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Thread: Fully finished and hilted swords from Neil Burridge!

  1. #1

    Fully finished and hilted swords from Neil Burridge!

    Neil has just placed a big update of his sword page!

    http://www.templeresearch.eclipse.co...s_for_sale.htm

    Gundlingen sword: the photo of the original has been replaced with his cast.

    Antenna hilted sword has been added! It was there for sale, but now the photo of the finished item has been added! It looks absolutely stunning!

    Now if you scroll down further, you'll see that Neil now also sells completely hilted EP and Gundlingen swords. I don't agree with the hilt on the Gundlingen sword, but I'll discuss that with him. Anyway, for those who want a sword without any work to do on them, now is your chance to own one of Neil's swords. And very attractively priced as well

  2. #2
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    Wow! Especially that Antenna sword looks amazing...



    Close up:
    http://www.templeresearch.eclipse.co...tham_large.jpg
    Hwæğere şær fuse feorran cwoman
    to şam æğelinge. - Dream of the Rood


    "Ah, Blackadder. Started talking to yourself, I see."
    "Yes...it's the only way I can be assured of intelligent conversation."
    - Lord Melchett and Lord Edmund Blackadder

  3. #3
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    Sweeeeet...

    They should call that one the Owl Sword... look at its eyes...

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    HURRAY!

    ...and I just ordered something else so now I have to wait until I have money again.

    But at least it's there, so now it's a matter of time before I have one as well!
    Great news! Will Neil sell scabbards as well?

  5. #5
    Originally posted by Frank Smaling
    HURRAY!

    ...and I just ordered something else so now I have to wait until I have money again.

    But at least it's there, so now it's a matter of time before I have one as well!
    Great news! Will Neil sell scabbards as well?
    Not yet, but you could ask. He could make bare wooden scabbards, but if you want fur lined, hazel stiffened, leather covered scabbards with bronze chapes, then he'll probably have to pass

  6. #6
    BOING. Yeah, wow, those are super. What would you do differently on that Gundlingen hilt, Jeroen? I don't know the type very well.

    Hmm, an antenna-hilt, hmmm.....


    Matthew

  7. #7
    I'm using the hilt as shown below. This is a Mindelheim type sword, but a Gundlingen sword has been found with the same pommel. Also note that the lowest part of the hilt plates, the edge doesn't line up with the edge of the blade. This is the case on all Gundlingen and Mindelheim swords I've seen.
    Attached Images Attached Images  

  8. #8
    An alternative is the one below, which is a wooden sword from Ireland (?). It looks basically like a dome shaped pommel with the top flattened. The same thing applies to the hilt plates on this one.
    Attached Images Attached Images  

  9. #9
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    I can see I'm going to have to do more business with Neil very soon!
    "Courage is fear holding on a minute longer."--Gen. George S. Patton

  10. #10
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    Oh goodie!!!!

    More stuff to spend money on!!!



    I was waiting for something like this, since I'm totally "unhandy"...
    David K. Wilson, Jr., Laird of Glencoe
    The best laid schemes o' mice an' men, gang aft agley... -- Robert Burns

    See, it is I who created the blacksmith
    who fans the coals into flame
    and forges a weapon fit for its work.

    -- Isaiah 54:16

  11. #11
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    Not yet, but you could ask. He could make bare wooden scabbards, but if you want fur lined, hazel stiffened, leather covered scabbards with bronze chapes, then he'll probably have to pass
    Then you may ask S. Jaroschinski from www.noricum.de - or better me! Stefan can´t speak english!

  12. #12
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    A pic from the noricum website:


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    That´s the "sword of Hammer" (Hammer is a very little village near Nürnberg, bavaria).

    A mycenaen sword (i think the only) of this style in middle europe.

    Here´s an pic of an hallstatt-scabbard:



    Linnen-wrapped (clued) wood with bronze chape ("Flügelortband").

    I own an hallstattsword (type "Mindelheim") and i try to reconstruct the fighting method (better: possibilities) with it.

    The sword in the right, the scabbard in the left hand as blocking "weapon" is good to handle. The "wings" of the chape can penetrate hard wood (and bone cranium).

    My girlfriend means, it looks like the "sword dancers" on the bronze-couch of the Hochdorf-Chieftain:

    Last edited by Steve L.; 04-17-2006 at 12:44 PM.

  14. #14
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    Steve, that is an interesting suggestion about the scabbards and chapes. In Ireland the winged chapes have a single tiny rivet hole and are usually said to be a very weak attachment, but without reconstruction and experimenting that is a bit tenuous. With your replica, is there a strong riveting device holding it on or is there some other technique which locks it in place firmly?

    B.
    "If your bayonet breaks, strike with the stock; if the stock gives way, hit with your fists; if your fists are hurt, bite with your teeth" (Dragomiroff, c.1890)

  15. #15
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    Very interesting indeed Steve!

