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Thread: Is this sword design possible?

  1. #1

    Is this sword design possible?

    Okay,

    So I've always really liked moroha zukuri for a blade type with a hitsatura hamon but on a 33 - 34 inch blade. Do you guys/gals think it's remotely feasible to have an assymetric blade this long with a hand-and-a-half hilt?

    Barrett
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  2. #2
    Barrett, try sending these guys an email and see what they say: http://www.dragonsbreathforge.com/

    I've met one of the guys in person at a Renn Faire in CT, and have handled some of their blades. I was impressed; although I know very little about Euro swords. Good luck! Actually, there's also OdinBlades as well. Not sure if Rick Barrett is still making fantasy stuff....
    "It is my feeling that to make a good sword, one must make a weapon first, and art second. But if it is really "right", it is both things at once, and in equal measure." -- Howard Clark

    "I cannot compensate for improper use of a sword. Nothing is bullet proof and idiots prove on a regular basis that nothing is idiot-proof -- they're just too creative." -- Keith Larman

  3. #3
    The only thing I'm concerned with is with the application of clay the blade would not bend in the tempering process due to the expanding/contracting. That would be the one hurdle the smith would have to overcome. As for a hilt I'm thinking for a blend of musashi tsuba with a straight guard and dodecahedron for a pommel.

    Influence of hilt comes from fishtail Warder sword from John Ludemno. A beautiful semi quasical blade made by him and designed by Adrian Ko for (link included for reference).

    http://www.odinblades.com/archives/P...ailWarder.html

  4. #4
    Then you should email John Lundemo and see what he thinks.... Us armchair experts on the forums can say whatever nonsense about what we think a smith could or could not do, but ultimately you gotta hear it from the person who'll actually be making the darn thing.

    I do like your design a lot by the way.
    "It is my feeling that to make a good sword, one must make a weapon first, and art second. But if it is really "right", it is both things at once, and in equal measure." -- Howard Clark

    "I cannot compensate for improper use of a sword. Nothing is bullet proof and idiots prove on a regular basis that nothing is idiot-proof -- they're just too creative." -- Keith Larman

  5. #5
    Thank you sir. The dodecahedron pommel is a little stretched out but that's as small as I could make it still able to discern it's shape. Email sent.

  6. #6
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    The Fish Tail Warder was not an Adrian Ko design, his designs are the Acanthus sword line here in SFI. I cannot make a straight blade with hamon. sorry
    Quote Originally Posted by Barrett Hiebert View Post
    The only thing I'm concerned with is with the application of clay the blade would not bend in the tempering process due to the expanding/contracting. That would be the one hurdle the smith would have to overcome. As for a hilt I'm thinking for a blend of musashi tsuba with a straight guard and dodecahedron for a pommel.

    Influence of hilt comes from fishtail Warder sword from John Ludemno. A beautiful semi quasical blade made by him and designed by Adrian Ko for (link included for reference).

    http://www.odinblades.com/archives/P...ailWarder.html
    "Ah, the old disco room.......just as I left it!" Cassanova Frankenstein

    "It's all about having a good time!" Ricky Martin

    "We are number one....all others are number two or lower!" The Sphinx

    "Let me put my poems in you!" Chazz Micheal Micheals




    www.odinblades.com

  7. #7
    My mistake, John. I was going off by memory. Thank you for your reply. Do you know anyone by chance who can?

  8. #8
    What you have drawn is basically a Japanese style blade with a European style hilt. Those willing and able to make the blade will not likely be familiar with western style hilts, and vice versa. I think your best option would be to have one craftsman who specializes in Japanese style blades make the blade, then send the blade to a craftsman who is familiar with western style hilts to finish it up... For the blade, the first two to come to mind would be Rick Barrett or Walter Sorrells...
    141. Not allowed to use a broadsword to disprove ‘The Pen is Mightier than the sword’.
    Some of my blades

  9. #9
    Quote Originally Posted by G H Ezell View Post
    For the blade, the first two to come to mind would be Rick Barrett or Walter Sorrells...
    I don't think Rick Barrett is making sword-length Japanese style blades anymore (which is really too bad; because they were truly magnificent). But his apprentice Josiah Boomershine, who also does incredible work, may be available. If I were you, I'd send Josiah an email. Considering that Rick Barrett also made some beautiful fantasy and Euro blades, his student Josiah probably learned a lot of that too + has a ready resource to go for advice. You can find his contact info here:

    http://www.barrettcustomknives.com/josiah_s_available

    When it comes down it... your choices will depend a lot on your budget. Josiah's work isn't cheap by any means, and for good reason. Because he was taught by one of the very best and you can see that in the excellence of his featured works.

