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Thread: Rough Bavarian Sabre

  1. #1

    Rough Bavarian Sabre

    Hi All
    Can anybody give me any advice about this sabre, as you can see it's missing it's backstrap and original grip. Can this sword be restored, if so, is it worth it worth doing, personally I'd like to restore it.
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  2. #2
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    If this is a full sized weapon, parts are almost non existent , if it is a lighter private purchase weapon, I might be able to help.

    Dale

  3. #3
    Hi Dale
    The sword is full sized and has been service sharpened, the monarchs cypher is on the blade.
    It's interesting that you should mention private purchase, as there is an inscription on the backstrap that translates to " for a trip to Munich", which suggests that it was given to a civilian as a present. Munich must have been a dangerous place if you needed to carry around a military sword with you.

    Cheers
    Graham

  4. #4
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    Lightbulb Bavarian Hilt Design

    Graham: Here is a Bavarian Mod 1891 (more or less) This a shortened version of the usual Bavarian Blücher Saber, however it was made short, as it is dated 1902. The hilt on this weapon, minus the guard is the same as yours.

    If you could find one of these or the parts like the backstrap, then you could fix the Saber you have depicted.

    Note the smooth capstan rivet work, typical of this era...Leather over wood with cord wrap for the grip.

    If you can, show the inscription about the trip to München...

    Dale
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  5. #5
    Hi Dale
    Here is a picture of the inscription. To be honest I know an engineer who might be able to make me a backstrap for the sword now I know what it looks like, thanks for the photos. The main problem that I can see is getting a correct grip for it. Funnily enough the one on it now is of the right construction, but obviously from a contemporary fencing sword
    Cheers
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  6. #6
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    Graham: That inscription is the name of the retailer who sold it...

    Dale

  7. #7
    Thanks Dale

    Cheers
    Graham

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by G.BARBER View Post
    The main problem that I can see is getting a correct grip for it. Funnily enough the one on it now is of the right construction, but obviously from a contemporary fencing sword
    Cheers
    Graham
    Hi, Graham, are you sure of that? I can almost see on the grip of your sword the faint line left by the original backstrap. I'd say the grip may be original, too. A bit shrunken and distorted, but maybe original. Do not discard it too fast.

    Best,
    Juan
    SI, SI
    NO, NON

  9. #9
    Hi Juan
    Yes you're right, there are signs of a backstrap on the grip, but I still think it's from another sword. I believe the sword is the 1826 Bavarian pattern Cavalry/Artillery sabre, from what I've seen of the earlier examples of the model the grip seems to be much more robust than the one on it now. I do think though that the grip is contemporary with the sword, but from a smaller one.

    Cheers
    Graham

  10. #10
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    Lightbulb Bavarian Mod 1826 dated 1994.

    G Barber and Fellows; I finally found my example, it was in the hoard, but on the bottom of the stack. E&F HORSTER/SOLINGEN is the maker. Dated 1894. The scabbard has several cancelled unit markings, including 6th Chevauleger, but that means the scabbard is older than the sword, however, the last unit mark, identical is, 2.T. B. for the 2nd (Bavarian) Train Battalion.

    The blade has the motto "IN TREUE FEST" which was required, on this model after 1891 or so. The Bavarians did not require this motto on the Prussian designed KD 89, as it was not a Bavarian design and the adoption of it was forced by the military agreement with the Prussians.

    The grip is wood, with cord wrap, and the usual plastic tool handle dip---(Yes they did that then!) BTW: This how one repairs these style grips, and it works fine!

    Note the scabbard has only one ring and is blackened, and that the ring has no band, a typical Bavarian feature..

    Dale
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