... Full throttle...
    Never, EVER, get cocky.
    Jerry, those sparks remind me of the first time I ran some titanium through a centerless grinder... my eyes nearly popped out of my head and I was scared out of my wits. The guy working with me laughed at me, pulled the piece out, flipped it around, and dialed in another .01" on the dial. "Titanium soft, you take off lots in one pass."

    A week later I took a day off and found out the next day that I missed the same guy blowing up his grinding wheel taking too much off of a piece of titanium.
    Last edited by Jeff Ellis; 01-06-2012 at 12:42 AM.
    I like swords.

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  17. #17
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    double post.
    I like swords.

    ______________________________
    SCHOLA GLADIATORIA
    ______________________________

    If you want to climb a mountain, begin at the top.

    "Integrity, justice, courage, and action - without these, a person is of no consequence." - Don Nelson

    learn the way to preserve rather than destroy.
    avoid rather than check, check rather than hurt, hurt rather than maim, maim rather than kill.
    for all life is precious, not one can be replaced.

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