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Thread: Sword of the Masons or Grange?

  1. #1

    Sword of the Masons or Grange?

    Greetings:

    I was wondering if anyone might know what this sword might represent.

    Here's a picture of a relative from the 1870's.

    He was active in the Grange. I'm not sure if he was a Mason. Any ideas of what the sword is from?

    Thanks in advance.

  2. #2
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    Knights of Columbus by the knights head sword.

  3. #3
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    Dug out my reference and the initials on the scabbard are AOUW for Ancient Order of United Workmen. Founded at Meadville PA in 1868. Ref: Pg 60 of The American Fraternal Sword

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Will Mathieson View Post
    Knights of Columbus by the knights head sword.
    The knight's head pommel was common across all the fraternal knighthood. Masonic Knights Templar swords: https://newlondonregalia.com/

  5. #5
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    Welcome aboard

    I think Will has it, as spotting the acronym on the scabbard. FWIW, the Knights of Columbus swords are more usually a bust of Columbus or a flying eagle on a round pommel (The Navigator).

    It was not unusual for individuals to belong to more than one group. Here is some more background for the AOUW

    https://www.phoenixmasonry.org/mason...alism/aouw.htm

    I am curious on the date on the photo, as I would have actually put the form a bit later.

    The Hamilton, Kaplan and Marino book is the current new testament.
    https://gunandswordcollector.com/pro...aternal-sword/

    Well prefaced and introduced by Hamilton, his thoughts include that the book shares only a part of what one may encounter.

    I was looking at the belt buckle and was making no sense of it and wasn't seeing the scabbard acronym, which is pretty definitive. I more associate this hilt form with Pettibone and imports after 1880 but then I see a slim cravat vs a later tie. Still I wonder a bit about the date of 1870.

    Cheers
    GC
    Last edited by Glen C.; 09-18-2019 at 07:37 AM.

  6. #6
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    I cannot see it clearly and lack knowledge in these fraternal swords but black grip seems to be more often Knights of Columbus or KKK. When did the double top suspension ring come into style? Eric
    The unlimited power of the sword is not in the hands of either the federal or state governments, but, where I trust in God it will ever remain, in the hands of the people." --- Tench Coxe

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Glen C. View Post
    I was looking at the belt buckle and was making no sense of it and wasn't seeing the scabbard acronym, which is pretty definitive. I more associate this hilt form with Pettibone and imports after 1880 but then I see a slim cravat vs a later tie. Still I wonder a bit about the date of 1870.

    Cheers
    GC
    The lack of a crease in the trousers also suggests an earlier date. I am certainly no expert on clothing styles, but an 1870 to early 1880s date looks about right to me.

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