Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 25 of 36

Thread: Best Sword of 2021

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Kansas City Metro (USA)
    Posts
    1,756

    Best Sword of 2021

    Gents,

    It is that time again for you to show the best sword you picked up in 2021. It does not have to be the most expensive or most rare one but it should be the one you like the best.

    I will start off with the most complete sword I picked up this year making it my surprise (that is to say I was not looking for this specific sword) find.

    This is a WWI-WWII period Italian Naval Officer sword complete with hangers and knot. The straight sword has gilt brass fittings with nautical motifs of fouled anchors, rope knots, etc. The nickel plated flexible steel blade is etched with similar Navy motifs including ships and anchors. The black leather scabbard has gilt fittings and a stud, that along with a folding guard, locks the sword in the scabbard. The embroidered blue and gold wire straps make up the hangers that have gilt brass fittings and a regain chain and hook. The knot is gilt wire with blue highlights that has been on the sword for a very long time.

    I have been looking for an Italian knot like this but serendipity let me find this complete sword laying on a military show table.
    Attached Images Attached Images      
    "You can't please everyone, so you have to please yourself." Ricky Nelson

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Kingston area, Ontario Canada
    Posts
    3,792
    It is a close call between a RHG 1912p named officers swords and a general officers sword of an officer in the 9th Foot, Norfolk. Only because my interest in earlier history do I choose the general officers sword of Henry John Wilkinson who was also a ameteur artist and drew many sketches while in the Crimean War. Of course the brass scabbard and etched name, family crest and battle honours clinched it.
    Attached Images Attached Images    

  3. #3
    Not a sword but a couple of 18thC spontoons or I should say a spontoon and a halberd minus the axe type head although according to https://collections.royalarmouries.o...ect-33648.html a sergeants halberd minus the head is classed as a spontoon. The 'halberd' spontoon is 7ft 5 1/2 inches and the regular spontoon is 7ft 4 1/2 inches. You can see the slot where the head would have been and secured with a screw fitting on the spear head. The one that is a dedicated spontoon has a more substantial and robust socket as you can see from the photographs. These tend not to be that thick on the ground and many seem to have had bits lopped off the shaft for various reasons so I was quite glad to obtain these two intact albeit minus the axe head.
    The removable spear point has Roman numerals filed into the edge I would think to match an axe head stored or carried separately.
    Regards,
    Norman.
    Attached Images Attached Images        

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb 2002
    Location
    Nipmuc USA
    Posts
    12,264
    Perhaps my latest and favorite is a fish guard cuttoe. Outlined elsewhere.This short little guy should still be a keeper. The blade is only 15"/39.37 cm long. A whopping 22"/55.88 cm overall in length. Much as it is as it received, I have cleaned the brass enough to find that the fish actually has teeth!

    Merry Christmas
    GC
    Attached Images Attached Images              
    Last edited by Glen C.; 12-22-2021 at 09:31 AM.

  5. #5
    My best sword I picked up this year I posted about here back in late February. Mr. McCormick on your Spontoons I have the one in George Neumann's book Battle Weapons of the American Revolution page 378 55.PAA. The blade and beak are broken off. I purchased it from him at a show years ago before he past on. Now here is a question for you? I do have a complete English Halberd like the 2 on page 369. Been told the earlier models that the spear point does not screw out but is fixed. Only the later models does the spear head screw out. Your thoughts on that? Thanks

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    L'abbaye de Theleme
    Posts
    818
    This is not actually my best acquisition from 2021 nor my most expensive, but my most entertaining (i apologize for the poor pictures):

    Name:  1.jpg
Views: 404
Size:  50.2 KBName:  4b.jpg
Views: 403
Size:  36.4 KBName:  3.jpg
Views: 404
Size:  40.2 KBName:  2.jpg
Views: 397
Size:  30.9 KB

    Although dated in Toledo 1835, it could be asigned to the Light Cavalry officer model of 1840. It is broader than usual and a real fighting sword, heavy and quite sharp.
    The rare thing is that it has its owner´s name inscribed on the blade. This is very rare for Spanish swords and still more at that period.

    The name Amadeo de Mora (y Warnet) is easily researchable.

