Results 1 to 6 of 6

Thread: lone wolf and cub

  1. #1

    lone wolf and cub

    a few weeks ago I'd thought I'd watch some old lone wolf movies I hadn't watched them for years, Ogami Itto's katana caught my eye I recognize that tsuba ,ivé got the same tsuba on one of my katana's a family blade with a gunto saya.yep it's the same tsuba allright. I know Tomisaburô Wakayama used his own swords in his non fighting scenes and this is the same tsuba/sword through out the series ,anyway I know very little of tsuba.can anyone help me with info on this tsuba it would be appreciated. thanks
    Jon
    Attached Images Attached Images        

  2. #2
    That does look like the same tsuba. One thing that's always puzzled me is the destinctive kashira on Ogami's sword - it looks like it's made of silver and very plain. I've never seen another like it.

    Name:  Lone Wolf Movie Sword 01.jpg
Views: 814
Size:  70.7 KB

    Name:  Lone Wolf Movie Sword 2.jpg
Views: 360
Size:  94.8 KB

  3. #3
    I think the tsuba is based on the abalone (awabi) shell. The Japanese have had a special fondness for abalone since ancient times, believing it to have been the elixir of life that Qin Shi Huang, the first emperor of the Qin Dynasty (third century BC), sought for. During the Edo period (1603-1868) dried abalone, along with dried sea cucumber and shark fin, was one of the three marine exports from Japan that were especially prized in China.

    Abalone has also been known in Japan to be good for the eyes. This is evidenced by the saying in Mie Prefecture, which has a thriving abalone fishing industry, that eating abalone during pregnancy will give the child beautiful eyes. The abalone of Mie, moreover, has had an important influence on Japanese celebratory traditions. It is customary to wrap formal gifts with paper called noshi gami and to place monetary gifts in envelopes called noshi bukuro. Both of these have their origins in noshi awabi, stretched and dried strips of abalone that are still made today in Mie Prefecture

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Järvenpää, Finland
    Posts
    3,241
    Quote Originally Posted by John A Stuart View Post
    I think the tsuba is based on the abalone (awabi) shell. The Japanese have had a special fondness for abalone since ancient times, believing it to have been the elixir of life that Qin Shi Huang, the first emperor of the Qin Dynasty (third century BC), sought for. During the Edo period (1603-1868) dried abalone, along with dried sea cucumber and shark fin, was one of the three marine exports from Japan that were especially prized in China.

    Abalone has also been known in Japan to be good for the eyes. This is evidenced by the saying in Mie Prefecture, which has a thriving abalone fishing industry, that eating abalone during pregnancy will give the child beautiful eyes. The abalone of Mie, moreover, has had an important influence on Japanese celebratory traditions. It is customary to wrap formal gifts with paper called noshi gami and to place monetary gifts in envelopes called noshi bukuro. Both of these have their origins in noshi awabi, stretched and dried strips of abalone that are still made today in Mie Prefecture
    You. Are. Awesome.
    Certified nerd; if you need an Excel sheet or an AutoCAD drawing done, just drop me a PM!

  5. #5
    It's unavailable, but this Iaito looks very familiar!

    Name:  021-137-2.jpg
Views: 197
Size:  32.7 KB

    http://www.yamatobudogu.com/Special_..._p/021-137.htm

  6. #6

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •