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Thread: Your Best Sword of 2019

  1. #1
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    Your Best Sword of 2019

    Gents,

    Christmas is over so it is now time, once again, to post your best sword acquisition of 2019. It does not have to be the most expensive or the rarest sword in your collection, just the one you liked the best this year.

    I will start off with a WWII German Prison Police (Strafvollzugsbeamte) Officer sword that I picked up at a militaria show this spring. This is the Carl Eickhorn manufactured sword, in gold color, they called their "Sabel fur Strafvollzugsbeamte Nr. 1728". The identical sword with a silver colored hilt was titled their "Sabel fur Justizbeamte Nr. 1763". These are difficult swords to find due to the small size of the Reichsjustizverwaltung.


    At any rate, these swords were manufactured by several makers but the Eickhorn example is perhaps the most impressive with a large sculpted eagle head pommel and a very detailed hilt. Another interesting thing about this Eickhorn sword is that the same distinctive eagle and swastika motif found on the obverse langet is repeated on the reverse side. This sword was a registered design for Eickhorn and the hilt was always rendered in aluminum and either gilt plated or finished in white metal. This Eickhorn sword has been reproduced in brass casting but those with brass hilts are postwar fakes.


    Another interesting thing about these swords were the sword knots that could be worn on them. Reichsjustizverwaltung regulations (DBeklV) published in 1942 listed both a Faustriemen and Portepee but a cloth Troddel was not worn. An all green Faustriemen, or one with green and gold stripes in the ball, could be worn on short bayonets or swords. Portepee with either green and gold, or carmine and gold, stripes in the ball could be worn on both bayonets and swords. The regulations also state that either a Wehrmacht or a Polizei Portepee could also be worn on the swords depending upon the status of the wearer. So, a wide variety of sword knots could be worn by Justice- or Prison- Officials (Beamte). I have put a Polizei-Offizier Portepee on this particular sword as was allowed by regulations.

    So show what you picked up this year.

    George
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    "You can't please everyone, so you have to please yourself." Ricky Nelson

  2. #2
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    I have to say that this cutlass is my best acquistion of 2019. 1862 dated Ames “Officer’s” Cutlass dated and inspected with its original scabbard. It was once in the collection of Harold L Peterson, obtained from the Peterson family by Norm Flayderman and subsequently sold by him in 1987. I acquired it from the collector that purchased it from Norm.
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  3. #3
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    U.S. M1911 saber

    George that German eagle head is one nice piece and the cutlass very appealing Skipper. I have picked up some nice swords this year with the great economy, but with out a doubt this is my biggest prize. M1911
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    The unlimited power of the sword is not in the hands of either the federal or state governments, but, where I trust in God it will ever remain, in the hands of the people." --- Tench Coxe

  4. #4
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    1822 pattern NCO sword, with George !V monogram, and so one of the first versions of that model. Fullered blade rather than pipe back because it's the Sergeants version.
    Personally I think these early ones are just a bit more elegant than the later.
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  5. #5
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    Nice swords guys!

    That USN cutout Navy cutlass is rare and to have the Peterson collection provenance is great. I really like the original scabbard as well.

    Eric, your Model 1911 Springfield Armory saber is top notch. Another very rare sword in very nice un-messed with condition.

    And, David I really like your 1822 pattern NCO sword. I have an affinity for Sergeant's swords and this is a George the IV looker. Did you get a scabbard with it?
    "You can't please everyone, so you have to please yourself." Ricky Nelson

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by George Wheeler View Post
    Nice swords guys!

    That USN cutout Navy cutlass is rare and to have the Peterson collection provenance is great. I really like the original scabbard as well.

    Eric, your Model 1911 Springfield Armory saber is top notch. Another very rare sword in very nice un-messed with condition.

    And, David I really like your 1822 pattern NCO sword. I have an affinity for Sergeant's swords and this is a George the IV looker. Did you get a scabbard with it?
    Alas it came without a scabbard, but at that date it would have been leather with brass chape and frog button. As you wrote , some nice pieces turning up here already.
    For some reason here in the UK cutlasses rarely turn up and similarly for the last pattern (1908) cavalry sword.

