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Thread: Cult of the Small-Sword

  1. #876
    What a lovely shape to the hilt. I really appreciate fully developed pas de ans. Tell me, are there any images of Hermes or a Caduceus? Both are important symbols in Alchemy. I have a sabre from the 1770's that has some alchemical and astrological symbols inscribed on the blade.
    Peace, Love, SWORDS!

  2. #877

    The alchemist's smallsword / 3

    Replies to:

    1.Mel H : Thank you very much.
    "Pactong"- this expression is quite new for mee.
    "It must have been strong and durable" - yes it is. I decomposed, clean and composed the sword by himself- but - the dragon head was bent at an ugly angle.
    I decided to turn to the craftsman and try to straighten it(with oxy-acetylene flame). He had a lot of hard work before he managed to break it !
    My error - NO craftsman at all !!!
    "Matthew Boulton" - WIKI: 1728 - 1809 England: was the son of a Birmingham manufacturer of small metal products. I estimated date of manufacture about 1750 ? - it respond (father or son ?)

    2.Morgan Butler : Thank you very much too.
    about "images" :
    = no Caduceus
    = on the bottom of crossguard are two small images. On right side is a man with the club Hercules ? - new foto, on left is a men completely unclear
    = grip : one side evidently Venus (seashell motif-new foto), the other side a seated woman - ???
    = shell guards :
    right : a woman with a small shield and a little something with wings - ???
    left : the gun, the capsized vessel, something big and the child with the little shield ??
    = bottom shell guards :
    right : the gun with women - goddess of war ? (Athena ?)
    left : a man with the spear and the shield - god of war ? (Ares ?)

    + 3 new fotos

    With happy New Year Viktor H.
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  3. #878
    Hello
    I have 3 lovely small sword exposed on my website http://swordscollection.blogspot.com...-xviii-th.html
    Let me know your thoughts
    Yves

  4. #879
    Funny enough i am always carefull when i clean them since the blades look still very deadly!!!but i love them

  5. #880
    Join Date
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    Yves,

    I saw your site the other day and book-marked it--what a coincidence! I am glad that you enjoy small-swords--they are special to me as well. You have a nice site!
    Tom Donoho

  6. #881
    I love small swords with the classic and functional "Pas de Ans". Lovely! I am enjoying your site!
    Peace, Love, SWORDS!

  7. #882
    it is said in fact " Pas-d'âne"....or donkey step translated which is the double bridge where you stick the thumb and index before the estoc or thrust.
    A pas d'âne is used in french sometimes to denominate a small bridge....
    Hope it helps
    http://swordscollection.blogspot.co.uk/

  8. #883
    I also heard/read that Pas d' ane" was a term applied to swords by collectors and not a period/historical term at all...but I'm glad to see your smallswords all have them!
    Peace, Love, SWORDS!

  9. #884
    It is right it is not a period or historical term...epee de court or court sword
    Cheers
    Yves

  10. #885
    Join Date
    May 2012
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    The East Texas Piney Woods
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    90

    A Few from My Collection

    Bonjour to all!

    I am new to the Forum, and thought I'd take this opportunity to "introduce" myself through this particular topic, one that's "near and dear" to me, speaking both literally ( since the attachment shows the scene above my computer as I write this ) and figuatively. The display in the ( admittedly poor ) photo is one I made some twenty-plus years ago using a semicurcular panel constructed by my sword-collecting mentor, the late Robert Justice of Dallas, Tex., to hold his fine grouping of shamshirs ( scimitars ). When he was forced by circumstances to sell off his collection, I came into ownership of the board and proceeded to fill it with French epees; of course this photo also serves as the basis for my avatar! When I eventually get a camera of greater quality I plan on photographing them individually including close-ups of the hilts, but for now a look at the collection as a whole will have to suffice.

    Flanking the display board are French officer and enlisted short sabres of the Revolution ( left ) and 1er Empire ( right ). Chronologically the epees read right-to-left, beginning with an unmarked-but- likely French gilt chiseled-iron hilt civillian-style with a very short triangular blade Next are two examples from the French Revolution, whose design suggests even earlier, except for thier "Liberty cap" pommels! Four Revolutionary, Consular, or Imperial "foot officer" types are next. In the center are the favorites of the collection, a heavily gilt M. An XII epee of an officer of the Imperial general staff and a blued-and-gilt bladed regulation epee of a French Imperial Brigadier General, followed by two more from the Restoration and Second Empire ( with the dark-tarnished sword knot ). Another knotted Louis Phillipe era officer's epee and a cheap musician's sword are followed by four gilded triangular-bladed epees, no doubt intended as true "court swords".

    I hope you enjoy looking!
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  11. #886
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    Welcome, James--and thanks for sharing.
    Tom Donoho

  12. #887
    Join Date
    Dec 2001
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    Indeed, welcome aboard, James. Nice selection, and well presented too!
    mark@swordforum.com

    ~ Hostem Hastarum Cuspidibus Salutemus ~

    "Those who beat their swords into plowshares usually end up plowing for those who don't."
    Benjamin Franklin

  13. #888
    Join Date
    May 2012
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    Any Thoughts on this Smallsword?

    I originally posted this in the general section where I mistakenly thought it would get some kind of response; though there have been over 70 views there has yet to be a single comment, so I'll also put it here "where it belongs"! This is the probable civillian/gentleman's smallsword seen at the right of my collection pictured above. I've had this now for many years, too many to remember when I got it, but it was at a Dallas, Tex. gunshow from someone just wandering around with it so I have NO idea of its history. I was intrigued by its now somewhat faded artistry; if I remember right, this is what the French called an epee de ciselure, "carved" or "chisel-hilt" indicating its decoration being carved into the iron hilt. As you can see, it was then gilded, presumably with gold foil worked into the relief areas. I don't know if the higher parts of the hilt were originally polished, browned, or blued, but now ( contrary to how it looks under the flash ) it's the even smooth brown of old patinated iron. Unfortunately at some time it lost one of its Turks heads, but otherwise the silver wire wrap is very nice.
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  14. #889
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    The blade is more of a problem, though maybe not for a piece of this age. It MAY have been shortened, as the taper seems abrupt - the blade length's only 27 3/4"; the entire length overall is 33 3/4". It's rough and somewhat erose with no markings or evidence of bluing or gilding, but the generic floral scroll engraving is evident though worn. I've always thought this was either French or English, from around the mid-1700's but if anyone has ANY ideas, especially more specific to place, time, or details of manufacture, please let me know!
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  15. #890
    Quote Originally Posted by James Neel View Post
    The blade is more of a problem, though maybe not for a piece of this age. It MAY have been shortened, as the taper seems abrupt - the blade length's only 27 3/4"; the entire length overall is 33 3/4". It's rough and somewhat erose with no markings or evidence of bluing or gilding, but the generic floral scroll engraving is evident though worn. I've always thought this was either French or English, from around the mid-1700's but if anyone has ANY ideas, especially more specific to place, time, or details of manufacture, please let me know!
    1740s-50's I'll wager. It still has functional pas de' annes.....
    Peace, Love, SWORDS!

  16. #891
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    Northern England
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    405
    It's a good while since I saw any movement over here in what I'll describe as the Gentlemens parlour ( Ladies not excluded ), so I thought it a good time add a couple of pictures of my latest aquisition. It has a rather nice, pierced silver hilt, broad hollow ground blade with no marks or engraving and still has its scabbard (missing its original bottom mount). The hilt has no hallmarks so tying it down to a specific country is a little difficult, I'm leaning towards the Netherlands because I have a steel hilted one with a Dutch name, that has a similar basket work design. I'm pleased to have it, it's in nice crisp condition, there's a small fault with the bottom turkshead but I can live with that. Any thoughts would be welcome.
    Mel.
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  17. #892
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    NJ
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    284

    Talking

    In the words of Indianna Jones, "It belongs in a museum!"

    That's a very serious smallsword you have there. Quite unique and beautiful! Congratulations! Did you purchase it at an an auction?

  18. #893
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    Very nice, Mel. It's really hard to pinpoint these swords even with hallmarks because that only tells us where it was manufactured, it doesn't tell us where it ended its journey and went into service. Yo do have a nice lattice pattern that is attractive. Wold you please post some pics of the blade?

    Enjoy!
    Tom Donoho

  19. #894
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    Thanks for the comments, some pics of the thirty inch blade attached.
    Mel.
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  20. #895
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    Thanks, Mel--now we have a better appreciation of this sword. Enjoy!
    Tom Donoho

  21. #896
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    Aug 2008
    Location
    Northern England
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    405

    when is a smallsword not a small sword?

    As per the title.
    I've attached a couple of pictures of a fairly early sword that I've had for quite a long time and would be interested to hear some thoughts, I've never been sure if it would be described as a smallsword or something a little more transitional. The blade is typical triangular of heavy construction, 31 inches long.
    Mel.
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  22. #897
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    Another photo to give a sense of scale.
    Mel.
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  23. #898
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    Hi, Mel.

    I consider it a hefty small-sword.
    Tom Donoho

  24. #899
    That is a very nice Military Officers sword! It has the Epee du Soldat appearance. Smallsword design but really for military/field applications that an officer and a gentleman might require. I have heard that kind of blade called an "Espadon". It seems to be a hollowground at the forte and then goes out into a double edged blade. Super nice!
    Peace, Love, SWORDS!

  25. #900
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    Northern England
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    Thanks for the comments, I always thought it more suited to miltary use than a gentlemans walking out sword, Hefty small-sword, sums it up nicely.
    Mel.

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