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Thread: Best Sword Acquisition of 2018

  1. #1
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    Best Sword Acquisition of 2018

    OK Gents,

    It is time once again for the Best acquisition of 2018 thread. Post your best sword find of this year. It does not have to be the most expensive or rarest item but it does have to be your favorite find for 2018. If you are waiting for Santa to bring you something sharp at the end of the year you can always post again with whatever he brought down the chimney. Sometimes it is rather like picking out your favorite child isn't it?

    My favorite this year is the Weimar Republic period Hesse Officer sword that I picked up at SOS. I had a Hessian Officer Portepee just waiting at home in a drawer for this sword.

    George
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    "You can't please everyone, so you have to please yourself." Ricky Nelson

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  3. #3
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    This year would have to be an 1834p 2nd Lifeguards officers word with patent hilt. Made before the hilt was patented.
    John Glencairn Carter Hamilton was born in Marseilles, France, the only son of Archibald James Hamilton, 12th of Orbiston (1793–1834), and was educated at Eton College. He served in the 2nd Life Guards, rising to the rank of commissioned cornet in 1847, lieutenant in 1849 and captain in 1854. In 1856 he was appointed major in the Queen’s Own Royal Glasgow and Lower Ward of Lanarkshire Yeomanry Cavalry. Although retiring from the regular Army in 1860, he continued to serve in the Yeomanry until 1885.

    He began his political career in 1857 as Liberal Member of Parliament (MP) for Falkirk Burghs, serving for two years. He later sat for Lanarkshire South in 1868–74 and 1880–86. He also served as a Justice of the Peace, and as Deputy Lieutenant and Vice-Lord Lieutenant for Lanarkshire.

    In 1886, Hamilton was raised to the peerage as Baron Hamilton of Dalzell. He served in William Ewart Gladstone's government as a Lord-in-waiting from 1892 to 1894.

    The Hamiltons made large amounts of money in the nineteenth century, as the lands they held in Lanarkshire were sold for coal exploitation. In the late 1850s and 1860s Hamilton was able to greatly extend his home of Dalzell House, a former tower house outside Motherwell, laying out landscaped grounds at the same time. In 1864 he married Lady Emily Leslie-Melville (died 1882), daughter of David Leslie-Melville, 8th Earl of Leven.
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  4. #4
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    Did pick up a nice Swedish cutlass m/1849 couple of weeks ago
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    But this was better
    https://auctionet.com/sv/926583-sabel-engelsk-1800-tal

  5. #5
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    Thanks all for sharing these beautiful swords.

    This one is my standout acquisition this year, to be honest I would struggle to top it in most years.

    Chasseur à cheval sabre of the Imperial Guard. Dated May 1813. Carries by Napoleon's elite light cavalry, also by Lancers of the Guard.

    Classic hussar design, of the highest quality with heavy brass hilt. Brass scabbard with panel cutouts with leather inserts.

    Jerry


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  6. #6

    Sabre de Dragon An XI

    For me it’s this Sabre de Dragon An XI.

    The blade is marked Mfture Nale du Klingenthal Coulaux Frères Entreprs dating it during the Consulate at the latest in 1804.

    The poinçons on both the blade and the hilt are those of Jean Jacques Mouton, contrôleur de 1ère classe, de juillet 1798 à février 1809 using this poinçon until 1805 and Simon Ferdinand Beaumaretz, inspecteur de la manufacture de Klingenthal, septembre 1803 à juin 1807.

    Only the "6 or bonnet" marking remains unidentified.
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    Last edited by DirkS; 12-03-2018 at 12:52 PM.

  7. #7
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    I had a wonderful year of collecting, finding a stunning Grenadier Foot Guards of Canada Officer's sword by Pillin, an 1892 British Infantry Officers by Wilkinson with the transitional blade and my favorite, a Patent-hilt 1845 Infantry Officers sword to Major Coney. All these purchases made better by the freely given help of collectors on this Forum. I'm really looking forward and hoping that I have as great a year as 2018!

    Greg
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  8. #8
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    Can't decide which one is better:
    Austrian (Bohemian) cavalry pallasch from c. 1730-1740
    or Austrian cavalry pallasch p/1769
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  9. #9
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    Well, I assume that it does not play in the premier league as the others, but here you have my latest one: a decent Artillery Officer's sabre from the 1840's, made in Toledo as it is de rigueur, simple and brave, to defend the ordnance from enemy's hands...

    Best,
    Juan J.
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    SI, SI
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  10. #10
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    Ivan
    Very much like your first pallasch - the scabbard is particularly spectacular, as are the beautiful blade inscriptions.

    Juan - that is a handsome sabre by anyone's reckoning.
    Jerry

  11. #11
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    Thanks Jerry.

    BTW, your sabre of the Imperial Guard is truly impressive: no frills, a real combat sword, but with all the elegance and balance of late 18th hussards' sabres. In some sense, one of the last survivors of an era which was almost gone. Excellent piece, congrats.
    SI, SI
    NO, NON

  12. #12
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    Many thanks Juan. You have captured my thoughts perfectly.

    Kind regards.

  13. #13
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    Beautiful swords! It looks like many of us are having a banner collecting year. Keep them coming.
    "You can't please everyone, so you have to please yourself." Ricky Nelson

  14. #14
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    I've had quite a few gems this year, some of which I have not properly photographed and shared yet. But this is probably near the top of my list - Wilkinson patent solid hilt with extra wide flat solid blade, for Major Brodhurst of the 4th Gurkha Rifles:





    Article: http://www.fioredeiliberi.org/antiqu...les/brodhurst/

    Matt

  15. #15
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    Matt that is a special sword and considering it's a rifle officers sword. Rarely ever see a rifle officers sword with special order options. If you're going to have just one rifle officers sword, one as this will set it apart from the vast amount of the common rifle officer swords.

  16. #16
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    Not sure which of the following two USMC swords is really my favorite acquisition. The first is a pre-1859 Horstmann eagle head-pommel sergeant's sword. I like it not only because of its attractive design and history, but also the fact it is in such great condition. I don't believe I have seen another in such good condition. I probably paid too much for it, but I really wanted it.


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    The second is a M1859 NCO sword as modified shortly after WWI to reduce the width of the blade and change the blade's etch design. What makes this one so unusual is it is in a scabbard with two carrying rings instead of the usual frog stud. From 1875 until WWII, the regulations provided that Staff/first class NCOs (e.g. sergeants major and quartermaster sergeants) should wear their swords with slings, while all other NCOs should wear theirs with a frog. Pre-WWI sergeants' swords with wide blades are often found with scabbards with carrying rings. The post-WWI narrow-bladed swords are almost never found with such a scabbard. This is only the second I have ever seen.


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  17. #17
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    Richard your Horstmann sword is a beauty. I believe Man at Arms magazine had a good article some time ago on these and similar. With good condition and rarer swords you can never pay "too much." Give it a year or more and it will be worth what you paid or more. I find if you hesitate on price then you may never get a chance for another either condition wise, for it being rare and provenance. Blue and gilt sword blades never get old "to appreciate"

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jerry Cottrell View Post
    Ivan
    Very much like your first pallasch - the scabbard is particularly spectacular, as are the beautiful blade inscriptions.

    Jerry
    Thanks Jerry!

    According to the seller, this pallasch once was in the personal collection of Michel Petard, a well-known French collector and weapon historian.

  19. #19
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    Hi Ivan
    Yes indeed, this is the very gentleman
    Jerry

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  20. #20
    I have added many great swords to my collection in 2018 however I must say that this one is my favorite. It has a great pedigree and is pictured in two reference books, Small Arms of the Sea Services by Colonel Robert H. Rankin as well as U.S. Naval Officers their Swords and Dirks by Peter Tuite. It is a high grade U.S. Navy Model 1852 Officer’s Sword inscribed "Presented to / William Charlton, USN / as a token of respect, by the employees of / L. Martin & Co. Philadelphia, Oct. 24th 1863" and the blade etched "W. Charlton" in a panel.
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  21. #21
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    Very nice! L. Martin & Co. was a chemical manufacturer, so perhaps Charlton was an senior employee and the works staff pooled resources to buy the sword. He apparently was associated with the firm at least until the 1870s.

    "L. MARTIN & CO., though not so old in the business as most of the others mentioned, have attained a high reputation for the manufacture of chemicals of a pure quality. Their products embrace the various preparations of Morphia, Strychnia, Nitrate of Silver, Acetic and other Acids, and the usual assortment of Fine Chemicals for analytical purposes. This firm have fixed a high standard for the purity of their chemicals, and allow no article to leave their laboratory of an inferior quality. Besides chemicals, Messrs. L. Martin & Co. are largely engaged in the manufacture of Lamp Black, of which their Black and Refined are especial favorites among manufacturers." -- Philadelphia and its manufactures: a hand-book of the great manufactories and representative mercantile houses of Philadelphia, in 1867. by Freedley, Edwin T. (Edwin Troxell), 1827-1904.

  22. #22
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    I love the Charlton US Naval presentation sword. What I particularly like is the use of sharkskin on the scabbard body. A great material for a Navy sword. I have seen this before when the grip is made of silver or leather or some other material in place of sharkskin. The maker/dealers just loved to use this material in whatever way they could.

    A lovely sword and I see why all of these swords are picks of the litter for best sword of 2018.
    "You can't please everyone, so you have to please yourself." Ricky Nelson

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