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Thread: Collins & Co Aguila sword

  1. #1

    Collins & Co Aguila sword

    Any thoughts on this? Could this been used in the Spanish/American war? Name:  Screenshot_20200729_204359.jpg
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  2. #2
    Name:  Screenshot_20200729_204339.jpg
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Size:  31.2 KBName:  Screenshot_20200729_204314.jpg
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  3. #3
    Join Date
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    That is time frame they were made but I am not well read on weapons used by service men at that time.
    The unlimited power of the sword is not in the hands of either the federal or state governments, but, where I trust in God it will ever remain, in the hands of the people." --- Tench Coxe

  4. #4
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    I "think" it is likely to be a private purchase item for a Spanish colonial officer. A sort of high class machete, but not for field work.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb 2002
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    Nipmuc USA
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    There is an article here

    https://www.oregonknifeclub.org/Newsletter%201204.pdf


    I am unable to remember where I read a more expansive history of these large eagles but it may simply have been copy from an auction or dealer listing.

    Cheers
    GC

  6. #6
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    Dec 2010
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    West Yorkshire, England.
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    Thank you for posting this very interesting and informative pdf.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Feb 2002
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    Madrid, Spain
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    Hello to all,

    This is a Spanish Infantry Officers' Machete, c. 1895. There is no regulation supporting its adoption, but nevertheless in this form (eagle-head hilt, made in German silver) was widely used among the officers serving in Cuba during the several wars held there since 1870, more or less, up to the final defeat at US hands.

    Most of them were made in Solingen or Remscheid, in Germany, but some of them came from the future enemy, as this one. It was a real combat weapon, adopted to match the machetes used by the Cuban rebel forces. The sword "for show" for such officers was a regular, lighter sabre (the M1887 pattern).

    Best,
    JJ
    SI, SI
    NO, NON

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    West Yorkshire, England.
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    Quote Originally Posted by David R View Post
    I "think" it is likely to be a private purchase item for a Spanish colonial officer. A sort of high class machete, but not for field work.
    ...As in not for cutting cane or brush, but was carried on the (battle)field.

  9. #9
    Thanks for good information.
    This is marked on the ricasso:
    COLLINS & CO.HARTFORD ACERO FINO CALIDAD GARANTIZADA NO.87, a hand with a hammer and the word "LEGITIMUS"

  10. #10
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