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Thread: Spike Tomahawk

  1. #1

    Spike Tomahawk

    Hello guys
    Can anyone help me with this tomahawk.
    I can't find similar one .

    Thank you


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  2. #2
    Hi guys
    Please, is this piece original or not ?

    Thank you

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 2014
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    Ontario, Canada
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    105
    "Swords and Blades of the American Revolution" by Neuman show half a dozen examples of very similar axes but not one shows engraving, a date or a manufacturer's mark.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2002
    Location
    Southern Maryland, for the last 350+ years; previously of the Danelaw.
    Posts
    812
    The striations on the handle and the nail heads appear to be modern; so a replacement handle would not be uncommon given the age and abuse that an original might be put to over a period of 256 years. Far more odd is the extensive, if crude, decoration and notation on the head itself. Most examples I've seen of blacksmith-made tools and weapons from this period are marked by a simple touchmark and/or date (if marked at all). On the other claw, something made by a gunsmith would be much better formed, and the more extensive decoration would not be executed in so crude a manner. Or, it may have been done 30 years ago for or by a French and Indian War reenactor.

    Still, you never know when some friend or smith or apprentice gets overenthusiastic and reaches a bit beyond their skill; BUT I would be very cautious in declaring its provenance. Any supporting information? Where, when, reputable dealer, passed down through family, &c?
    Retired civil servant, part time blacksmith, seasonal Viking ship captain.

  5. #5
    Thank you guys.
    Bruce,i got it from local antique store,so no provenance,sorry

    Regards

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Location
    North West US
    Posts
    1,341
    Ivan, I have one I think is somewhat similar and marked to William Rose but will have to dig it out when I get home. I only have a couple or so early trade axes but both are the type where spike is inserted in wood and secured not like yours with hole for wood handle. The extra long spike is needed for that type but odd for your type. Yours does have the simplistic look of trade items. Your markings are hard to read can you transcribe them? T in diamond, DH__EA__ 1760 with half arrow? The trade hatchets I have have handled which are very few were extremely light built. Eric
    The unlimited power of the sword is not in the hands of either the federal or state governments, but, where I trust in God it will ever remain, in the hands of the people." --- Tench Coxe

  7. #7
    Thank you Eric
    Here are some more pictures.
    Sorry ,I can't transcribe ,but could be PHXEA ? or DHEEA ?
    I can't tell

    Regards

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Location
    North West US
    Posts
    1,341
    Ivan, I think the PHXEA looks right. Interesting looking hatchet. Perhaps an early trade axe but markings need more info. Give it some time perhaps the right person will see it. Eric
    The unlimited power of the sword is not in the hands of either the federal or state governments, but, where I trust in God it will ever remain, in the hands of the people." --- Tench Coxe

  9. #9
    thank you Eric
    Forgot to add more pictures

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  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jul 2014
    Location
    Annandale, VA
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    945
    Quote Originally Posted by Eric Fairbanks View Post
    Ivan, I think the PHXEA looks right. Interesting looking hatchet. Perhaps an early trade axe but markings need more info. Give it some time perhaps the right person will see it. Eric
    How about "JR" (conjoined in diamond)/PHILA/(Arrow pointing at) 1760"?

  11. #11
    oh boy, Richard I think you are correct, i can see it now,it looks like a Phila.
    Thank you very much

    Regards

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Location
    North West US
    Posts
    1,341
    According to Fur Trade Axes and Tomahawks web site it is called a "belly ripper", an 18th century style tomahawk made for Iroquois tribe although the actual use of elongated pike is unknown. Eric
    The unlimited power of the sword is not in the hands of either the federal or state governments, but, where I trust in God it will ever remain, in the hands of the people." --- Tench Coxe

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