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Thread: French or British Naval Sword ?

  1. #1

    French or British Naval Sword ?

    Hello

    What are your thoughts on this sword/
    No markings anywhere.
    Blade is almost 31 inches.
    I have looked everywhere.
    Thank you very much
    Tony
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  2. #2
    That's doubtful. It's a fairly ordinary stirrup-hilted spadroon with a bone grip. As such, it is unlikely it would be appropriate for a naval officer although it could have been carried by a merchant officer (who did wear swords on occasion). I'd guess it is more likely an inexpensive non-com sword c. 1810 made for export.

  3. #3
    Join Date
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    Not French as this type was never used. Is the backstrap a different material than the guard? If so, it could be a composite.

  4. #4
    Join Date
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    Well spotted Max. A photo of the pommel where the tang is peened may tell us something. Back strap appears to be iron and the guard brass.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb 2002
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    Nipmuc USA
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    Stirrup
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    P
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    D
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    That may seem a bit pedantic.

    I am curious about the blade, as some have fullers that don't reach all the way to the point. My feeling is that those with shorter fullers may be of German manufacture. My own example has such a blade, with several inches of flattened diamond cross section.
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    Here with a Berger sabre that has Americana in the blue&gilt
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    I wouldn't rule out US militia use but a lot of the US naval trends between the 1812 war, then the '20s and well into the 1830s were random eaglehead, indian princess and Athena pommel swords with a counterguard

    Cheers
    GC

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jul 2014
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    Quote Originally Posted by Will Mathieson View Post
    Well spotted Max. A photo of the pommel where the tang is peened may tell us something. Back strap appears to be iron and the guard brass.
    Hard to tell from the photo, but it look like it might be good ol' GAR gold paint, especially on the second shot which shows the bottom of the guard.

  7. #7

    More pics

    Hello
    Thank you all for the information and help.
    Someone mentioned that it could be a 1808 version of the Nathan Starr made by Rose.
    I guess they copied the starr sword to some degree with little or no markings.
    I loaded a few pictures one is a Nathan starr that looks very similar and the other is my sword showing the peen
    Thanks again
    Tony
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  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jul 2014
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    That is a very nice Starr M1810 saber - you don't see to many of those around, especially in decent condition. What are the markings on the reverse side of the blade? "US" or perhaps "V"?

    I doubt there is any relationship between your sword and either Starr or Rose. The reverse-P hilt, copied from the M1797 light cavalry saber, was almost universally used both by US and British and German makers of US cavalry swords from 1808 into the 1820s and beyond. The blade on your sword appears to from the later end of the period.

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