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Thread: 16th and 17th century repros

  1. #1
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    16th and 17th century repros

    cruciform hilt large octogonal pommel
    Total-43 1/4
    Blade-35 7/8
    Width- 1 3/4
    Thick- 3/16
    POB-7 1/8 from hilt
    From tang button 14 3/8 from point 28 3/4
    I had no idea these early repros were so well built. Very flexible and seem well balanced for the limited number this old wrangler has had the opportunity to hold. Don't see many on the western slope. Has some age on it so could be 19th century but I don't have a clue. Anyone know who made these? Traces of gold in valleys, veneers not glit. Would love to here
    Comments or opinions as these are right purty. Eric
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    The unlimited power of the sword is not in the hands of either the federal or state governments, but, where I trust in God it will ever remain, in the hands of the people." --- Tench Coxe

  2. #2
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    Looks nice, but a bit point-heavy in my opinion for a bastard sword (POB quite far from the hilt). Which is the total weight?

    The brass (or copper?) inlays add lots of medieval character, indeed. A good-old repro.

    Juan J.
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  3. #3
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    Thanks Juan, very informative for understanding the early swords. I thought the inlays were interesting and crudely done on purpose. Also the gold I cannot get on camera in all the nooks and crannies. The scales I have here in Wyoming are not super accurate but they say it weighs right at 2 pounds. Would this be an Austrian style hilting? Thanks Eric
    The unlimited power of the sword is not in the hands of either the federal or state governments, but, where I trust in God it will ever remain, in the hands of the people." --- Tench Coxe

  4. #4
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    Hmm... 2 pounds, that is, a bit over 900 grs. Lighter than I expected. In that case a POB closer to the point is in order, to improve the cutting ability of the sword while being able to control the point.

    Regarding the style, just remember it is a repro from the Victorian revival, and as such not necessarily a close copy of any original. In fact it reminds me the Spanish style, with that flaring ends of the quillions. Like the sword of Gonzalo Fernández de Córdoba, in the Real Armería in Madrid:

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    Juan J.
    SI, SI
    NO, NON

  5. #5
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    Thanks for your reply. Thats great I can place it in my Spanish wall display. The blade thickness or rather thinness worried me some. Would the measurements on this sword be within ballpark for original swords. Thanks for your help. Eric
    The unlimited power of the sword is not in the hands of either the federal or state governments, but, where I trust in God it will ever remain, in the hands of the people." --- Tench Coxe

  6. #6
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    On the very light side, really, even for a sword that lies somehow between a single- and a one-and-a-half-handed sword. Not impossible, of course, there is no fast rule for that!

    The repros' typical fault is being too heavy, so not bad for this one...
    SI, SI
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  7. #7
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    Hola Juan and Eric,

    Not bad for a repro....Juan, if from Toledo, they went a long way since last time I was there (1995).

    Dan

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    My problem with these, the swept hilts and cup hilts for that matter is I have held very few. It is amazing how many people will lie about a sword they want you to buy. Both of these gentleman were very honest but that is not always the case when starting to shop out side your knowledge. There are no reproduction Starrs made in the 1900s. So I am playing a new game. I will make a trip to Europe this year to vist some museums. There are no marks on blade I can find Dan. Juan did say the guard end flaring does follow a Spanish style. I was just trying to learn more about Colonial Spanish items and got to close to these eary styles and must have caught the bug or something. I will read on. Eric
    The unlimited power of the sword is not in the hands of either the federal or state governments, but, where I trust in God it will ever remain, in the hands of the people." --- Tench Coxe

  9. #9
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    The only thing that bothers me is that the copper inlay looks like it was done by inserting modern electrical wire in drill-pressed holes and then planishing it down; but it is not very neatly done. The rest of the work on the sword appears much more competent. Perhaps the copper work is a later embellishment, or somebody "personalized" the sword with these further decorations, but that feature seems to indicate "20th century" to me. I don't remember seeing this style inlay in earlier pieces.
    Retired civil servant, part time blacksmith, seasonal Viking ship captain.

  10. #10
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    The copper inlay or mess lay, may be drilled then melted, smashed or both . Very rough indeed. The gold in nooks and crannies looks old and well done. If we ever get some light from the sun I will post close ups. I just have not seen enough of originals, Victorian or modern repros to have a base. Perhaps as you say modern work on old repro. Thanks for helping. Eric
    The unlimited power of the sword is not in the hands of either the federal or state governments, but, where I trust in God it will ever remain, in the hands of the people." --- Tench Coxe

  11. #11
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    Chicago Art Institute

    Not a lot but very interesting.
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    The unlimited power of the sword is not in the hands of either the federal or state governments, but, where I trust in God it will ever remain, in the hands of the people." --- Tench Coxe

  12. #12
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    A few more.
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    The unlimited power of the sword is not in the hands of either the federal or state governments, but, where I trust in God it will ever remain, in the hands of the people." --- Tench Coxe

  13. #13
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    Sword Repellant

    A few more photos and a sword repellant suit interesting in that it still has all linen intact.
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    The unlimited power of the sword is not in the hands of either the federal or state governments, but, where I trust in God it will ever remain, in the hands of the people." --- Tench Coxe

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