    If you can afford it, you could go for a tamahagane blade made by another "American mukansa" (I just made that up, but he really is amazing)... Anthony DiCristafano: www.namahagesword.com

    Another smith who doesn't get nearly enough attention on this forum, Francis Boyd: www.francisboyd.com

    Or, if you want a "real" nihonto made for you by a Japanese smith: www.embu-shinken.com

    What would be amazing is if you could get a custom-made nihonto, then ask someone like John Lundemo to do the hilt/scabbard (if he is willing/available)... a kind of intercontinental collaboration piece. Some Japanese smith would really get a kick out of it, I'm sure. If you don't believe me, check THIS out:

    http://blogs.yahoo.co.jp/y8077jp/66966660.html

    http://www.samurai-sword-shop.com/bl...-meets-future/

    Whatever you decide to do, just be sure to come back and share some pictures.
    "It is my feeling that to make a good sword, one must make a weapon first, and art second. But if it is really "right", it is both things at once, and in equal measure." -- Howard Clark

    "I cannot compensate for improper use of a sword. Nothing is bullet proof and idiots prove on a regular basis that nothing is idiot-proof -- they're just too creative." -- Keith Larman

  10. #10
    Join Date
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    When quenching with water with a clay coat horizontally edge first, the straight blade will curve up. So, the trick is to precurve the blade downward then clay coat it and heat treat and when it is quenched it curves up and can come to straight. If the blade is double edge then quenching horizontal is out. So straight double edge swords are quenched vertically tip first and they stay straight. If a straight sword with one edge and stiff spine is heat treated and quenched tip first it can actually tip dip, which is impossible to get out. If you leave enough meat you can grind it straight but that stinks. I have done all these things and just prefer to do japanes style stuff horizontal with clay in water fior the natural curve. I should not have said I cannot do it, should have said the chance for error is too high for me to take the effort. You will find very few blades with a true hamon that are straight. There was a time when I would have taken the job if asked. I've made plenty euro katana styled stuff and I specialize in japanese style and euro blades, chinese etc, so don't say I don't specialize but so and so does. That's just rude!

    http://www.barrettcustomknives.com/josiah_s_available

    When it comes down it... your choices will depend a lot on your budget. Josiah's work isn't cheap by any means, and for good reason. Because he was taught by one of the very best and you can see that in the excellence of his featured works.

    If you can afford it, you could go for a tamahagane blade made by another "American mukansa" (I just made that up, but he really is amazing)... Anthony DiCristafano: www.namahagesword.com

    Another smith who doesn't get nearly enough attention on this forum, Francis Boyd: www.francisboyd.com

    Or, if you want a "real" nihonto made for you by a Japanese smith: www.embu-shinken.com

    What would be amazing is if you could get a custom-made nihonto, then ask someone like John Lundemo to do the hilt/scabbard (if he is willing/available)... a kind of intercontinental collaboration piece. Some Japanese smith would really get a kick out of it, I'm sure. If you don't believe me, check THIS out:

    http://blogs.yahoo.co.jp/y8077jp/66966660.html

    http://www.samurai-sword-shop.com/bl...-meets-future/

    Whatever you decide to do, just be sure to come back and share some pictures. [/QUOTE]
    "Ah, the old disco room.......just as I left it!" Cassanova Frankenstein

    "It's all about having a good time!" Ricky Martin

    "We are number one....all others are number two or lower!" The Sphinx

    "Let me put my poems in you!" Chazz Micheal Micheals




    www.odinblades.com

  11. #11
    Join Date
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    My daughters gonna have a baby any time now so I'm a little jumpy
    "Ah, the old disco room.......just as I left it!" Cassanova Frankenstein

    "It's all about having a good time!" Ricky Martin

    "We are number one....all others are number two or lower!" The Sphinx

    "Let me put my poems in you!" Chazz Micheal Micheals




    www.odinblades.com

  12. #12
    Mr. Lundemo, congratulations on the imminent birth of your grandchild!!!

    Dare we hope to see an Odin (blade) made in honor/celebration of the occasion? I know that it would go a long way toward energizing this place with some much-needed energy and activity, to have someone of your caliber sharing pictures of your work with us again....

    Anyone who has followed your work over the years would know that you are among the most versatile, gifted, and creative sword smiths living and working today. The pictures on your website alone is almost an ENCYCLOPEDIA of the different sword styles around the world. I really don't believe any offense or slight was intended toward you in either GH Ezell's or my posts. We were just trying to help explore the different range of options out there for the thread's OP...
    "It is my feeling that to make a good sword, one must make a weapon first, and art second. But if it is really "right", it is both things at once, and in equal measure." -- Howard Clark

    "I cannot compensate for improper use of a sword. Nothing is bullet proof and idiots prove on a regular basis that nothing is idiot-proof -- they're just too creative." -- Keith Larman

  13. I really don't believe any offense or slight was intended toward you in either GH Ezell's or my posts. We were just trying to help explore the different range of options out there for the thread's OP...
    Absolutely no offense intended! You are one of the few (if not the only) I know of who is able to do justice to both eastern and western sword styles.

    And congratulations on your upcoming grandchild....
    141. Not allowed to use a broadsword to disprove ‘The Pen is Mightier than the sword’.
    Some of my blades

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