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Thread: Edward VII P1897 sword - real or not?

  1. #26
    What I meant is that the first letter has a single horizontal bar between the I and C which together form a H (I-C), while the second letter has a double middle bar between the I and C (I=C). I don't mean real I and C, but the equivalent handwritten signs. That is why many people in this thread assumed HK or even HSC to be more plausible than HH, but still, I have failed to find any other match until now.

  2. #27
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    If the first H was actually two letters I would say TC however H is most likely. If you look at the second H the verticals match very closely to the first H, very doubtful there is a C or I etc.
    Last edited by Will Mathieson; 04-22-2020 at 10:21 AM.

  3. #28
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    I think the 2nd letter is S=C.

    There is a swordforum thread which discusses another sword with joined letters etched on the blade. I've been trying to find it for comparison but I can't remember what the name or letters were. Something like St Claire or St. Charles or the like.

    Does anyone recall the thread or have an etched example of S=C for comparison?

  4. #29
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    It would be unusual to have only two letters linked (SC) and not the others. That and what looks possibly like an S smaller in height than the other initials.
    Good point to compare to other initials though different etchers use their own particular font style.

  5. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by Will Mathieson View Post
    It would be unusual to have only two letters linked (SC) and not the others. That and what looks possibly like an S smaller in height than the other initials.
    I'm thinking the 2 letters might be linked to represent St. Clair. I'm feel like I've seen an example of this before.

  6. #31
    Quote Originally Posted by Will Mathieson View Post
    If the first H was actually two letters I would say TC however H is most likely. If you look at the second H the verticals match very closely to the first H, very doubtful there is a C or I etc.
    I agree with Will, I think HHPM is correct.

  7. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by Victor S View Post
    Taking advantage in the long wait at home, I have resumed the search and found in 1906 a Herbert Henry Powys Morton, second lieutenant Durham Light Infantry (at page 333). What do you think, would this be possible?

    He appears as resignation in 1907: Morton, H. H. P., Durham L. I., 3 March 06. - resignation.

    It seems he became later a medic and it was granted the rank of lieutenant in 1914: https://www.thegazette.co.uk/London/.../6498/data.pdf

    I have also found another mention about him: 813 M ii. Herbert Henry Powys MORTON [111370] was born on 26 Jun 1884 in Salisbury Wiltshire England and died on 31 Dec 1956 in Reigate Surrey England at age 72.

    The only weak issue to my theory is that if the initials are HH then why they are drawn in different ways?

    There's also a M.H.K. Patey in 1907, but the letters are not in the right order.
    FWIW, seeing the photo as I was scrolling down, I saw HHPM also....not another letter combo. You may have found your man!
    Being that he didn't have a long career, it makes sense for the sword to look so good.

  8. #33
    I've noticed this article today on facebook:

    https://www.thierrytheswordguy.com/p...ober-29th-1914

    The styling of that H made all my doubts go away. I found him for sure - Herbert Henry Powys Morton

  9. #34
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    Congratulations!

    So that means 103631 matches a commission date of June 1904. Should help for future Pillin research.

  10. #35
    Starting from another thread, where somebody pointed to the UK national archives website with his search, I did a search for my man - Herbert Henry Powys Morton, and I got this medal card. Unfortunately I don't know enough about British Army, so maybe somebody could help me with a few explanations about what is written over there?

    Name:  HHPM.jpg
Views: 33
Size:  100.1 KB

    Thanks,
    Victor

  11. #36
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    Here are some interesting things about him: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/...y_powys-morton
    His name is listed as the 12th from the top.
    Attached Images Attached Images  

  12. #37
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    Listed as a medical student 1911
    Attached Images Attached Images  
    Last edited by Will Mathieson; 12-29-2020 at 08:15 AM.

  13. #38
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    Victor, it shows that he was both a Lieut. and later Capt. In the Royal Army Medical Corps, being awarded the 1914 Star, the British War Medal and the Victory Medal, with dates and reference numbers for each. The Disembarkation Returns refers to the date 19th August 1914, when he first went off to war (France/Belgium). So he was in the first wave and survived, be nice to think he may have known Capt. Noel Chavasse RAMC VC and Bar!

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