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Thread: Anyone know what this is?

  1. #1
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    Anyone know what this is?

    Hello all!!!
    I picked this up yesterday because it appears to originally have been well made and was interesting . It is about 24 inches / 60 cm long with traces of silver kofgari on the grip and a "cartouche" also of silver kofgari on the base of the blade. The blade also appears to have had some sort of decoration/ writing (koranic inscription?) in relief all along the blade itself. The scabbard looks afghani. Any ideas? All help is greatly appreciated!!!!
    All the best,
    Ann
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    Dr. Ann

  2. #2
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    Hello Dr. Feuerbach,
    This looks like a Persian Qajar qama. That would date it as 19th century I think.

    Regards,
    Emanuel
    Always check your assumptions...there are no contradictions.
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  3. #3
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    Thanks Emanual,
    I was thinking along those lines but all the ones I have seen have been straight blades. I have seen a similar grip but not a similar blade.
    Dr. Ann

  4. #4
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    Hello Dr. Feuerbach,

    The blade type closest to this is that of a khanjar, also Qajar period: http://www.oriental-arms.com/item.php?id=1498 What I find odd about this qama is that the waves on the blade are symmetrical and the incisions at the tip are not conductive to thrusting. It's an odd piece, and I wonder if Manouchehr can tell us something about it.

    Emanuel
    Last edited by Emanuel Nicolescu; 07-02-2007 at 01:18 PM.
    Always check your assumptions...there are no contradictions.
    Get some real news...
    www.informationclearinghouse.info
    www.counterpunch.org
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  5. #5
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    Thanks Emanuel, I had looked at Artzi site but did not see that one. I found this link too, which has a very similar grip.
    http://therionarms.com/antiques/ttoy387.html
    and...call me Ann or Dr. Ann as my students call me!
    Dr. Ann

  6. #6
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    Hello Dr. Ann

    How thin is the blade on your example? Therion's description mentioned a flexible blade, and I am reminded of the thin qaddara's currently used in the Ashura festival.

    Emanuel
    Always check your assumptions...there are no contradictions.
    Get some real news...
    www.informationclearinghouse.info
    www.counterpunch.org
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  7. #7
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    Hi Emanuel,
    It is not particularly flexable. I am wondering if it is a different version/interpretation of a Dhu l-fakar because of the scalloped edges and the notched point. I know it does not look like other ones, but there are so many variations. The back appears to have chiselled designs which may be representing a serpent, while the other side I think has chiselled Koranic inscriptions, as well as the Kofghari. I do like a good mystery!
    Dr. Ann

  8. #8
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    Hi Dr. Ann,
    I've often wondered about these Qadjar pieces with extensive chiselling. Many of the ones I've seen bore hunting scenes, and in every case the blade did not give the impression of a weapon. I thought these may be Persian wall-hangers or at least purely ceremonial pieces. It's true that they vary in shape tremendously - partly what I love about Indo-Persian, SE Asian and African blades...they're wild
    Emanuel
    Always check your assumptions...there are no contradictions.
    Get some real news...
    www.informationclearinghouse.info
    www.counterpunch.org
    http://globalresearch.ca

  9. #9

    Persian influence on India

    Hey Ann,

    Keep in mind that Persia had a very strong influence ojn India, to the extent that Farsi was the language of the Mughal court. Also Persian artisans were brought to work on high quality arms for the nobilty of India.

    This is not to infer that there was not an exremely high level of metalwork available by Indiam artisans, its just the grass is greener on the other side of the fence sometimes. Although the Persian blades had a mush better contrast with the wootz steel they forged.

    So the possibllity of this being an Indian made dagger, styled after a a Persian weapon should be considered a possibilty. We know the Indian artisans has a passion for flambuyont (flames) weapons of which your new aquisition has. Not saying it is, just mentioned the possibilty...

    Another clue would be the metallurgy of the blade. Is it wootz? Does it have contrast? Is it a pattern weld? If a pattern weld was it meant to be etched so the design would show?

    Its very hard to see the style of decoration on the hilt and style of calligraphy on the blade. These can be valuable clues to origen. Different counries had different tastes in design, some prefered a certain flower, some a subdued design, while others the more gaudy the better.

    Where do you think the decoration on this hilt most associates with?

    Dry Roads,

    rand

  10. #10
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    Hi Rand.
    A very small hijacking of this interesting thread (that I'm following avidly).
    <Hijacking mode on>
    I was wondering about your signature. Are you signing "dry roads" because
    you live in the northwest ? Is something is ususally said there ?
    I like it...
    <Hijacking mode off>
    Please forgive my english.

  11. #11

    Dry Roads

    Hello Carlo,

    Am an avid cyclist and saying "dry roads" is similar to saying " may the wind always be at your back" or for a collector, "may you find a treasured sword in an antique dealer umbrella stand".

    Hubba.....

    Dry Roads,

    rand

  12. #12
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    Thanks Rand.
    Last edited by Carlo Giuseppe Tacchini; 07-28-2007 at 04:48 AM. Reason: added emoticon
    Please forgive my english.

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