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Thread: Wilkinson P.A. Knife Pattern, what is this??

  1. #1
    Join Date
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    Wilkinson P.A. Knife Pattern, what is this??

    I have an interesting sword that was posted some time ago though I never followed up on what Wilkinsons meant by P.A. Knife Pattern.
    Does anyone know what P.A. Knife Pattern represents? two photos if the blade tip showing the 10 1/2" false edge that is not actually false.
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  2. #2
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    Stratford upon Avon UK
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    Can we see the whole sword please Will?

  3. #3
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    P.A. Boulton ? knife

    Private’s & ......Cavry (Cavalry)?

    C F Harper Esq

  4. #4
    Hi Will,

    I seem to recall exchanging notes with Robert Wilkinson Latham on this description, and as far as I can remember, "Prince Alfred"

  5. #5
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    Prince Alfred, interesting but does this refer to shape of the whole blade or just the tip? That the page also says knife one could assume the last 12 inches or less?
    The main fuller runs through the tip and the false edge angle matches the blade angle so it appears as a fullered spear point. The sword is a 4 bar patent hilt. The blade is light and straight. Grips similar to the n1853p troopers but smaller in size and without backing plates. The sword really has little in common with the 1853p and is made with a highly polished double fullered blade, light weight and leather lined scabbard, all traits of a fine officers sword.
    Though the proof page is written privates sword the sword is not a heavy troopers sword, very misleading.
    Was the swords point intentionally made to resemble a Japanese Yari spear?
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  6. #6
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    Hi Will, What are the words after 'privates' on the proof docket?

  7. #7
    James,

    It's abbreviated, but it says 3 barred Light Cavalry.

  8. #8
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    Thanks, so obvious now

  9. #9
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    Dec 2010
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    Quote Originally Posted by Will Mathieson View Post
    Prince Alfred, interesting but does this refer to shape of the whole blade or just the tip? That the page also says knife one could assume the last 12 inches or less?
    The main fuller runs through the tip and the false edge angle matches the blade angle so it appears as a fullered spear point. The sword is a 4 bar patent hilt. The blade is light and straight. Grips similar to the n1853p troopers but smaller in size and without backing plates. The sword really has little in common with the 1853p and is made with a highly polished double fullered blade, light weight and leather lined scabbard, all traits of a fine officers sword.
    Though the proof page is written privates sword the sword is not a heavy troopers sword, very misleading.
    Was the swords point intentionally made to resemble a Japanese Yari spear?
    Possibly means a "private order" especially as the correct term for a cavalry man is "trooper"1

  10. #10
    Hi Will,

    Just been trawling through my research correspondence for the past twelve years, and found the info that supports my recollection regarding the PA pattern.

    "The office of Ranger of Windsor Great Park was established to oversee the protection and maintenance of the Great Park at Windsor in the English county of Berkshire. The ranger has always been somebody close to the monarch."

    The PA Knife Pattern was a short sword made for Prince Alfred when held the Office of Ranger of Windsor Park 1841-61. Although the surviving information is minimal, the blade was recorded in a pencil notation as "25 inches single fuller".

    Based on my research and surviving archival notes, one must presume that the "knife pattern" referred to the point section of a blade, which was symmetrically shaped, double edged, with a central single fuller.

    Therefore, regardless of hilt type, and the cross-section of the blade at forte, the blade of a sword could still be made, whereby the point conformed to the PA pattern.

    The present day Ranger of Windsor Great Park is Prince Phillip, Duke of Edinburgh; an office he has held since 1952.

  11. #11
    Join Date
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    Thanks Gordon, I was sure it had something to do with the tips appearance. Using the PA notation in 1866 the year the sword was made it could be said the Prince Alfred sword was still fresh in the minds at Wilkinsons. Either that or looking through Wilkinson special order referencers that had these things notated. I would think such records would be useful to Wilkinsons when they were asked to make more of a particular pattern.

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