  7. #7
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    My favorite acquisition was neither rare nor expensive. It is a Horstmann M1840 NCO sword. The Horstmann M1840 NCO sword is unique among all the various makers of this model in that it has a turned-down inner counterguard. Horstmann sold these to State militia and volunteer units and even a few to the Federal government. What makes it my favorite acquisition, however, is that this example came with its original white frog which showed it was in fact a M1859 musician’s sword. In October 1859, the Marines adopted the Horstman M1840 NCO sword for wear by musicians of the Corps. In 1861 the Marines asked for the design to be modified by removing the rear counterguards and for a number of years this was done, but the original design was restored c.1869 and remained the uniform model until c.1887 when the so-called M1875 with the “U.S.M.C.”-etched blade was introduced. Ordinarily there is no way to distinguish a M1840 NCO sword from a M1859 USMC sword – they are identical. Although often advertised as Marine swords, the bulk of the Horstmann swords of this pattern found today were probably originally procured for non-USMC units. The white frog on my sword, with its faintly green impressions from long association with the inner counterguard, shows this is a Marine musician, not an Army NCO, sword. Marine musicians wore their swords with white frogs; Army NCOs used black.

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    Here is a photo of a Marine with a M1859 musician’s sword. From other details of his uniform, the picture probably dates from the 1880s:

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  8. #8
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    I'd have to pick this 1770's ish British cavalry sword and the Gordons sword of Major Miller-Wallnutt who was killed at wagon Hill by a boer general.
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  9. #9
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    I suppose the best old blade in terms of condition is an as new 1909 Argentine short sword. A couple of other swords but one a modern Del Tin 2132 and another an additional Ames militia sword. Two smallswords, with one stuck in customs or transit for the past couple of weeks. A late 18th century hunting sword rounds out the year for me.

    The swords posted thus far really knock my socks off. I am really winding down, still waiting for that one right eagle (while getting into trouble). Try as I might, the Del Tin was bargain basement price and a model I have wanted for decades.

    Cheers
    GC
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  10. #10
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    1821 Pattern light cavalry officers sword

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  11. #11
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    Some nice swords turning up here.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by David R View Post
    Some nice swords turning up here.
    Absolutely right David. It looks like some of our colleagues have been having very good luck in locating swords that they have been after for awhile. That is always nice.
    "You can't please everyone, so you have to please yourself." Ricky Nelson

  13. #13
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    Here's a circa-1650 felddeggen I acquired from a fellow forumite this year. It's the rare pewter hilt form with a thumb-ring typical of northern Germany and the Low Countries. This one's got an as-yet-unidentified maker's mark on the bottom of the cross guard, and the usual running wolf of Passau mark on both sides of the blade, along with the auspicious number 1414. The guard and blade were coated long ago in what I assume was linseed oil, but the coating long since failed, allowing corrosion to settle in. The rust has since been deactivated.
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  14. #14
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    What is that grip made out of? It does not appear to made from same high iron content of guard and pommel. It is stunning. Eric
    The unlimited power of the sword is not in the hands of either the federal or state governments, but, where I trust in God it will ever remain, in the hands of the people." --- Tench Coxe

  15. #15
    Quote Originally Posted by Will Mathieson View Post
    I'd have to pick this 1770's ish British cavalry sword and the Gordons sword of Major Miller-Wallnutt who was killed at wagon Hill by a boer general.
    Kudos on your beautiful 1770's Horse-Sword, Will.
    Peace, Love, SWORDS!

  16. #16
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    Prussian French model Cuirassier Palosch

    I got this from Europe recently. Dated 1831 it is a Prussian issued French AN XIII. The Prussians, when repairing this model added their own grip, with 18 winds of wire to replace the French 11 winds. Not all got this modification, it was done during overhaul at arsenals. I think we all know what the usual Mod AN XIII looks like, so I have posted the relevant pix.