    Online I could find a dozen documents and even his Services Record.

    http://www.monacodebacardi.com/julio/site/doc10671.html


    He was an artillerist with superior formation. He finished the Napoleonic wars as an LtCol, and continued up to Brigadier. In 1836, as a Colonel, and one year after the date of this sword, he was involved directly in a combat against Carlist party units (one of many Spanish Civil wars in XIXth century). Maybe he even used the sword in anger.
    Last edited by Javier Ramos; 12-22-2021 at 04:37 AM.
    La vida amable, el enemigo hombre fuerte, ordinario el peligro, natural la defensa, la Ciencia para conseguirla infalible, su estudio forçoso, y el exercicio necessario conviene al que huviere de ser Diestro, no ignore la teorica, para que en la practica, el cuerpo, el braço, y los instrumentos obren lo conveniente a su perfeccion. --Don Luis Pacheco de Narvaez.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Kansas City Metro (USA)
    Posts
    1,756
    What neat finds so far. These are what I like to see. The favorite finds for whatever reason.

    I particularly like identified owner and researched swords myself. The history of the edged weapon can be as interesting as the material culture artifact itself.

    Keep 'em coming.
    "You can't please everyone, so you have to please yourself." Ricky Nelson

  8. #8
    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Joyce View Post
    My best sword I picked up this year I posted about here back in late February. Mr. McCormick on your Spontoons I have the one in George Neumann's book Battle Weapons of the American Revolution page 378 55.PAA. The blade and beak are broken off. I purchased it from him at a show years ago before he past on. Now here is a question for you? I do have a complete English Halberd like the 2 on page 369. Been told the earlier models that the spear point does not screw out but is fixed. Only the later models does the spear head screw out. Your thoughts on that? Thanks
    Hi Jim,
    I'm afraid I have no definitive answer with regard to your question. As you are probably aware information on these arms is rather thin on the ground. I have no reason to disbelieve the assertion that earlier types have fixed heads. The best resource to answer your question would probably be to e-mail the Royal Armouries as they have numerous examples and I have always found them to be helpful regarding this type of enquiry.
    My Regards,
    Norman.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Mar 2017
    Location
    Stockholm, Sweden
    Posts
    228
    This year I picked up an Austro-Hungarian Imperial and Royal (k.k.) cavalry sabre M1869 for officers. I generally prefer older swords but thought this is a must have for my collection. It’s nickel plated with scabbard. There’s a fuller down one side of the 83.5cm long blade with a false edge. The 2.8cm wide forte is marked ”L. Zeitler Wien VIII”. The symmetric hand guard (8.2cm wide at the grip) is decorated with floral openwork and the Habsburg double-headed eagle. The grip is covered in grey fish skin bound with silver wire. The pommel button is decorated with the owner’s monogram. I separately purchased an officer’s portepee which fits perfectly through the specially designed slits on the guard in front. For completion I fashioned a new washer from red felt material. I’m very pleased with it!
    Attached Images Attached Images     

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Location
    North West US
    Posts
    1,342

    Espada Ancha

    This espada ancha gets a top spot for me. Full length blade and most excellent hilt work.Name:  17795.jpg
Views: 399
Size:  94.4 KBName:  17794.jpg
Views: 394
Size:  96.8 KBName:  17794.jpg
Views: 394
Size:  96.8 KBName:  17792.jpg
Views: 389
Size:  92.4 KBName:  17790.jpg
Views: 390
Size:  96.3 KBName:  17788.jpg
Views: 391
Size:  97.1 KB
    Last edited by Eric Fairbanks; 12-22-2021 at 01:01 PM.
    The unlimited power of the sword is not in the hands of either the federal or state governments, but, where I trust in God it will ever remain, in the hands of the people." --- Tench Coxe

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Birmingham Alabama
    Posts
    1,705

    Prussian war booty French Mle AN XIII---AKA Mod 1815

    Guys: I believe I got this rat in '21, but I am not sure. It is a quite hard to find Palosch, Prussian issue, captured in 1815 from the French. It started as a Mle AN XIII, many of these were taken by the Prussians after Waterloo, and issued to the existing Kürrasier Regiments. In era of 1830 to 1835, they did a general rebuild of most of their edged weapons, especially the Blücher sabers and this model as well.

    This example still retains the original blade tip form. Supposedly, for Waterloo, the French pointed the tip of this style of weapon. This one missed the modification, indicating to me that it was taken from French stores, and not in battle. Hard to say now, but that is my opinion.

    In the 1830's general rebuild, the Prussians replaced the French grips with their own design, apparently they did not care for the original design with widely spaced wire and grooves. This one is one such example of that practice. It is also wrapped opposite of the French style, which is an indication of Prussian rebuild. These were issued to the line Kürrasier Regiments, and the many were stored for issue to Reserve and Landwehr heavy cavalry units later. This one is stamped with the marks of two such units, both of which are Landwehr heavy cavalry. The heavy cavalry Landwehr units were discontinued after 1871, making this one harder to find than the usual line regiments.

    Dale
    Attached Images Attached Images      

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Apr 2018
    Location
    Vladivostok, Russia
    Posts
    331
    This is perhaps the most interesting saber in my collection, thanks to the scabbard lettering I purchased in 2021.
    Attached Images Attached Images     

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    Northern England
    Posts
    420
    Half a dozen to to choose from so here's an 1822 Pillin Cavalry sabre with a nice unusual crest that's proving to be a bit elusive. Triple D or three stirrups?
    Attached Images Attached Images   

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Kansas City Metro (USA)
    Posts
    1,756
    Nice swords! 2021 has been good to you all.
    "You can't please everyone, so you have to please yourself." Ricky Nelson

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Nov 2015
    Location
    Near Cambridge UK
    Posts
    88
    Very pleased to obtain this nice light company officer's sabre based on the 1788 pattern, by Woolley & Co, 1790's. Wire bound ebony grip, feathered langets, lovely etched blade with maker's name.



    Name:  P1290801.jpg
Views: 372
Size:  98.6 KB

    Name:  P1290802.jpg
Views: 373
Size:  98.3 KB

    Name:  P1290710.jpg
Views: 370
Size:  98.6 KB

    Name:  P1290707.jpg
Views: 377
Size:  94.6 KB

  16. #16
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Kingston area, Ontario Canada
    Posts
    3,792
    Quote Originally Posted by Mel H View Post
    Half a dozen to to choose from so here's an 1822 Pillin Cavalry sabre with a nice unusual crest that's proving to be a bit elusive. Triple D or three stirrups?
    May be "D" for Duckett.

  17. #17
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Western Canada
    Posts
    319
    Quote Originally Posted by Mel H View Post
    Half a dozen to to choose from so here's an 1822 Pillin Cavalry sabre with a nice unusual crest that's proving to be a bit elusive. Triple D or three stirrups?
    I'd say that the plume of feathers on the torse is the actual crest, and the 3 "D's" or stirrups is separate but related to the crest above. Will could be on to something, but the Duckett crest has the feathers coming out of a coronet.

  18. #18
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Location
    North West US
    Posts
    1,342
    The 88 hussar hilt is a really attractive piece.
    The unlimited power of the sword is not in the hands of either the federal or state governments, but, where I trust in God it will ever remain, in the hands of the people." --- Tench Coxe

  19. #19
    Join Date
    Mar 2016
    Location
    ENGLAND
    Posts
    594
    Name:  IMG_20211224_173438.jpg
Views: 370
Size:  95.7 KB

    Covered in a recent post, but still beautiful. 1857 acanthus scroll Scottish field officer's sword.

    P. S. I wouldn't be at all displeased if there is a Woolley 1788 like the one above sheathed in my Christmas stocking tomorrow!
    Last edited by james.elstob; 12-24-2021 at 09:48 AM.

  20. #20
    Join Date
    Jul 2014
    Location
    Annandale, VA
    Posts
    947
    I obtained this apparently unique Marine sergeant’s hybrid sword, possibly a prototype, in July

    Name:  Ridabock Morphy 26.jpg
Views: 353
Size:  110.5 KBName:  Ridabock Morphy 23.jpg
Views: 345
Size:  101.5 KBName:  Ridabock Morphy 22.jpg
Views: 351
Size:  107.8 KB

    It is unique for two reasons:

    - It has no makers marks whatsoever. Virtually all Marine wide-blade M1859s are stamped or etched with the W. H. Horstmann name and Philadelphia address and, in most cases, with the king’s head stamp of the Solingen blade maker Weyersberg. Other than the absence of maker’s identification, the etching pattern is the same as found on typical Horstmann blades with the “U.S.M.C.” initials.

    - The second unique feature is that the hilt is a hybrid of the early Type One M1859 and the later Type Two, sometimes called the M1859/75 model.

    -- The Type One hilt, which is found on early Marine swords with plain unetched blades and blades with generic etching without “U.S.M.C.” initials, has the periphery of the pommel decorated with oak leaves; the guard has the space between the branches decorated by a pierced dense spray of foliage without rosettes; and the quillon face is decorated with a swirl design.


    Name:  Type 1 Hilt.jpg
Views: 351
Size:  95.2 KB

    -- The Type Two hilt, which is found on later Marine swords with etched blades with the initials “U.S.M.C.” included in the design, has the pommel decorated with Laurel leaves, the guard with rosettes among the foliage, and the quillon undecorated.

    Name:  Type 2 Hilt.jpg
Views: 348
Size:  90.0 KB

    I’m not quite certain what to make of this sword. It appears to be authentic and as originally made. If so, who made it, when, and for what purpose? I suspect it is a Horstmann or Horstmann/Weyersberg product. The etching is virtually identical to ones I have with named Horstmann blades. If not, it could have been made by Ames, Bent & Bush, Eggeling, or Ridabock, all of which had contracts to supply Marine sergeants’ swords. No examples showing their names, however, have ever been found on a Marine sergeant's sword. As for when, it was likely whenever the Marines first decided to use the initials “U.S.M.C.” on the blade. The conventional wisdom has been the initials were added in conjunction with the Uniform Regulation of 1875, but this is likely much too late. The Marines also changed the hilt design when they added the “U.S.M,C." to the etching. I have no idea why they wanted to change the design to use laurel leaves on the pommel and rosettes of the guard, but it might be because Ames and most other makers of the Army M1850 foot officers’ swords used those elements in their design.

    My guess is that this sword is probably a Horstmann sword produced under B&B contract as a prototype for a sword with new blade etching pattern and modified hilt decoration. If B&B was required to submit it to HQ USMC for approval, they might not have wanted it marked with Horstmann and/or Weyersberg markings. The guard decorations were apparently subsequently modified to add rosettes before being placed in full production. Unfortunately, I have absolutely no evidence to support my suppositions.
    Last edited by Richard Schenk; 12-25-2021 at 09:33 AM.

  21. #21
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    West Yorkshire, England.
    Posts
    384
    My own contribution has been posted in more detail elsewhere, but is the best military sword of the year for me. My personal favourite is the beleda belabang, a Borneo pirate sword which I will post elsewher.
    Attached Images Attached Images   
    Last edited by David R; 12-25-2021 at 06:25 AM.

  22. #22
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    1,164
    Wow! How long is the blade on the Espada Ancha?
    Tom Donoho

  23. #23
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Kansas City Metro (USA)
    Posts
    1,756
    Very nice swords that are being shown. It looks like 2021 was a good year for many of us. I always like finding something that I have been looking for. It seems the longer I have to look for a sword, the sweeter finally finding that sword seems to be.
    "You can't please everyone, so you have to please yourself." Ricky Nelson

  24. #24
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    L'abbaye de Theleme
    Posts
    818
    It is kind of weird that we have been getting swords as usual but we have written very little here. 2021 must be the poorest year in number of posts to date. Actually it happens in most forums I visit, not just this one.
    La vida amable, el enemigo hombre fuerte, ordinario el peligro, natural la defensa, la Ciencia para conseguirla infalible, su estudio forçoso, y el exercicio necessario conviene al que huviere de ser Diestro, no ignore la teorica, para que en la practica, el cuerpo, el braço, y los instrumentos obren lo conveniente a su perfeccion. --Don Luis Pacheco de Narvaez.

  25. #25
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Kingston area, Ontario Canada
    Posts
    3,792
    It seems FB forums for swords etc. are doing well and quicker to sell items. The different forums interlink with your messages.

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •