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Thread: Early American sword issue

  1. #1
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    Early American sword issue

    Name:  IMG_20181210_213017823.jpg
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Size:  100.1 KBHey guys I have what I believe to be a early American 1803 sword
    im posting some photos because I could really use help with a proper I.D. also the guilding looks as if it has literally RAN down the blade .
    What in the world has caused this ?Has anyone else seen this happen? And ive never seen such a heavy patina on a sword its as thick as black plastic .
    Is there any saving this sword?
    best regards
    Bufford
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    Last edited by B.Evans; 12-10-2018 at 10:58 PM.

  2. #2
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    I believe your sword is rather later than 1803. It would appear to be a post-1821 militia officer's sword, probably from the 1830s. (In 1821 the regs were changed to specify wear of swords with a straight spadroon-type blade.) From the design on the counterguard, I would guess it was an artillery officer's sword. The design is rather unusual, but not unique. The counterguard design is not one I've seen too often, and the pommel is also somewhat uncommon - most swords of this period had eagle head pommels or indian maidens or knights' heads. The wood grips are also somewhat uncommon - most used bone. I have no good idea about the gold on the blade. I doubt it is gilt from the hilt which has run - that isn't the way plating was done. It looks like it may be just gold paint, but why someone would do that is beyond me.

  3. #3
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    you are absolutely correct sir .And this spadroon has kept me awake at night . I believe it to be possibly a Widmann , of Philadephia an Early one at that .
    He was known to use walnut in the handle and the W in the guard . Also he was known to use German blades with the markings of K&H as he was a first generation immigrant sword smith from Prussia . As I peel back the layers around the ricasso in finding clues .. Is there a reputable smith that restores old swords ?
    best regards

  4. #4
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    Photos of the layers peeling back
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  5. #5
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    You are right - almost certainly a Widmann product. I had missed the "W"s on the counterguard when I initially looked at the photos. The marking on the ricasso is "K&S", presumably for the Solingen firm of Kirschbaum and Schimmelbusch. I have always associated K&S-marked swords with a rather earlier era, and thought the company stopped doing business under that name shortly after the fall of Napoleon. It could conceivably be the mark of Kirschbaum and Schnitzler, although they usually used the mark "S&K" for Schnitzler and Kirschbaum. They did business under the S&K name up until about 1864 and quite a few Widmann swords are found with S&K blades.

  6. #6
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    This is probably the first sword that I have honestly felt that it was at THAT point where it TRULY needs to be professionally restored .

  7. #7
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    nevermind
    Last edited by Glen C.; 12-11-2018 at 04:06 PM.

  8. #8
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    ?
    killing me here
    lol

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