    Do you have a close up of the couch?
    Hwæğere şær fuse feorran cwoman
    to şam æğelinge. - Dream of the Rood


    "Ah, Blackadder. Started talking to yourself, I see."
    "Yes...it's the only way I can be assured of intelligent conversation."
    - Lord Melchett and Lord Edmund Blackadder

  16. #16

  17. #17
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    With your replica, is there a strong riveting device holding it on or is there some other technique which locks it in place firmly?
    On my "Mindelheim"-replica the chape is fixed with an bronze rivet. There is o n e find of an bronzeriveted chape in the graves of Hallstatt, Austria! And "one find is no find"!

    I´ve buyed this replica second-hand. Maybe i´ll replace the bronze rivet with one of antler. (Wood is too weak!)

    The winged-style hallstatt-chapes have "ancestors in shape" (sorry for this metapher, i don´t no the english word for this):

    Middle-bronzeage-mace (sacrifical tools):



    This is the "Zinken (Hook) of Welbsleben" (thuringia, east germany) - maybe an highpriest- or highking-insignia. Ideal for immolation. (Was in fact common in BA and in early IA! There are finds in an cave in slovenia of easthallstattculture, with bones of cows, goats, humans (children), dogs,...)

    The hallstatt-chapes looks like an "remake" or "sign of past times" or maybe "priest-king-insigna" of former eras. In graves of the late hallstattculture are a big number of pieces from earlier times. (In Austria it was an bronze sword of westhallstattculture provenience of 900 BC in an grave of an easthallstattculture "King" of 600 BC! The guideweapon of easthallstattculture wasn´t the sword - it was an tomahawk-like battle-axe!)

    Note this couch:

    Late hallstattculture (600-500 BC). Decorated with sword-bearing "dancers"/ "warriors". In this time the sword was n o t in use - the weapon of the noble was an dagger! (That becames longer and longer to the latène-periods!)

    I think, that some of the "big (wo)men" of the halltstattcultures was "nostalgiques":

    They´ve used equipment with decorations of "the good old time"!

    The time, where the "big (wo)men" hold the power to take lives for the gods in their hands?

    Very interesting indeed Steve!
    Do you have a close up of the couch?
    http://www.wcurrlin.de/links/basiswi...ne-2048pix.jpg

    That´s the biggest pic of the couche i´ve found.

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    Thanks for the pics Steve and Jeroen.

    To me, it seems that the fighters are using small shields or bucklers. Also the circles on the bottom right here:
    http://www3.iath.virginia.edu/Barbar...pgs/Scan39.jpg
    look a lot like a bronze age shield.

    Steve, I think the "ancestors in shape" is a very interesting and convincing theory. I find especially the depiction of leaf bladed swords very interesting, as well as the circles mentioned above.
    Hwæğere şær fuse feorran cwoman
    to şam æğelinge. - Dream of the Rood


    "Ah, Blackadder. Started talking to yourself, I see."
    "Yes...it's the only way I can be assured of intelligent conversation."
    - Lord Melchett and Lord Edmund Blackadder

  19. #19
    Originally posted by Paul Hansen
    Thanks for the pics Steve and Jeroen.

    To me, it seems that the fighters are using small shields or bucklers.
    I don't think the images represent combat, but rather a dance. What they are holding in the other hand can be something entirely different. A lot of the Hallstatt situlae show a dance of men around a helmet or a drinking vessel (see this example), holding something that looks like a grip with a ball shaped end on either side. It could be something similar depicted on the couch. The couch is of a slighly later date, and different place though.

  20. #20
    Speaking of situlae, the situla from Kuffarn finally gave me answer as to whether hallstatt swords would have been used from horseback (see top right corner). Also check out those cool hats! I've got to get me one of those horsemens hats!
    Attached Images Attached Images  

  21. #21
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    Perhaps dancing and fighting were related?

    Tacitus' Germania mentions this:
    One and the same kind of spectacle is always exhibited at every gathering. Naked youths who practise the sport bound in the dance amid swords and lances that threaten their lives. Experience gives them skill and skill again gives grace; profit or pay are out of the question; however reckless their pastime, its reward is the pleasure of the spectators.
    http://www.fordham.edu/halsall/source/tacitus1.html
    As an interesting aside, this is similar to Indonesian practices where combat arts demonstrations are given at festivals, but usually only in dance form.

    Originally posted by Jeroen Zuiderwijk
    Also check out those cool hats! I've got to get me one of those horsemens hats!
    Pff, you'll look like kabouter Plop!
    Last edited by Paul Hansen; 04-20-2006 at 04:54 AM.
    Hwæğere şær fuse feorran cwoman
    to şam æğelinge. - Dream of the Rood


    "Ah, Blackadder. Started talking to yourself, I see."
    "Yes...it's the only way I can be assured of intelligent conversation."
    - Lord Melchett and Lord Edmund Blackadder

  22. #22
    Originally posted by Paul Hansen
    Perhaps dancing and fighting were related?

