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Thread: Screaming (so called Ames) Eagle

  1. #51
    Join Date
    Feb 2002
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    Nipmuc USA
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    An archived link view that I can't find on the current publisher's pages

    https://web.archive.org/web/20170118...eferences.html

    Note the dates for all three articles, both the first and last regarding the duping of style during the 1830s

    Cheers

    GC

  2. #52
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
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    Screaming Eagles

    The most noticeable thing to me has always been the earlier look in styling of the British screamers while the Ames pieces mostly have later styling attributes. The plot thickens, when did Wooley stop using this mark?
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    Last edited by Eric Fairbanks; 09-04-2020 at 06:23 AM.
    The unlimited power of the sword is not in the hands of either the federal or state governments, but, where I trust in God it will ever remain, in the hands of the people." --- Tench Coxe

  3. #53
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    Oct 2007
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    Kingston area, Ontario Canada
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    3,544
    I've seen early 1821p LC troopers swords marked Woolley & Sargant. I have a 1790's LC sword marked Woolley.

  4. #54
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    Feb 2002
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    My own real interests in the matter have been more to distinguish the Ames swords from all the rest. The mention of German examples mimicking this pommel makes me even more curious, as there is another development that pokes me in the eye a bit. I need to open the Ames book again for that ferrule anomaly. Perhaps others have noticed this very German trait of the oak leaf and acorn pattern that are identical to the miles of metal we find on these.

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    Anyway

    As mentioned a number of times, general consensus is that surplus blades and bits did get distributed over time (The Bazelon article but one of them). We know, for instance, that even the American big two of Horstmann & Ames produced many swords from a mix and match practice, I would hardly expect other countries to have approached that differently. I have shown my Woolley Deakin & Co. eagle pommel sword a number of times and in most instances have deferred to the reality that the marked blade did not make it a sword made by the firm of Woolley Deakin & Co.

    Perhaps one of the most quizzical screamers I have come across is a well marked and etched example, with the proper pommel, grip and ferrule that bears a knuckle guard we would find on Spies sword examples. A custom? A period retrofit? It is one that kind of bowled me over. It had recently and briefly been owned by our own Tim Graham and surfaced again in a new collector whom has posted of it. Immediately recognized, as I had archived it during both auctions over the past few years. This one really does have me just trying not to scratch my head too much.

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    I continue to harvest images but I have started to be a little more selective. I am glad to read of Eric's acquisitions and this one does seem to read as Woolley & Sargant.

    More and more, I have tried to keep an open mind on my own level of findings and one this past year or so really did have me saying "never say never" One guard in particular is the Ketland type with the first empire looking guards. I swore up and down there were never, ever any Osborn weepers with the guard type. Well.......

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    ............foot in mouth.

    Eric mentioned on facebook that he is working on a screamer that appears to be like a Porter marked example. One that I have posted of in the past, marked to Porter leads to Bezdek and Bazelon books that list a metal (gold&silver) smith and militaria company in Utica NY with listings from 1816 until his death in 1862. That example as well a British looking bird. A mixed panel blade of b&g/bright etchings.


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    So, some morning musings. I have some recent stuff to archive but I am coming to a close as to new variants (never say never though). Someone got that recent Bolton spadroon at a good price. I watched the auction and will archive that one but I did not bid on it. I still wait for that one particular sword.

    Cheers
    GC

    We have lost emoticons on the board here but be assured that I am my same old jovial snarky self ?8^)~
    Last edited by Glen C.; 09-08-2020 at 08:19 AM.

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