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Thread: Help needed with old kukri please....

  1. #1

    Help needed with old kukri please....

    Hello. I am looking for any info about my kukri please. I posted the same question on another forum without any luck. If anyone can help I would be very grateful. Here is the link to the forum and photos of the knife. Many thanks.

    http://www.bladeforums.com/forums/sh...1#post11324971

  2. #2
    Nice native Nepali made Kukri.
    I'd guess a date of between the wars.
    Anything stamped into the top/butt of the wood handle?

  3. #3
    Quote Originally Posted by Gene Wilkinson View Post
    Nice native Nepali made Kukri.
    I'd guess a date of between the wars.
    Anything stamped into the top/butt of the wood handle?
    Thanks for your reply Gene. I've had a close look with a magnifying glass and can't see anything anywhere on the handle or the blade.

  4. #4
    agreed w gene and same conclusion!
    im leaning more towards ww2 then ww1 era on this one though due to the blade style.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    Southern Germany, squeezed between black forest and Swabian Alps
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    1,087
    Hi Mr. A Smith.
    I agree with Gene and V.
    It is not arsenal made and does not fall into the "military patterns" we see. So as Gene pointed out it was most likely made by a village kami.
    After WW2 we see the fuller lines either vanish or not done as deep as with your example. That is an indicator for WW2 or earlier.
    The plate at the end of the handle (that has gone now) with a central keeper being welded in tang (keeper also gone) is a feature
    that points to post WW1. One could argue that at the end WW1 with some of the military pieces featuring metal end plates this practice came up - but I'm not aware of a dated WW1 civilian example with the central keeper design.
    These features narrow the blade down to the time between the wars.
    So anything from 1920s to 1940 is possible.

    The back of the blade looks very round with no "shoulder" - a visible angle in the back where the blade
    changes direction from up to down.
    The shoulder is something that we see more and more with civilian blades after WW1 and increasingly after WW2. Hence the overall blade shape looks pre WW2 to me - so I fully agree with V. and Gene.

    It looks like a good all purpose blade - useful for daily work and even self defense.

    Two questions.
    - It is tough to see in the pictures but is the bolster made from steel as well or is it copper ?
    - the thin leather strap arround the sheath and the side pockets: Does it end in two buttons at the other side of the scabbard or is it just a strap ?

    These are things that could also help.
    thanks a lot for coming here and virtually bringing your kukri with you.

    regards
    Andreas
    Last edited by Andreas Volk; 09-27-2012 at 08:23 AM.
    As lo, the boy looked upon the beauty of the forward curved blade, and beauty stayed his hands
    and from that day forward, he was financially doomed.

    King Kukri, 2005

  6. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by Andreas Volk View Post
    Hi Mr. A Smith.
    I agree with Gene and V.
    It is not arsenal made and does not fall into the "military patterns" we see. So as Gene pointed out it was most likely made by a village kami.
    After WW2 we see the fuller lines either vanish or not done as deep as with your example. That is an indicator for WW2 or earlier.
    The plate at the end of the handle (that has gone now) with a central keeper being welded in tang (keeper also gone) is a feature
    that points to post WW1. One could argue that at the end WW1 with some of the military pieces featuring metal end plates this practice came up - but I'm not aware of a dated WW1 civilian example with the central keeper design.
    These features narrow the blade down to the time between the wars.
    So anything from 1920s to 1940 is possible.

    The back of the blade looks very round with no "shoulder" - a visible angle in the back where the blade
    changes direction from up to down.
    The shoulder is something that we see more and more with civilian blades after WW1 and increasingly after WW2. Hence the overall blade shape looks pre WW2 to me - so I fully agree with V. and Gene.

    It looks like a good all purpose blade - useful for daily work and even self defense.

    Two questions.
    - It is tough to see in the pictures but is the bolster made from steel as well or is it copper ?
    - the thin leather strap arround the sheath and the side pockets: Does it end in two buttons at the other side of the scabbard or is it just a strap ?

    These are things that could also help.
    thanks a lot for coming here and virtually bringing your kukri with you.

    regards
    Andreas

    Andreas, thank you very much for your detailed reply. Your knowledge is impressive to say the least. I now appreciate the piece even more than I did before. To hopefully answer your questions I have included some more pictures for you of the bolster and sheath. I'm no expert, but i am quite sure the bolster is steel. I can't see any copper colour or oxidation type damage that I have seen on old bronze items before. I paid £50 for the knife, scabbard and two smaller knives. Do you think I got a deal or not? Thanks again for your time. Best regards.


    http://www.flickr.com/photos/riven2011/8030294191/

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/riven20...in/photostream


    http://www.flickr.com/photos/riven20...in/photostream

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/riven20...in/photostream


    http://www.flickr.com/photos/riven20...in/photostream

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/riven20...in/photostream

  7. #7
    Here's a couple more close ups with extra lighting.

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/riven2011/8030405999/

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/riven20...in/photostream

    Copper or steel - what do you think?

  8. #8
    Thanks for for reply also V.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Mar 2002
    Location
    Austin, Texas USA
    Posts
    167
    Quote Originally Posted by A smith View Post
    Andreas, thank you very much for your detailed reply. Your knowledge is impressive to say the least.
    And has been greatly missed.

  10. #10
    andreas, great reply and as always ur input is most valuable!
    berkley, well said!
    gene, boom! u nailed it!
    a smith, its a good kukri u got there that will mybe spark ur interest for kukris! 50 quid, i would say is fair, could be less could be more. but personaly i would say a good kukri ur happy with is priceless!

    best regards,
    vk

  11. #11
    do u have others mr smith?

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    Southern Germany, squeezed between black forest and Swabian Alps
    Posts
    1,087
    Quote Originally Posted by BerkleyB View Post
    And has been greatly missed.
    Hi Berkley.
    Thank you for the kind words - I know that I let down many fellow forumites by long absence from posting in this forum and I'd like to apologize to all that come here.
    I also like to Thanks for those who keep up the good and academic spirit.
    Unfortunately I even can't guarantee that I'll be back for long - it really depends on time being available.
    Sometimes I think that to this forum I'm a bit what the Loch Ness Monster is to Cryptozoologists: Every now and then somethings surfaces, does leave a few things to ponder and vanishes again .
    I hope the sighting will last longer this time ...
    Thanks a lot again
    Andreas
    Last edited by Andreas Volk; 09-28-2012 at 10:18 AM. Reason: typing
    As lo, the boy looked upon the beauty of the forward curved blade, and beauty stayed his hands
    and from that day forward, he was financially doomed.

    King Kukri, 2005

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    Southern Germany, squeezed between black forest and Swabian Alps
    Posts
    1,087
    Quote Originally Posted by A smith View Post
    Andreas, thank you very much for your detailed reply. Your knowledge is impressive to say the least. ....
    Mr. A. Smith.
    Thank you very much - all of this knowledge I owe to most of the regulars here and other forae and what might come accross as knowledge is more speculation and guess-work

    Thanks a lot for the very detailed pictures - they help a lot.
    I agree that when looking close, the bolster looks steel - I was being suspicious due to the colour on some of the pics but I agree to the steel.
    (If you like to test - it should be magnetic, which I'm sure it is).
    Steel is a good sign since between the wars brass came more and more into use - so an original steel bolster on a vintage blade is a good sign
    for "old" (and solid).

    The scabbard though is very interesting as it is a "single button" design and only the 2nd of that type I've seen so far.
    In all honesty I don't know if it is a real design or a "quick repair" when one button got lost and a replacement was not available.
    If it is a repair it was most likely done by a Nepalese since the small strap where the second button should be is also dyed red - the same colour as the button.

    May I ask somebody who has observed this design alreday to share his view on the "one button" strap ?

    I'm sorry to come up with another question: On the picture that shows kukri and scabbard, the scabbard looks to be of the right length to be the
    original sheath to that kukri (though it shows a stronger "shoulder" than the back of the blade).
    Using the scabbard to draw conclusions on the Kukri though only makes sense if we look at the original scabbard.
    So my question: How does the kukri reside in the scabbard? Is the fit tight ? Do you have the feeling that there isn't much play when moving the handle
    up and down with the kukri in the scabbard? Do you have the feeling that tehre is still significant air inside the shath at its tip section?.
    When not, the scabbard is most likely original - which is not something to take for granted.

