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Thread: Bavarian Officers' Swords--How Good Are They

  1. #1
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    Bavarian Officers' Swords--How Good Are They

    Well, the title says it all. Just wondering how battle worthy such swords were. They are handsome looking but were they just for dress?
    Tom Donoho

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    Post some examples.

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    Can you be a little more specific as to a timeline and type? Are you addressing the slim degen type of the mid 19th century? The larger sabres? Later 1889 types?

    Curious minds and all that.

    I am always quite drawn to these types
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    I have a lesser landwehr (sp?) type that is quite capable

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    Cheers
    GC

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    How about the ones c. 1880 and forward? Thanks.
    Tom Donoho

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    Isn't that still a little less than specific question? Most that I can think of, aside from the gussied up military field models still go back to light dress swords that were around decades before (ie the degen posted above which well be of the period you mention). Can you post an example of what you are looking to discuss?

    Cheers
    GC

  6. #6
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    They are often found on eBay--nice swords in good shape for 300.00 - 750.00 USD or so. I often wonder why so cheap as they look like nice swords/sabers, perhaps intended for dress, but nonetheless real swords. Hilts are often one piece of brass, reverse P or D shaped with cast ornamentation and some with bakelite grips. See attached pix for examples.
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    Tom Donoho

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    Tom: The Schwerer Reiter sword, the last one shown, came from me. It is combat ready..By regulation, all the extra purchase swords had to be battleworthy, even the diplomatic swords are tempered and made well enough to fight with, I do not know for how long, but they are real blades.

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    Thanks, Dale. I was hoping you would jump in and was going to PM you if no word from you soon. I like the Schwerer Reiter sword. Any pix of an officer's "model"?

    I didn't doubt that they were real blades, I was just wondering how good they are. The blades on civilian court swords (at least the British ones) are real blades and the hollow-ground type is surprisingly quite strong.

    Is there a free study source for the blades of the non-dominant countries of the German Empire--more than Prussia, I mean?
    Last edited by T. Donoho; 02-02-2020 at 10:48 PM.
    Tom Donoho

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    Not that I know of, most of the information I have is from German Language Sites and books...all in German..

    That Schwerer Reiter Palosch is not an Officers' Sword. It is the official/regulation pattern carried by troopers...I think I posted the issue and that one here once and the differences were minor.

    Dale

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    The sample I posted in the pic is a trooper's sword--yes, I figured that was the case from the lack of adornment. Is there an officer's version of this sword?

    I have visited a couple German language sword sites and was able to follow them okay.

    Thanks for your help.
    Tom Donoho

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    T: The officers models sometimes have three branches, rather than two, and the end of the hilt is bend down more than the troopers model. There are a lot of variations in Bavarian Schwerer Reiter Swords...

    Dale

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    The only one I have is a trooper chevauxleger sword with a pipe back and quill point and it looks a serious business. Very sharp. The scabbard does not match as it is from an Uhlan regiment, althought it is a perfect fit.

    Oops sorry... Officers you meant...
    Last edited by Javier Ramos; 02-05-2020 at 05:17 AM.
    La vida amable, el enemigo hombre fuerte, ordinario el peligro, natural la defensa, la Ciencia para conseguirla infalible, su estudio forçoso, y el exercicio necessario conviene al que huviere de ser Diestro, no ignore la teorica, para que en la practica, el cuerpo, el braço, y los instrumentos obren lo conveniente a su perfeccion. --Don Luis Pacheco de Narvaez.

  13. #13
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    Thanks for that info.
    Tom Donoho

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