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Thread: The other Kukri bought at the weekend.

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
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    West Yorkshire, England.
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    The other Kukri bought at the weekend.

    This is the other Kukri bought at Birmingham, I would guess later in date but again not service issue. Not as fine in lines or finish as the previous one, and the spine rougher and without the distal taper that one had. It has a a belt loop, two pockets for by-knives of which one survives but no khissa. All iron mounts................ Any ideas as to this one being Indian or Nepali in manufacture, or when it was made?
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  2. #2
    Join Date
    Sep 2013
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    Northants UK
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    Not a bad looking kukri. I'm not too good with an ID on this one but hopefully someone will offer you an opinion soon.

    Captain.
    PARTING THE CLOUDS SEEKING THE WAY
    Everyone is entitled to their own opinions not their own facts.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
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    Buckinghamshire, England
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    Hello David,

    Another good find. I would place your kukri from mid WW2 onwards. The use of steel rather than brass fittings is a good general indication of earlier production.

    Probably made for private purchase, one of many styles which could have been bought by troops in India, possibly made in the area around Darjeeling.

    Very unlikely to be an issued piece.

    Kind regards,

    Chris

  4. #4
    Hi David,

    Id agree with Chris, ww2 up to early fifties for the kukri.


    Its Indian made to me, the style which some used to call "military sirupate" looks classic Dehradun style to me, as does the scabbard.

    Some kukri in this style were carried by Gurkhas, but given the number of Gurkhas, employed against the other British army troops stationed in India many of whom were issued & even more bought a kukri, ownership by a Chindit or some other British unit is much more likely. Most of those were private purchase. {not all though.}

    But of course this is all just our veiwpoints, once the provenance has been lost, we are left with or informed opinions.

    It is true to say nearly evry soldier Ive met, who served in India or Burma, bought a Gurkha knife to bring back, & took a Japanese sword of the piles at surrender as well.

    I met a lot many years ago, as my father served there as a Chindit. {He didn't bring back a kukri, just his short machete & katana.}

    Is there any sign of frog wear on the scabbard? I cant see any?

    Jonathan
    "The greatest obstacle to discovery is not ignorance - it is the illusion of knowledge."

    Daniel J. Boorstin

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
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    Your comment had me going and having a closer look at the scabbard, and I can see no signs of wear from a military style frog. The front of the scabbard has been cut by the passage of the blade, which I suspect it why it has been deliberately blunted at the wide part of the blade. Not by too much thankfully, it looks to have been a light pass with a file to take the razor edge off.............. I wonder if someone cut themselves or feared others doing so.

  6. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by David R View Post
    Your comment had me going and having a closer look at the scabbard, and I can see no signs of wear from a military style frog. The front of the scabbard has been cut by the passage of the blade, which I suspect it why it has been deliberately blunted at the wide part of the blade. Not by too much thankfully, it looks to have been a light pass with a file to take the razor edge off.............. I wonder if someone cut themselves or feared others doing so.

    Thanks David, ok so probably wasn't Gurkha, Garhwal, Royal Engineers or Chindit issue then.

    If not worn on a frog, most likely a private purchase & stashed in bag, rucksack, suitcase whatever..for bringing back to blighty.{Suitcase may sound strange but my dad bought one back from Rangoon, the leather was about 6mm thick! weighed a ton...} but a Brit soldier stationed out there who wanted one of those " infamous Gurkha head chopping knives" That they'd all heard about and seen.

    Luckily its a good one! Any good ww2 kukri should sharpen with a file, that was certainly the spec. for military issue ones..

    About 13 years ago I bought 5 mostly 19th century kukri of a militaria & weapons collector, as he viewed them as so dangerous as with one he had sliced 3 fingers to the bone drawing it.

    His hand was still heavily bandaged as we did the deal.

    Curved blades cut deep...

    Spiral
    "The greatest obstacle to discovery is not ignorance - it is the illusion of knowledge."

    Daniel J. Boorstin

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    West Yorkshire, England.
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    After a serious browse of this forum, I had another look at this Kukri and found that the "belt loop" was nothing of the sort! It is in fact a flap covering the tinder pocket, but sewn down just like the ends of the pockets for the bi-knives. There is nonetheless a pocket there, just inaccessible due to the flap being sewn down and under the tie thong.
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    Last edited by David R; 06-14-2016 at 03:21 PM. Reason: added photo

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Sep 2013
    Location
    Northants UK
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    231
    Hi.
    Nice spot! It's always good to find new things about our charge's.
    Now depending on how well stitched it is, how brave you feel and how supple the leather is after 70 odd years hmmmmm curiosity could get the better of you. There have been many interesting finds in them there tinder pouches�� also loads more have nothing.
    But take great care.

    David
    ��
    PARTING THE CLOUDS SEEKING THE WAY
    Everyone is entitled to their own opinions not their own facts.

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