    I also like the curve inside the handle - also a WW2 to pre WW2 indication.

    So from looking at the pictures I'd say we are looking at a blade that is about 75 to 90 years old. Somewhere in that range. Neat find for 50 quid if you ask me - especially if the scabbard is original.

    And I have bad news: If that is your first kukri you are running a high risk of being infected with the kukri virus, which means adding more and more and more down curved blades to your collection .

    All the best
    Andreas
    As lo, the boy looked upon the beauty of the forward curved blade, and beauty stayed his hands
    and from that day forward, he was financially doomed.

    King Kukri, 2005

  14. #14
    Quote Originally Posted by V Kunwor View Post
    do u have others mr smith?


    No V, this is my first - probably of many. My uncle had one he brought back from Borneo during his national service. We used to play with it when we were kids. He lost it in a card game otherwise I would show you guys photos. He told me the Gurkha who gave it to him had used it to chop off an enemy's fingers so they could take them back to their c.o. to see if he was the high priority target they had been after. Don't know if that's true or not but he says so and after seeing photos of him in the jungle carrying an array of weapons - I am inclined to believe him.

  15. #15
    Quote Originally Posted by Andreas Volk View Post
    Mr. A. Smith.
    Thank you very much - all of this knowledge I owe to most of the regulars here and other forae and what might come accross as knowledge is more speculation and guess-work

    Thanks a lot for the very detailed pictures - they help a lot.
    I agree that when looking close, the bolster looks steel - I was being suspicious due to the colour on some of the pics but I agree to the steel.
    (If you like to test - it should be magnetic, which I'm sure it is).
    Steel is a good sign since between the wars brass came more and more into use - so an original steel bolster on a vintage blade is a good sign
    for "old" (and solid).

    The scabbard though is very interesting as it is a "single button" design and only the 2nd of that type I've seen so far.
    In all honesty I don't know if it is a real design or a "quick repair" when one button got lost and a replacement was not available.
    If it is a repair it was most likely done by a Nepalese since the small strap where the second button should be is also dyed red - the same colour as the button.

    May I ask somebody who has observed this design alreday to share his view on the "one button" strap ?

    I'm sorry to come up with another question: On the picture that shows kukri and scabbard, the scabbard looks to be of the right length to be the
    original sheath to that kukri (though it shows a stronger "shoulder" than the back of the blade).
    Using the scabbard to draw conclusions on the Kukri though only makes sense if we look at the original scabbard.
    So my question: How does the kukri reside in the scabbard? Is the fit tight ? Do you have the feeling that there isn't much play when moving the handle
    up and down with the kukri in the scabbard? Do you have the feeling that tehre is still significant air inside the shath at its tip section?.
    When not, the scabbard is most likely original - which is not something to take for granted.

    I also like the curve inside the handle - also a WW2 to pre WW2 indication.

    So from looking at the pictures I'd say we are looking at a blade that is about 75 to 90 years old. Somewhere in that range. Neat find for 50 quid if you ask me - especially if the scabbard is original.

    And I have bad news: If that is your first kukri you are running a high risk of being infected with the kukri virus, which means adding more and more and more down curved blades to your collection .

    All the best
    Andreas

    Hello Andreas and thanks once again for some excellent information. I've took a few more pics for you to look at. To answer your question - yes, the knife was a very tight fit. Infact, I was surprised how tight it was. It is difficult to move the blade up and down in the scabbard because it is so tight. I'm not sure how to tell if there is much space at the tip to be honest. I have also included pics of the little piece from inside the pocket on the scabbard (sorry I don't yet know the correct terminology.)

    Thanks again for sharing your time and knowledge Andreas.

    Best regards, Andy.

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/riven2011/8033820043/


    http://www.flickr.com/photos/riven20...in/photostream


    http://www.flickr.com/photos/riven20...in/photostream


    http://www.flickr.com/photos/riven20...in/photostream

  16. #16
    And yes, my kukri virus has started. My symptoms include googling kukri for sale, reading about the exploits of Gurkhas and watchingnvideos on youtube of kami making the blades. I now know what I want for Xmas from the wife.

  17. #17

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