    The blade has traces of the French inscription, but they are very had to catch with a cell phone. This one still has the hatchet point, it was never modified to the symmetrical point. Same scabbard as the French, with only one minor change, the rivets that retain the mouthpiece are replaced by screws in the German style.
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  17. #17
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    Sabre de Cuirassier An XIII

    I bought a few cavalry sabres this year, but this one certainly is not easy to find: a Sabre de Cuirassier An XI/XIII with original An XI heavy metal scabbard.

    Almost all of the An XIII cuirassier sabres you find today remained in service after 1815 and were re-equipped with a new metal scabbard type 1816, had their hatched point changed into a spear point and received rack number on their hilt (and scabbard).

    The blade is marked [I]Mfture Imple du Klingenthal novembre 1810 dating it previous to the Russian campaign.

    The poinçons on both the blade and the hilt are those of:
    Claude Marion, inspecteur de décembre 1808 à juin 1811,
    Jean Georges Bick, contrôleur de 1ère classe de février 1809 à août 1824 (using this poinçon until 1812),
    François Louis Lobstein, réviseur de juin 1804 à juillet 1821 (only on the ricasso)

    Only the "4" marking remains unidentified. There was a similar "6" on my Sabre de Dragon An XI, so maybe these are regimental numbers.
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  18. #18
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    My 1680s Austrian/German Reiterdegen cleaned, oiled and waxed in all its glory, ready for Christmas 2019.

    It was previously discussed here: http://www.swordforum.com/vb4/showth...light=Magnus+K.
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    Last edited by Magnus K; 12-29-2019 at 05:27 AM.

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by Eric Fairbanks View Post
    What is that grip made out of? It does not appear to made from same high iron content of guard and pommel. It is stunning. Eric
    I believe it is an alloy of pewter, possibly with a high sliver content.

  20. #20
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    It is beautiful as is Georges eagle head, having a small case of envy.
    The unlimited power of the sword is not in the hands of either the federal or state governments, but, where I trust in God it will ever remain, in the hands of the people." --- Tench Coxe

  21. #21
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    Hi all, 2019 was a GREAT year of acquisitions for my collection. I think I've finally established a focus for my collection of edged weapons - Infantry pattern swords associated with Canada (especially regimentally marked blades), Imperial German damascus swords and Indo-Persian weapons. I was able to scratch my collecting interests on all fronts. I'm still waiting on a spectacular Canadian sword to arrive, hopefully before 2020 to make the cut for 2019 but perhaps I'll save that for 2020.

    One of the most interesting swords for 2019 was a piquet weight Grenadier-hilted Infantry Officers sword that showed up at the local gun show. Regimental hilts and blades are a passion of mine and this sword "spoke" to me. The blade was personalized to Capt. V. W. Odlum, the blade also has the badge of the 100th Winnipeg Grenadiers on the blade, the hilt being the grenadiers pattern for George V.

    Capt. Odlum became a very prominent Canadian soldier, diplomat and statesman and commanded the 7th CEF, ultimately becoming brigadier general. In his day he was considered a VIP. His sword would appear to date from his early military career after the Boer War and prior to WW1. His wiki page does not mention what his connection was with Winnipeg but he is mentioned in the Militia Lists associated with the 100th from as early as 1906. I'm still researching this sword and will hopefully figure out how he came to be a captain in Winnipeg while living in Vancouver!

    Happy New Year!

    Greg

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Victor_Odlum
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    Last edited by Greg Nehring; 12-29-2019 at 09:32 PM.

  22. #22
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    Excellent find Greg, Canadian swords with provenance are few and far between.

  23. #23
    Quote Originally Posted by Greg Nehring View Post
    Hi all, 2019 was a GREAT year of acquisitions for my collection. I think I've finally established a focus for my collection of edged weapons - Infantry pattern swords associated with Canada (especially regimentally marked blades), Imperial German damascus swords and Indo-Persian weapons. I was able to scratch my collecting interests on all fronts. I'm still waiting on a spectacular Canadian sword to arrive, hopefully before 2020 to make the cut for 2019 but perhaps I'll save that for 2020.

    One of the most interesting swords for 2019 was a piquet weight Grenadier-hilted Infantry Officers sword that showed up at the local gun show. Regimental hilts are blades are a passion of mine and this sword "spoke" to me. The blade was personalized to Capt. V. W. Odlum, the blade also has the badge of the 100th Winnipeg Grenadiers on the blade, the hilt being the grenadiers pattern for George V.

    Capt. Odlum became a very prominent Canadian soldier, diplomat and statesman and commanded the 7th CEF, ultimately becoming brigadier general. In his day he was considered a VIP. His sword would appear to date from his early military career after the Boer War and prior to WW1. His wiki page does not mention what his connection was with Winnipeg but he is mentioned in the Militia Lists associated with the 100th from as early as 1906. I'm still researching this sword and will hopefully figure out how he came to be a captain in Winnipeg while living in Vancouver!

    Happy New Year!

    Greg

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Victor_Odlum
    Look forward to hearing about the "Spectacular Canadian sword". Awesome!

  24. #24
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    Friends, this topic is devoted to swords purchased in 2019, however I want to show here a rather rare bayonet for the Portuguese Mannlicher rifle of the 1896 model, which I purchased in 2019.
    Since the theme of my collecting are bayonets for rifles of the Mannlicher system of various modifications, and not just US cavalry swords.
    Here is some information about creating this rifle:
    The Portuguese Espingarda Portuguesa Modelo 1896 rifle (referred to as Mosqueton e Carabina Mo. 1896 in some literature) is essentially a modified rifle of the Mannlicher arr. 1893(Romanian contract of 1893), commissioned by Portugal, which was looking for a suitable rifle to rearm its army.
    Portuguese rifle arr. 1896 differs from a rifle arr. 1893, only a shorter barrel and minor design changes, and carbines arr. 1896 had a tire for attaching a bayonet, unlike carbines arr. 1893
    The rifle Espingarda Portuguesa Modelo 1896 had a total length of 1099 mm., With a barrel length of 603 mm., And weighed 3.4 kg. Sighting range with a lowered frame aiming bar from 300 meters to 1800 meters with a raised. The magazine capacity is 5 rounds of caliber 6.5 × 53 mm. The rifle stock had a straight neck.
    According to information contained in the archives of the Steyr factory, in 1896, Portugal purchased the first batch of rifles in the amount of 7400 pieces, named in the contract books, as Mannlicher M. 93/6 Marine. In total, from 1896 to 1900, 15,900 pieces of such rifles and carbines were purchased in Steyr. Purchased short rifles were used in the Navy, and carbines in cavalry and artillery.
    Although the rifle of the Mannlicher arr. 1896 was not accepted into service, it had a long life in the Portuguese army, despite the fact that in 1904 the Mauser-Verguiero 6.5x58 caliber rifle was adopted (Mauser-Verguiero Model 1904). In 1916, in the army units, there were 5,810 Mannlicher carbines (1,053 in the cavalry brigade and from 360 to 572, distributed in 4 TO and E divisions).
    In 1931, there were 2,996 carbines in the cavalry units, and 2,155 pieces in the infantry regiments of the 13th, 22nd and 47th. In 1946, the surviving weapon was redone at the factories of Braso da Prata, under 5.6 ml. training cartridge and was used by cadets of military educational institutions of Portugal. In the 1960s, short rifles arr. 1896 was still used for training by the Marines.
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    Last edited by Vladimir Sukhomlinov; 12-29-2019 at 11:35 PM.

  25. #25
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    Vladimir,

    Sharp pointy things like bayonets are also OK for this thread. It is really whatever is your favorite edged weapon this year.

    Great swords (edged weapons) being shown so far. I always like this thread because we all get to see nice things that are often outside of our own collecting interests.

    Keep it up.

    George
    "You can't please everyone, so you have to please yourself." Ricky Nelson

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