    Tacitus' Germania mentions this:


    As an interesting aside, this is similar to Indonesian practices where combat arts demonstrations are given at festivals, but usually only in dance form.
    Quite possible.

    Pff, you'll look like kabouter Plop!
    I was thinking Urbanus I already have my smurf hat as part of my Hallstatt outfit. The more silly hats, the better

  23. #23
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    To me, it seems that the fighters are using small shields or bucklers. Also the circles on the bottom right here: :
    Shields of early hallstattculture has other - not round and "buckler"- shape: they was long-oval, sometimes with spinna, sometimes with round boss, sometimes without an special armoured handguard.

    I find especially the depiction of leaf bladed swords very interesting, as well as the circles mentioned above.
    I think, that are pics of "Gündlingen"- or "Mindelheim"-type.

    The "tools" in the non-sword-hand are maybe the scabbards with the leaping balteus - note the parallel lines at the forearms. I´ve tried it and it works: using the scabbard as blocking weapon is comfortable and the balteus works like an whip (ideal for hits to the face )!

    But that´s only my idea!

    I´ve found out (for myself and non-academic), that the "Gündlingen"- or "Mindelheim"-swords not "accept" an shield by their side! It´s not an middle-age fighting-style with them - it´s more like escrima! The blades are only (!) for cut (the edges are carved like an sarbre), stroking is only from a higher position (horse, chariots was unusual in early IA in middle europe) possible.

    On foot is an light defence waepon sometimes necessary. Maybe a mace or clubb, a short staff (this "tools" look like an double-barred tonfa) - or the scabbard!

    Maybe the swordfight in the hallstattculture was ritualised!? Like an "wardance"!?

    A lot of the Hallstatt situlae show a dance of men around a helmet or a drinking vessel (see this example), holding something that looks like a grip with a ball shaped end on either side.
    That are boxers, Jeroen! Maybe in a ritualised fight. Some "fighter" wear an "armband" (by the majority) on the left - the shieldarm! They are nude, but wearing a belt: Maybe the targetzone?

  24. #24
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    Originally posted by Steve L.
    Shields of early hallstattculture has other - not round and "buckler"- shape: they was long-oval, sometimes with spinna, sometimes with round boss, sometimes without an special armoured handguard.
    If these pictures depict LBA combat, than perhaps they would also use LBA shields.

    Originally posted by Steve L.
    The "tools" in the non-sword-hand are maybe the scabbards with the leaping balteus - note the parallel lines at the forearms. I´ve tried it and it works: using the scabbard as blocking weapon is comfortable and the balteus works like an whip (ideal for hits to the face )!

    But that´s only my idea!
    Could you perhaps post some pictures of how you do it? Or even better a short video?

    Originally posted by Steve L.
    I´ve found out (for myself and non-academic), that the "Gündlingen"- or "Mindelheim"-swords not "accept" an shield by their side! It´s not an middle-age fighting-style with them - it´s more like escrima! The blades are only (!) for cut (the edges are carved like an sarbre), stroking is only from a higher position (horse, chariots was unusual in early IA in middle europe) possible.
    I personally like my Ewart Park for Pencak Silat forms practice. Even without hilt.

    However, I disagree with the cutting-only comment. My EP at least is very well suited for thrusting as well as for making quick "whip" attacks. It's very versatile.

    I also disagree with your (implied) statement that shields always make combat slow. For instance, this gatka clip was posted by Mike Stillwell:
    http://video.google.com/videoplay?do...481787&q=gatka
    http://forums.swordforum.com/showthr...threadid=61289
    Sword and buckler can be *very* dynamic!

    Especially with leather LBA shields/bucklers, which I think are an excellent match for a EP type weapon. I need to reconstruct one of those soon...
    Hwæğere şær fuse feorran cwoman
    to şam æğelinge. - Dream of the Rood


    "Ah, Blackadder. Started talking to yourself, I see."
    "Yes...it's the only way I can be assured of intelligent conversation."
    - Lord Melchett and Lord Edmund Blackadder

  25. #25
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    Sword and buckler can be *very* dynamic!
    Paul, i speak about early IA swordfighting techniques with long swords like the "Gündlingen"- or "Mindelheim"-type! Long swords without sharp point and carved edges. With an very widespreaded pommel (that cut in the wrist, when you swing a "Mindelheim"- sword like this gatka-sarbres)!

    Believe me: It´s a close-combat-weapon, for cutting!

    But, i agree with you:

    The EP is an LBA-sword with an broad leafblade and an point, without an big pommel. The LBA-shields ("Buckler") are small and for a very quick (and nasty) style of fight!

    Could you perhaps post some pictures of how you do it? Or even better a short video?
    Not this and not the next week - but then...

    If these pictures depict LBA combat, than perhaps they would also use LBA shields.
    IF, Paul! IF!

    I think, the decoration of the Hochdorf-couch (late hallstatt) depicts early hallstattculture typology, not LBA!

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