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Thread: brown stuff on p1897

  1. #1

    Strange p1897

    Hi all, just collected this 1897 pattern sword, my first infantry officer sword and my first English sword. I have a few questions, the blade is covered in this sticky brown stuff, i'm guessing it's old oil or something, i need to get it off, what would you use?

    The blade feels like it has been sharp at one point, unfortunately no serial #. The blade thickens at the tip, is this normal on these?

    I'm guessing that it is not possible to find out what regiment and officer the sword belonged to, i cant find any stamps and no initials.
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    Last edited by Niklas Ljungblom; 05-28-2019 at 12:22 AM.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
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    The dumbell shaped blade came in 1892 and has Queen Victorias cypher etched on it so the infantry sword dates between 1892-1901. The blade tips should not become thicker, can you provide a closeup photo?

  3. #3
    Hi. Thanks. The handguard has Edward VIIs monogram on it.

    I will provide pictures later today but the tip is thicker for sure. Do i have a frankensword??

  4. #4
    Join Date
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    Quote Originally Posted by Niklas Ljungblom View Post
    Hi. Thanks. The handguard has Edward VIIs monogram on it.

    I will provide pictures later today but the tip is thicker for sure. Do i have a frankensword??
    Hi Niklas,

    Unlikely - officers were ordered to replace the handguards on their swords where necessary (ie where these bore a royal cypher) on the accession of a new monarch, but it wasn't required to also change the blades. It just means your officer served from some time in the reign of Victoria to some time into the reign of Edward VII.

    John
    "If I can't be a good example to others, at least let me be a horrible warning".

  5. #5
    Difficult to get a good pic but it is clearly visible here
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  6. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by John Hart View Post
    Hi Niklas,

    Unlikely - officers were ordered to replace the handguards on their swords where necessary (ie where these bore a royal cypher) on the accession of a new monarch, but it wasn't required to also change the blades. It just means your officer served from some time in the reign of Victoria to some time into the reign of Edward VII.

    John
    Sry, did not see your reply. Thanks alot

  7. #7
    Join Date
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    I think thickness/width of the point is fine, it just looks like the edge has been flattened. Is it the same on the other side?

  8. #8
    Quote Originally Posted by MikeShowers View Post
    I think thickness/width of the point is fine, it just looks like the edge has been flattened. Is it the same on the other side?
    yes, same. To me it looks intentional, i don't understand why but still..
    Last edited by Niklas Ljungblom; 05-28-2019 at 10:44 AM. Reason: spelling

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
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    Kingston area, Ontario Canada
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    The edge at the blade tip is ground flat to prevent injury on parade etc., apparently this sword was never service sharpened. Swords were made this way but this example has exaggerated dulling of the blade. Also possible this was done later in its life to make it less likely to cut by accident, we will never know.

  10. #10
    Quote Originally Posted by Will Mathieson View Post
    The edge at the blade tip is ground flat to prevent injury on parade etc., apparently this sword was never service sharpened. Swords were made this way but this example has exaggerated dulling of the blade. Also possible this was done later in its life to make it less likely to cut by accident, we will never know.
    Ah, well, there you go, thanks.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Dublin, Ireland
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    346
    I would use grade 0000 for brown stuff on the blade.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Mar 2017
    Location
    Stockholm, Sweden
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    193
    In the past steel would sometimes be coated with linseed oil to prevent rust. I’m sure you can try paint stripper to try and remove it to start with.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Mar 2002
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    857
    Yes paint stripper first!
    hc3

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