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Thread: Rare German boarding cutlass P1849

  1. #1

    Rare German boarding cutlass P1849

    Hi
    Got this rare German boarding cutlass P1849. Only 1270pcs. made. Similar with French boarding cutlass P1833, gilt with French boarding cutlass P1811. Blade lenght 67.6cm.Gilt not originaly painted and scabard tip not original, but looks replaced at that age. I put more info about this cutlass, but I translate this info from Germany with google translate.
    It can often be observed that weapons that come from submerged states or confederations of states
    forgotten or misclassified. The latter happens all the more when similar weapons from other states
    exist. At this point we shall report on the duck saber of the fleet of the German Confederation or the Imperial Fleet
    will. This often happens to this model because, for example, the French "saber de bord modèle 1833"
    confused or incorrectly described as "Saber of the Austrian Navy (French type) 1849". These
    Gerhard Seifert already showed problems with the French in the German Weapons Journal 1973 (issue 6, p. 609)
    "Saber de bord modèle an XI", to which the German cutlass looks confusingly similar. But first
    another look at history.The story of the duck saber. In Frankfurt a. M. came to the advice of the Minister of the Navy, whose duties
    The Trade Minister Duckwitz was taken together to form a naval technical commission. In these
    Commission sent the large German states of Austria and Prussia and the neighboring states of the North and
    Baltic Sea representative. They had to advise on all naval matters and to make suggestions for development.
    This also happened with regard to the armament and especially the duck saber. The pattern (or sample)
    The company Schnitzler & Kirschbaum from Solingen became a saber on December 27, 1848
    submitted to the Commission, Prince Adalbert of Prussia. In the important for armament equipment
    Meeting on January 30, 1849, among other things, the duck saber presented was determined as a model. February 28th
    In 1849 the Reich Minister of Commerce and the Navy finally ordered 1,270 duck sabers from Schnitzler &
    Cherry tree in Solingen. When ordering, it was expressly requested that
    the blade inside with an anchor and the other side with the
    Imperial eagle should be provided. The scabbard fittings should be made of brass
    are manufactured. Furthermore, the weapons had to be examined and tested, such as
    it was prescribed for Prussian weapons. A contract
    finally about the delivery of the duck sabers (and other naked weapons)
    signed on March 8, 1849. The company offered a free upgrade
    on March 31, 1849, to "paint in the furnace" the weapons to be delivered, instead of as in
    to provide the model weapon with oil varnish. This was on April 3, 1849 too
    accepted.The cuttersabers were to be sent in four deliveries, on April 5, 150
    Pieces, 150 pieces on April 15, 250 pieces on March 1 and finally 720 pieces on March 28. Whether now
    all 1,270 weapons were made by Schnitzler & Kirschbaum or subcontracted to others
    Companies have been awarded, can no longer be determined with absolute certainty. The
    Presumption is obvious, because with all competition among the Solingen companies you had to
    Large orders (there were also 500 infantry sabers, 600 enter hatchets and 300 enter pikes
    ordered) because of the limited technical and personnel production capacities
    be worked. This assumption is reinforced by the fact that the Weyersberg company
    Reich Minister of Commerce and the Navy on March 17, 1849, 50 side rifles "in
    very precise correspondence of the model intended for this "as a patriotic gift. At this point must
    note that the subcontracted suppliers are not concerned with their company name, e.g. B. on the ricasso
    "Perpetuate" the weapon, but at most could discreetly put signs on the hinge.What happened to the duck sabers when the German fleet was dissolved in 1852? Prussia took over two ships
    ECKERNFÖRDE (ex GEFION) and BARBAROSSA from the German Confederation. With these ships are
    most likely duck sabers have also been adopted. In addition, bought the Prussian
    Ministry of the Navy later 832 duck sabers, which were stored in the federal fortress Mainz. It's like that
    assume that this was the entire remaining stock. In the mid-1950s, Prussia needed
    Century to equip his fleet duck sabers in large numbers. Because these are also inexpensive
    it would have made no sense to leave further stocks there. To
    Takeover of the duck sabers were marked with a "KM" under the stitch sheet
    Provided property mark of the Royal Navy. They also received a consecutive number.
    Officially for armament, they were issued on July 22, 1867 on the instructions of the Ministry of the Navy. That
    these weapons were only planned for the Navy for a limited time, it becomes clear that they are not in the
    Gun repair price list and thus included in the usual (spare parts) procurement path
    were.
    With A.K.O. from November 2, 1875, all duck sabers and cutlass in the now imperial navy were as a sidearm of the
    Crew of the ships decommissioned. They were no longer needed on modern armored ships. You saw boarding matches
    no more before. However, cutlass was still kept in stock for certain functions and occasions.
    (Uncrowned double eagle = acceptance and ownership stamp; S & K = manufacturer's stamp)
    Technical specifications:
    Overall length 820
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  2. #2
    more pic
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  3. #3
    Join Date
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    Edward: I am amused by the online translator you used ! "Duck Saber" (German Ente=Duck) The Germans call it a "Bordsäbel" or "Entermesser"

    Dale

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Kingston area, Ontario Canada
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    3,516
    Interesting cutlass but raises a question. ? The whole cutlas shows a good deal of past corrosion/pitting but the anchor and eagle engraving do not or is it the digital photos and lighting not showing this? I know photos can almost reverse the look of some details. Typically any depressions in a blade retain corrosion or as some call patina.

  5. #5
    Quote Originally Posted by Will Mathieson View Post
    Interesting cutlass but raises a question. ? The whole cutlas shows a good deal of past corrosion/pitting but the anchor and eagle engraving do not or is it the digital photos and lighting not showing this? I know photos can almost reverse the look of some details. Typically any depressions in a blade retain corrosion or as some call patina.
    Some photo shots with phone , some with digital camera
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    Last edited by edwardauskis; 05-21-2020 at 08:58 AM.

  6. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by Dale Martin View Post
    Edward: I am amused by the online translator you used ! "Duck Saber" (German Ente=Duck) The Germans call it a "Bordsäbel" or "Entermesser"

    Dale
    You right, in original is "Deutscher Entersäbel M 1849"

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