Results 1 to 7 of 7

Thread: Kirschbaum and Weyersberg Logos

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2014
    Location
    Annandale, VA
    Posts
    864

    Kirschbaum and Weyersberg Logos

    When I see a Weyersberg king's head logo stamped by itself on the ricasso of a sword, I assume it predates the 1883 merger with Kirschbaum. I used to think the same applied to the Kirschbaum knight's head logo, but then I began to notice a number of what appeared to be post-1883 swords, some also stamped "Germany", which were stamped with a lone knight's head logo. I have little to no knowledge of German makers and the evolution of their logos. Do any of our members know if WKC continued to use the sole Knight's head logo after the merger, and if so, when and why? Did it also continue to use a sole king's head? When and for what purpose?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Birmingham Alabama
    Posts
    1,553
    After 1918, just a Ritter (Knight) head logo.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jul 2014
    Location
    Annandale, VA
    Posts
    864
    Dale, thanks for the response. I believe the swords to which I am referring date to before 1918. They are primarily variations of the US models introduced in 1872 and during the next 10 - 20 years, e.g.M1860/72 S&F swords and M1872/80 cavalry and field officer swords. Here is a picture of a late Horstmaan M1872 S&F:

    Name:  Late Horstmann WKC 1.JPG
Views: 80
Size:  35.2 KBName:  Late Horstmann WKC 2.JPG
Views: 82
Size:  89.6 KBName:  Late Horstmann WKC 3.JPG
Views: 81
Size:  41.6 KB

    If WKC used the Knight's head on these post 1883 swords, why didn't they also use the king's head? or did they?

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Birmingham Alabama
    Posts
    1,553
    I am only really sure of their domestic production for Germany. I suspect the "Ritterhelm" was used to indicate subcontracted blades for export. I have noted this on other US Swords too, and wondered, the German Language boards say it was an export mark, meaning that they only made the blade, but written sources are scarce on this..

    BTW: The German collectors call this a "Knight's Helm"...I do not know why, but our usage is different.

    Dale

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Central Coast NSW Australia
    Posts
    131
    Hi Dale,

    With Helm the traditional term applied to what we might call a medieval knight's large, full face helmet, might not Knight's Helm merely apply to the helmet trade mark by itself and Ritterhelm (German knight's helmet) to those items going overseas with a need to impress?
    “The Australian Light Horse attack on Beersheba was the last important cavalry charge in history and the last to win a resounding victory that altered the course of a war." Alec Hepburn

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Birmingham Alabama
    Posts
    1,553
    I am not sure, but suspect it was a way to identify a finished blade...perhaps they had some mix-ups earlier? The people running WK&C today have very little information, and they have even contacted me for history and such!!

    Dale

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Central Coast NSW Australia
    Posts
    131
    Dale,

    It is because you ARE the man to go to for all things German swords and bayonets. I hope that one day I will know 1/10th what you do. I always enjoy your ability to put across content in a really readable way. Thank you.

    George
    “The Australian Light Horse attack on Beersheba was the last important cavalry charge in history and the last to win a resounding victory that altered the course of a war." Alec Hepburn

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •