Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 26 to 41 of 41

Thread: A *BIG* thumbs up to the DF Daimyo folded blade

  1. #26
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Järvenpää, Finland
    Posts
    3,241
    Aaron, you haven't polished the Orchid blade by any chance, have you?
    Certified nerd; if you need an Excel sheet or an AutoCAD drawing done, just drop me a PM!

  2. #27
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    Maryland (metro D.C.)
    Posts
    6,708
    I think production kats, at the level they're at today, offer decent value. Old-school Japanese blades tend to be too heavy on niku for most people anyway, and modern producers are putting out a lot of variety, as compared to just a few years ago.

  3. #28
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    An Englishman abroad
    Posts
    3,273
    Quote Originally Posted by Ty N. View Post
    I think production kats, at the level they're at today, offer decent value. Old-school Japanese blades tend to be too heavy on niku for most people anyway, and modern producers are putting out a lot of variety, as compared to just a few years ago.
    Surely if it's made in the correct style, the Niku is appropriate? What could be too much Niku?
    Bartender and Brewmeister for the Pub


    Stranger in a Strange land

  4. #29
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Järvenpää, Finland
    Posts
    3,241
    Quote Originally Posted by Mat Rous View Post
    Surely if it's made in the correct style, the Niku is appropriate? What could be too much Niku?
    Not if it's a tatami-cutter. If you mean traditional as in "armour-cutter" then more niku is good. But for cutting softer targets, niku is not necessary.
    Certified nerd; if you need an Excel sheet or an AutoCAD drawing done, just drop me a PM!

  5. #30
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Grenoble, France
    Posts
    713
    That's what I'm complaining about. The katana is supposed to be a flesh and bone cutter, not a tatami cutter. I can understand people who do competition tameshigiri to try to get a blade as flat as possible. For the others, a cheese slicer katana is more like cheating themselves. But I think the manufacturers adopted "performance" or "competition" geometry because it has a nice "buzz" for beginners, because it cuts well (only tatami, but who cares) and the geometry is much easier and cheaper to obtain. The proportion of flat blades and blades with niku is something like 3 to 1 at least, in production katana. While blades with no niku existed in the past, I would bet that the proportion was pretty much the contrary, or even lower. But hey, production katana are for the masses and masses don't care much about niku...
    Last edited by Bogdan M.; 07-09-2007 at 07:38 AM.
    Against ignorance, gods themselves struggle in vain.

  6. #31
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    An Englishman abroad
    Posts
    3,273
    Quote Originally Posted by Timo Qvintus View Post
    Not if it's a tatami-cutter. If you mean traditional as in "armour-cutter" then more niku is good. But for cutting softer targets, niku is not necessary.

    Japanese Blades were never designed to "Cut Tatami", designing competion blades is a modern thing. Hira Zhukuri blades existed but they weren't designed for that! Besides which, you don't aim for the Armour!
    Last edited by Mat Rous; 07-10-2007 at 06:34 AM.
    Bartender and Brewmeister for the Pub


    Stranger in a Strange land

  7. #32
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Järvenpää, Finland
    Posts
    3,241
    ..shouldn't post before I think.. AFAIK tatami-cutters would cut meat as well (not bone, though).
    Certified nerd; if you need an Excel sheet or an AutoCAD drawing done, just drop me a PM!

  8. #33
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Grenoble, France
    Posts
    713
    Quote Originally Posted by Timo Qvintus View Post
    ..shouldn't post before I think.. AFAIK tatami-cutters would cut meat as well (not bone, though).
    Most probably, and I think we all understand eachother here.

    I guess the evolution of the common target type dictates the evolution of the sword.
    Koto era swords were very flexible, they needed to survive the contact with heavvy armored targets (they didn't aim for the armour, of course but $..t happens in battle ).
    Later on, katana became an infantry sword, armor got lighter, so katana became shorter, harder and less flexible. Then it turned from a battle weapon into a weapon used for duels or self defense (peace sucks, heh? ).
    Then tatami cutting was introduced as a means of apreciating the skill of the swordsman and the quality of the sword. Today katanas are mostly used for tatami cutting, or similar targets, which means tatami tranformed from means for testing of katanas into the purpose of katanas. I agree, this makes niku rather pointless. You end up with thin and wide blades like most of the hanwei new gen. As these blades will perform better than the traditional ones for this purpose, they will be chosen by evolution, because the type of targets is the evolutionary (selection) criterion.

    So unless a new trend imposes some targets closer to the traditional ones, i guess traditional geometry blades will disappear from mass production.
    Sorry for the hijack and end of my offtopic rant...
    Last edited by Bogdan M.; 07-10-2007 at 08:21 AM.
    Against ignorance, gods themselves struggle in vain.

  9. #34

    Besides...

    Quote Originally Posted by Aaron Justice View Post
    C'mon, give it a while at least! The Bugei blade I mounted in December didn't go until July almost... My Kami I had over a year.

    Also, I am running out of blades. I have this, an Orchid, a PK I am getting from Michael, and a Sorrells blade that isn't finished yet. That's it! Selling pieces now would be like selling off a piece of my body... do look further into that...

    ...as a "weekender" who is running a side business Aaron is already at the limit for the number of swords, etc. he can sell on the non-business classifieds. He, and another few, have overrun the 1-2 per month limit and will either be reined in or made to use the business classifieds.

    If he DOES eventually choose to sell the sword then this is a great ad and test of market interest.
    Last edited by Alexander Chin; 07-11-2007 at 09:41 AM.
    Euthenist, Exorcist, Utilitarianist

  10. #35
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    north east England
    Posts
    3,052

    Grateful for Aaron

    I am grateful for Aarons presence on SFI - the amount of production sword remounts he has influenced is staggering if you look back over the last few years or ran a poll

    Back on topic - or is it off topic ?? anyway for me the katana edge is a trade off
    between a profile with niku for edge support and a flat meat'less' profile - sharp as hell but prone to chipping ( ? )
    anyway you dont need a half assed niku lesson from me - read keith larmans excellent article - sword blade niku , at rich steins site , that article is priceless

    The legions of mat cutters wont care a jot about niku especially the newer guys I mean - they favour their wide as hell PK XL 's and cheness SGC's - niku is a moot point for them as it does not aid laser edge sharpness for mat cutting -

    although the may see their folly when they try cutting something a bit more resiliant than cheap goza .

    sadly I dread a time when people coming through think the katana has to be
    like nearly 4 cm wide and paper thin - theres so much more variety and purpose to the japanese sword than just "cutting stuff "

    Mick

    ( a recovering back yard cutter )
    Last edited by michael wilson; 07-12-2007 at 12:48 AM.
    " Put on the full armor of God so that you can take your stand against the devil's schemes. For our struggle is not against flesh and blood, but against principalities, against the authorities, against the powers of this dark world and against the spiritual forces of evil in the heavenly realms."



    Ephesians 6:11

  11. #36
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    Sacramento, CA
    Posts
    1,141

    Huanuo

    Fred Chen and Huanuo sword has come a long way, in my opinion.
    http://www.huanuosword.com
    Dynasty Forge seems to be the less expensive distributor.

  12. #37
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Grenoble, France
    Posts
    713
    Quote Originally Posted by max roberson View Post
    Fred Chen and Huanuo sword has come a long way, in my opinion.
    http://www.huanuosword.com
    Dynasty Forge seems to be the less expensive distributor.
    Not really. I think Oni forge and LL have/had even more affordable prices.

    And that huanou site is awful, it's slow, not structured and has very scarce info. It is possible to gather info on their products by visiting their retailers only...
    Against ignorance, gods themselves struggle in vain.

  13. #38
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    Costa Mesa, CA
    Posts
    8,650
    By the way, i am going to try to get some hi res and well lit photos of the blade so you guys can see some of the activity better. These shots provide the impression of low layer forging when actually it seems like it has a decently high level of layers, just with some visible layers being a bit wider than the others.
    Every time I put on a suit for a wedding or other event, I feel like I'm wearing optimal clothing for an epic fight scene...

    Ronin Outpost

  14. #39
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    Costa Mesa, CA
    Posts
    8,650
    Quote Originally Posted by Timo Qvintus View Post
    Aaron, you haven't polished the Orchid blade by any chance, have you?
    Actually, I have. It looks better, but I'm surprised that the habuchi didn't show up more than it does. Usually Paul Chen blades when they are repolished show a great deal more detail. This one didn't for some reason. But the blade a bit more muted in the hada and slightly more defined in the hamon.
    Every time I put on a suit for a wedding or other event, I feel like I'm wearing optimal clothing for an epic fight scene...

    Ronin Outpost

  15. #40
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Järvenpää, Finland
    Posts
    3,241
    Quote Originally Posted by Aaron Justice View Post
    Actually, I have. It looks better, but I'm surprised that the habuchi didn't show up more than it does. Usually Paul Chen blades when they are repolished show a great deal more detail. This one didn't for some reason. But the blade a bit more muted in the hada and slightly more defined in the hamon.
    Have you posted that somewhere? We want pics!!!
    Certified nerd; if you need an Excel sheet or an AutoCAD drawing done, just drop me a PM!

  16. #41
    By the way, i am going to try to get some hi res and well lit photos of the blade so you guys can see some of the activity better. These shots provide the impression of low layer forging when actually it seems like it has a decently high level of layers, just with some visible layers being a bit wider than the others.
    Please use either thumbnails or links when doing posting the images.
    Euthenist, Exorcist, Utilitarianist

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •