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Thread: A saber with an eagle's head on the hilt.

  1. #1
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    A saber with an eagle's head on the hilt.

    Hi all.
    I ask experts on the issue of sabers with an eagle's head on the hilt to speak out - I recently became the owner of this saber.
    I believe that this is the saber of a US militia officer of the early 19th century ....?
    When she came to me, I realized that the hilt was removed from the blade (I didnít manage to find out before the purchase), this is evidenced by a fresh rivet on the end of the hilt head and a new leather gasket under the hilt from the side of the blade.
    Also on the bow of the Blucher form there is a slot for attaching the knot.
    My questions about subjects:
    1) Is the hilt in native collection - is the shackle with a slot for a knot appropriate on a hilt with an eagle's head?
    2) Is the blade native to such a handle?
    Blade length 83 cm.
    The length of the saber with the handle is 96.5 cm.
    The width of the blade at the ricasso is 3.3 cm (33 mm.).
    On the first quarter of the hilt blade, a floral ornament is visible - traces of gilding in the pattern remain under the shield of the hilt handle.
    There are no manufacturer's marks.
    3) If the collection of the saber is original, then what kind of saber is it? For a cavalry officer or an artillery officer?

    Thanks in advance to everyone who has shown interest in my topic.
    Sincerely, Vladimir.
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  2. #2
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    More photo
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  3. #3
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    I would place it in the 1820s-1830s. Certainly, the majority of these were meant for the American market. The wire on the grip is a replacement and the plain ferrule (brass band on the grip) almost assures me it was a British produced sword. A slot in the guard for a sword knot is really common.

    It should display well.

    Cheers
    GC

  4. #4
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    Glen, thanks for your reply.
    Tell me what knots could be used with this saber in the USA at that time, if any.
    Sincerely, Vladimir.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Vladimir Sukhomlinov View Post
    Glen, thanks for your reply.
    Tell me what knots could be used with this saber in the USA at that time, if any.
    Sincerely, Vladimir.
    I honestly don't know but figure similar to British swords of the time.

  6. #6
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    I agree on British manufacturing even with langets the etch and furniture say British. Both England and Solingen made this style eaglehead and with 32.5 blade it is within mounted officer length. 1820 to 1830 Time frame with the low quality bone grip also fits. Nice piece Vlad.
    The unlimited power of the sword is not in the hands of either the federal or state governments, but, where I trust in God it will ever remain, in the hands of the people." --- Tench Coxe

  7. #7
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    Eric, thanks for your reply.
    Sincerely, Vladimir.

  8. #8
    The answers above are fine. It's a militia officer's sword, probably c1816/1825 but possibly earlier. It was made in Birmingham. The blade is appropriate to the hilt. The grips are bone rather than ivory suggesting it was not particularly expensive. Are their traces of silver wash? If so, it's an infantry officer's sword. Brass or gilt were designated for artillery. But...there appears to have been little or no enforcement of the regulations in militia service so it's impossible to say what branch it was used in. This is especially true of mounted units almost all of which were militia. The 1812 regulations are silent as to the proper color for dragoons but all the surviving evidence suggests it was silver.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by JV Puleo View Post
    The answers above are fine. It's a militia officer's sword, probably c1816/1825 but possibly earlier. It was made in Birmingham. The blade is appropriate to the hilt. The grips are bone rather than ivory suggesting it was not particularly expensive. Are their traces of silver wash? If so, it's an infantry officer's sword. Brass or gilt were designated for artillery. But...there appears to have been little or no enforcement of the regulations in militia service so it's impossible to say what branch it was used in. This is especially true of mounted units almost all of which were militia. The 1812 regulations are silent as to the proper color for dragoons but all the surviving evidence suggests it was silver.
    Thanks for the answer.
    I didn’t understand a bit - where should traces of silver be left, on the brass of the handle or on the bone?
    There are traces of gilding on the blade on the pattern.
    There are no traces of silver or gilding on the handle.
    Sincerely, Vladimir.

  10. #10
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    Vlad, the silver wash or gold glit would be on brass portions of hilt. It most likely would have been one or the other although there are some polished brass hilts most were washed ot gilded.
    The unlimited power of the sword is not in the hands of either the federal or state governments, but, where I trust in God it will ever remain, in the hands of the people." --- Tench Coxe

  11. #11
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    Eric, thanks for the reply, I got it.
    But, unfortunately, there are no remains of silvering or gilding on the handle - pure darkened brass. In some places there are green oxides.
    Sincerely, Vladimir.

  12. #12
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    When examining the handle with the help of magnifying glasses for jewelers, I found the remains of a silver coating on the inside of the eagle's beak - this means this saber of a cavalry officer?
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    Last edited by Vladimir Sukhomlinov; 09-15-2022 at 04:26 AM.

  13. #13
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    Infantry officer, certainly not artillery or mounted Artillery. I do not know the answer as far as Cavalry, Militia or State Cavalry. Most US trooper hilt furniture for early US Cavalry is iron with the exception of Ames m1833 and a few different types post and pre Revolutionary War. I would assume during early US Officers did as they wished as there were few regulations. It could be a tall infantry officer sword but not out of reason for mounted officer as many US infantry officers were mounted.
    The unlimited power of the sword is not in the hands of either the federal or state governments, but, where I trust in God it will ever remain, in the hands of the people." --- Tench Coxe

  14. #14
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    Eric, thanks for your reply.
    Sincerely, Vladimir.

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