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Thread: Khor sword

  1. #26
    Join Date
    Apr 2018
    Location
    Vladivostok, Russia
    Posts
    202
    Hello.
    Gene, is it a Muslim symbol or is it still a stylized image of Shyva?
    The moon and crescent symbol has been used in various cultures and religions, how to understand where the blade was imported from or maybe the symbol was already applied in India when the handle was mounted on the blade.
    With best regards, Vladimir.

  2. #27
    Join Date
    Apr 2018
    Location
    Vladivostok, Russia
    Posts
    202
    Thanks again for the answer in the topic.
    Last edited by Vladimir Sukhomlinov; 09-12-2019 at 04:40 PM.

  3. #28
    Hi Vladimir,

    Many trade blades from Europe were decorated with symbols.
    As you rightly point out, these are universal symbols common to most cultures.
    If you do a search, you will see many blades from the 18th/19th century with these designs on them.
    Like this one from Artzi's site:
    Attached Images Attached Images  

  4. #29
    Join Date
    Apr 2018
    Location
    Vladivostok, Russia
    Posts
    202
    Hi Gene.
    Yes, the picture on the blade shown by you is almost the same as on mine, only on mine it is pretty much erased.
    I found information that the engraving of the image of the sun and the crescent with a human face is peculiar to German masters of the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. Straight and curved blades were popular in Eastern Europe and the Caucasus. Caucasians loved them very much and often used for drafts, especially Circassian. In the Caucasus, such blades were called Abbas-Mirza.
    So we can conclude that the blade on my banner was brought from Europe or it came to India from the Caucasus.
    In his book Indian and Eastern Cold Steel, Lord Egerton, describing the weapons of the Muslims of Decar and Mysore, indicated that modern European weapons have been widely used in Mysore and South India since the days of Geider Ali and his successor. His workshops were located in Seringopatam, Bengaluru, Chitaldrug and Nagar.
    During the capture of Seringopotam, many different weapons were captured. Many of these trophies were delivered to England by the East India Company and were gifted to high-ranking individuals. Thus, in private collections were some examples of this period.

    Since the Talvar came to me from England, it is possible that he was captured during the capture of Seringopatam and transported to England (but this is only my guess ).
    For me, the topic was very informative.
    With best regards, Vladimir.

  5. #30
    Join Date
    Apr 2018
    Location
    Vladivostok, Russia
    Posts
    202
    Here is a similar image on a clique of a Caucasian saber (shashka).
    Attached Images Attached Images   

  6. #31
    HI Vladimir,

    I'd have guessed that it was European and likely German.
    As to how it came to be in the UK, we do have a very long and 'complicated' history with India.
    There are huge numbers of weapons that were brought back from our meddlings in that part of the world.
    Identifying a piece to a single battle is nearly impossible as we were involved in so many.

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