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Thread: New Acquisition Pat. 1822 Inf. Off. sword

  1. #1
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    New Acquisition Pat. 1822 Inf. Off. sword

    I just picked up a nice early Pat.1822 sword. Though the brass guard is a little deformed, nothing is broken or broken off. It's the early pipe-back quill pointed blade with the name "Reeves" on the ricasso. There's even some of the blue left on the blade in the engraving. In the same lot was a Snider Enfield bayonet, the classic "lunger", but both blades lack the scabbard. There was a brass scabbard that came with the sword, but it's for a straight blade of some sort, not the 1822 pattern. If I can find my camera, I'll take a few pics just for general interest sake.

  2. #2
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    Now with pics. With care and patience, I've taken out about 50% of the damage to the guard. I'm working on making jigs out of some odds and ends of hardwood to take out some of the more difficult bends. The damage led me to believe that the brass was fairly malleable, and such has proved to be case.. I'm quite pleased that the blade and grip are in such good condition. If the gods are kind and I ever find a scabbard looking for a mate, this will be a very nice piece. On a side note, I had the pleasure of meeting Will Mathieson at the Etobicoke Militaria show. I love talking to people who really know their field of interest.
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  3. #3
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    Please photograph and share the steps of your hilt repair with the jigs. I was mulling over jigs for repair of a brass hilt i have in my collection.

  4. #4
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    It hadn't occurred to me to do so. Some have already been discarded but, moving forward, I'll take pics.

  5. #5
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    Many sword problems can be remedied at home if given careful thought before moving to the actual work required. Experience in working with metals--jewelry, applied arts--really helps. Enjoy your repaired sword!
    Tom Donoho

  6. #6
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    Lawrence that's a definite improvement from what the sword was before. I'm told these particular Reeves swords were made for EIC officers.

  7. #7
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    I'd love to see the jigs and your processes, Lawrence. Very nice sword.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Will Mathieson View Post
    Lawrence that's a definite improvement from what the sword was before. I'm told these particular Reeves swords were made for EIC officers.
    You may well be correct. One thing that I found puzzling, and perhaps you can shed some light on this, is the fact that the brass pommel and top of the grip are plain and lacking the ornamentation I see on the 1822 infantry sword.

  9. #9
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    The brass guards on these particular swords lend to straightening better than other brass hilted infantry swords. The guard is a softer sheet type of brass and does not have bars that are somewhat triangular in shape as the cast brass type. The cast type tends to crack when bent and further crack when returned to shape.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by LawrenceN View Post
    You may well be correct. One thing that I found puzzling, and perhaps you can shed some light on this, is the fact that the brass pommel and top of the grip are plain and lacking the ornamentation I see on the 1822 infantry sword.
    It would be easier to manufacture and my guess is these backstraps were formed and not cast.

  11. #11
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    Moving forward, I took some pics of things I used to take the worst of the damage out of the guard. I used a wooden Jorgenson clamp for some of it, 1" dowel and 1-1/2" half round. I used hardwood 1 X 3 and screwed a stop on one end and used another stop that I could re-position and screw into the board to vary the distance apart. I'd then use the clamp and dowel or half round to gently pull the brass into shape. You need 4 hands sometimes and it's very fiddly work. I used double-sided sticky tape to attach the dowel or half round one jaw of the clamp. If I had to do this again, I'd have used a "C" clamp instead of the "G" clamp. Though the "G" clamp is quicker to set, it was very hard on the arthritis in my hands and I'm paying for that now. With the "C" clamp, you have finer control of the screw. Anyway, here are some pics of the jigs I used and some pics of the guard now. It's not 100%, but it is 100% better than it was. Enjoy.
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    Last edited by LawrenceN; 09-19-2019 at 05:35 AM.

  12. #12
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    Thank you, most interesting (and good work from a fellow arthritis sufferer)!

  13. #13
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    My last question, to anyone following this post, is to scarcity. I know very little about East India Co. regalia or accoutrements. Is this sword scarcer, more common, or on par with a pat.1822 Victorian military sword? From what I've been able to discover in my research, EIC equipment doesn't seem to be very common compared to military items.

  14. #14
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    The mutiny EIC ceased to exist as a military force by 1858. These EIC swords would tend to be more plentiful in the UK. The EIC army was twice the size of the British army at their height in the early 1800's. Why we don't see many EIC swords today is anyone's guess, I suppose in India they would recycle steel and brass.

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