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Thread: Two Kammerstuecken. IOD 1889.

  1. #1
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    Lightbulb Two Kammerstuecken. IOD 1889.

    Fellows, I recently acquired these two Prussian Infantry Officers' Swords, AKA; Infantrie Offizier Degen Mod 1889. One is the ubiquitous brass hilt, gold washed, official issue model dated 1896, the other is a wartime model, made in 1916. It is interesting to compare the changes in 20 years that separate these two weapons. Simplified cast iron hilt, blued like a Luger, and the walnut grips with subdued wire wrap. This not the last version, I have owned a later one, dated 1918, that was painted, with black iron wire and a subdued royal cypher on the grip...So they got tactical during the conflict!

    The blades and scabbards are virtually the same and will fit each other. I think these Kammerstuecken or Chamber Pieces are made to the same length. These are not privately purchased swords, rather they are kept in the Bekleidungskammer or Clothing issue room for issue to senior NCO's who were allowed to wear this weapon. There are very minor differences with privately purchased swords versus the State issued examples, mainly the wire, officers usually had three silver wires with the center wire being a larger gauge than the two on each side. This model was specified to have to counter twisted wire of the same size. That is the only real difference. The NCO's were allowed to wear and Officer Portepee, hence their colloquial title of "Portepee Unteroffizieren"

    The other German States had variations on this theme, but I am only covering Prussia here..

    Note the official cat inspector watching the operation!!

    Dale
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  2. #2
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    Also, note that the earlier models were purchased and inspected thru the Erfurt Arsenal. The wartime models were not marked with the Erfurt stamp.

    The brass early model was obtained from a National Guard Armory that was consolidated with another, so they disposed of the war trophies that were displayed in that facility. This one had been on the wall, since 1919, along with other WW 1 items. I got it very cheap, a discount for being a Veteran I suppose...

    Dale

  3. #3
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    Two wonderful examples Dale. Thanks for showing.
    "You can't please everyone, so you have to please yourself." Ricky Nelson

  4. #4
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    I have to say I prefer the steel one- that is a lovely bit of walnut on there.
    hc3

  5. #5
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    Fellows: In 1915, the Germans were running out of whatever fish skin they were using, so the War Office allowed the use of walnut for the grip piece. They also had a shortage of fine leather for the other model grips, so they changed from leather/cord/wood to a bakelite plastic, and allowed wood to be used as well. One sees the Artillery Saber new model with wood grips, as well as the Kavallrie Degen of 1889, but they are not as common as the Artillery model....I like the wood grips too. They are actually quite rare these days compared to the older model...

    Dale

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