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Thread: Prussian Mod 1891 dated 1916.

  1. #1
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    Prussian Mod 1891 dated 1916.

    Fount this recently, and it is an average Prussian M 91 Artillery Saber, but it has a wooden grip, and the hilt was blackened at one time. It appears to be a very light black lacquer or paint, which is mostly gone or replaced by corrosion. This one is made by SIMPSON & CO.

    As is kosher for this date, no unit marks. The scabbard is rust blued, and apparently original to this piece.

    In Germany, the collectors are fond of the wood grip wartime sabers, not so much here in the US. The final result of this evolution is the made blued blade and hilt, with wooden grip, dating from the Weimar Era. I have owned just one of these...

    This example has no slot in the guard for a sword knot (Troeddel) This was a simplification to increase production of weapons in wartime.

    This item was the usual issue on the Eastern Front to Artillery and Support Units.
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    Last edited by Dale Martin; 01-27-2019 at 08:20 AM. Reason: add pix...

  2. #2
    Hi Dale

    I've got a '96 one with leather covered wooden grip.

    Were they just for show/parade? I can't think that I've seen one which has been field sharpened?
    They a lot more durable and servicable than many parade sabres of the time but they never seem to look 'used'?

  3. #3
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    The Prussians sharpened their swords in wartime, and this model is indeed a combat weapon with sharpened blade. These grips were, in order, wood wrapped with leather and cord, bakelite and finally walnut with grooves...

    The so called parade weapons are the wimpy thin bladed models that cover up the sales sites, the real ones are not as numerous today..The extra purchase version would be nickel plated, blade and hilt, shiny painted or shiny nickel plated scabbard, depending on date of sale, and a grip that would be dipped wood or sharkskin and almost always with wire..

    The enlisted guys who bought the extra weapons almost always got the officers' versions, almost never the the plain fighting model..

    Dale

  4. #4
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    Gene and Guys: This is the last iteration of the Bluechersaebel. From the original Austrian design, to England, to Germany..and in some places, still in use today. 250+ years of use, not a bad design.

    Dale

  5. #5
    Quote Originally Posted by Dale Martin View Post
    The Prussians sharpened their swords in wartime, and this model is indeed a combat weapon with sharpened blade. These grips were, in order, wood wrapped with leather and cord, bakelite and finally walnut with grooves...

    The so called parade weapons are the wimpy thin bladed models that cover up the sales sites, the real ones are not as numerous today..The extra purchase version would be nickel plated, blade and hilt, shiny painted or shiny nickel plated scabbard, depending on date of sale, and a grip that would be dipped wood or sharkskin and almost always with wire..

    The enlisted guys who bought the extra weapons almost always got the officers' versions, almost never the the plain fighting model..

    Dale
    Hi Dale,

    You've probobly seen a good many? In your experience, what percentage are sharpened?
    Mine has no traces of sharpening. Seems a big lump to drag to war without the option of really using it?
    They aren't really my area of interest at all, but the quality and the great sound it makes when you draw and sheath it, keeps it a place on the wall!
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  6. #6
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    Most of them dated after 1905 seem to be sharpened in my experience, a lot of the older ones are as made without any evidence of sharpening...This model has a scabbard lined with fir, which is the one of the things they did right...

    Dale

  7. #7
    Quote Originally Posted by Dale Martin View Post
    Most of them dated after 1905 seem to be sharpened in my experience, a lot of the older ones are as made without any evidence of sharpening...This model has a scabbard lined with fir, which is the one of the things they did right...

    Dale
    Hi Dale,

    Lined with fir?

  8. #8
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    Gene: Fir wood, cut into strips to fit against the blade. In my German publications it uses the words Tanneholz or Voere to name the wood...It is soft wood.

    Dale
    Last edited by Dale Martin; 01-27-2019 at 08:23 AM. Reason: add

  9. #9
    Quote Originally Posted by Dale Martin View Post
    Gene: Fir wood, cut into strips to fit against the blade. In my German publications it uses the words Tanneholz or Voere to name the wood...It is soft wood.

    Dale
    Hi Dale,

    Ah, I see. There's not much room. Does it still have the sprung plates on both sides to give that satisfying sound as it's drawn and sheathed?

  10. #10
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    Gene: It has the thin Blechstahl (Sheet Steel) brazed to the mouthpiece...Not the springy ones with the dent. The wood, after 100+ years has to be reversed for the next hundred ie: Left for Right, as it takes the shape of the inside of the scabbard tube and loses friction to hold the blade...

    Dale

  11. #11
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    Guys,

    I picked up a Police issue Prussian Model 1891 enlisted sword this weekend that I thought I would share. The Polizei nomenclature for this sword was "Sabel fur Berittene" (S.f.B.) or sword for mounted officers. The Fischer manual "Waffentechnischer Leitfaden fur die Ordnungspolizei" indicates the grip is Hartgummi (hard rubber) but as Dale says they will be found made of wood as well. The sword I picked up over the weekend was made by Simson Co. in 1915 and is Prussian marked and dated on the spine of the bright blade. The blade is also carefully sharpened as is often seen. The obverse guard is Government property marked "1920" and the underside of the guard is property marked to the Polizeiwehr Bayern (P.w.B.). The Bavarian Polizeiwehr was only in existence from 1919 to 1922 when it was broken up by the occupation authorities for being to militarized so it was only issued for a short period of time.
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    "You can't please everyone, so you have to please yourself." Ricky Nelson

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