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Thread: Jake Powning's latest

  1. #1

    Jake Powning's latest

    I don't recall anyone posting this one before... check this out... He had mentioned this sword and the other one to me a while back. I wasn't terribly interested because at the time he was planning on making the fittings out of silver. I do like my swords to be functional even if they will not be used... instead of course he made the fittings of Bronze, which means it's totally functional... and amazing... :blush:



    Better pictures here:

    http://www.powning.com/jake/availabl/availabl.shtml
    Tritonworks Custom Scabbards
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  2. #2
    very cool as usual for J.Powning. I couldn't sleep for anticipation if I had something in the works with that genius.

    Russ can you feel me in regarding your comments on sliver?

  3. #3
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    Thought I'd add another piece of Jake's recent work.. I hope he doesn't mind.

    Called Moon blade, and it's simply stunning. Forged under the light of the full moon, with silver fittings and bog oak, I believe.
    Attached Images Attached Images  
    The smith also sitteth by the anvil,
    And fighteth with the heat of the furnace,
    And the noise of the hammer and the anvil is ever in his ears,
    And his eyes look still upon the pattern of the thing that he maketh.
    He setteth his mind to finish his work,
    And waiteth to polish it perfectly.

  4. #4
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    That is absolutely amazing. Jake never ceases to impress. I wish he had more in stock.

  5. #5
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    That is one of the most gorgeous swords I've seen in a long time! Do you know how the guards and pommel were constructed? Are they castings or carved?

  6. #6
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    That's kinda sexy...

  7. #7
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    Lost wax casting, IIRC. Jake's wax work is some of the best I've seen.

    Josh

    Quote Originally Posted by Chris Lampe View Post
    That is one of the most gorgeous swords I've seen in a long time! Do you know how the guards and pommel were constructed? Are they castings or carved?
    The smith also sitteth by the anvil,
    And fighteth with the heat of the furnace,
    And the noise of the hammer and the anvil is ever in his ears,
    And his eyes look still upon the pattern of the thing that he maketh.
    He setteth his mind to finish his work,
    And waiteth to polish it perfectly.

  8. #8
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    Jake powning

    Jake's stuff is my absolute favorite. wish I had the dough $$$

  9. #9
    Quote Originally Posted by KevinT View Post
    very cool as usual for J.Powning. I couldn't sleep for anticipation if I had something in the works with that genius.

    Russ can you feel me in regarding your comments on sliver?
    Oh sure, nothing to mysterious. I was talking with him about a Viking Style sword and he mentioned that he had a couple on the drawing board and that he intended to make their hilt components out of silver. I believe historically that there were in fact a few silver hilts around but on show pieces, not on battle swords. The metal just isn't durable enough for that sort of thing I suppose. Anyway I prefer my hilt components to be out of something a bit tougher like say steel, iron or.... bronze... dohp! So anyway I didn't really pursue it. If I had would I have wound up with this sword? Maybe. I don't know for SURE that this is even one of the ones Jake was talking about at the time... but it very well could have been.

  10. #10
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    That's gorgeous. Jake has a style that is extremely unique. It's so easy to identify his work even from a quick glance. I appreciate that in an artist. I just really lament the fact that Jake stopped taking commissions a few years ago. The last time I checked his site it still stated that he takes custom orders, but when I contacted him to make a migration era sword for me I was told he no longer worked on commission orders. It seems like there are a lot of fantastic smiths that have dropped out of the custom order scene in the last several years and Jake is one of the best out there. I love his work.
    Jay
    Constant And True

  11. #11
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    You know, I'm normally not into Viking swords, but WOW... that's amazing. I especially enjoyed reading Jake's own words on the creation process. The man's a true artist, no doubt about that.
    Virginia Academy of Fencing Historical Swordsmanship
    --German Longsword & Italian Rapier in the DC Area--


    "A despondent heart will always be defeated regardless of all skill."

  12. #12
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    Truly stunning - Jake's work is on an Art level.
    Bartender and Brewmeister for the Pub


    Stranger in a Strange land

  13. #13
    alloys of silver (like Sterling or Coin) would be fine for fittings. Certainly anything that brass would be acceptable for, silver would be about the same.

    Personally I really like solid silver, with prices being where they are maybe think layered over Iron would be a strong consideration
    Kerry Stagmer
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    Cheap things aren't nice and nice things aren't cheap

  14. #14
    I wouldn't forget either Russ, that hilt fittings (crossguards, etc.) were sometimes made of bone as well which is something some people might call a wall hanger or decorative piece now by the reasoning you used earlier. Silver and less durable materials for hilt fittings might not be practical for 14th and 15th century style combat, but were perfectly acceptable with the way swords were used in battle in the Migration Period and Viking Age.
    Last edited by Derek Estabrook; 07-08-2007 at 04:11 PM.

  15. #15
    Quote Originally Posted by Derek Estabrook View Post
    I wouldn't forget either Russ, that hilt fittings (crossguards, etc.) were sometimes made of bone as well which is something some people might call a wall hanger or decorative piece now by the reasoning you used earlier. Silver and less durable materials for hilt fittings might not be practical for 14th and 15th century style combat, but were perfectly acceptable with the way swords were used in battle in the Migration Period and Viking Age.
    Perhaps so, but I still prefer my fittings out of something a bit more durable, not something prone to shattering (bone) or deforming (silver) on impact. It's really moot, since I'm not planning on ever using a sword in a fight, but there you have it still, it's the same reason I collect functional swords, no use for them whatsoever, but there's just something about knowing that they could be used. You may well be right about the fighting style used at the time such a sword would have been the norm (although I don't know that we really know enough about fighting at the time to say definitively) but you can't really count on someone to know what sort of fighting style they are supposed to be using in order to preserve the sword.
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  16. #16
    Quote Originally Posted by Kerry Stagmer View Post
    alloys of silver (like Sterling or Coin) would be fine for fittings. Certainly anything that brass would be acceptable for, silver would be about the same.

    Personally I really like solid silver, with prices being where they are maybe think layered over Iron would be a strong consideration
    Intersting, I would have thought that sterling would have been too brittle to take any serious impact in that sort of size. I personally don't care for brass for fittings either (preferring bronze) although I know it has been used. Do you have any sort of data or just personal experience with the sort of impacts that silver alloys can take? I'd love to hear about it.
    Last edited by Russ Ellis; 07-08-2007 at 10:20 PM.
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  17. #17
    I thought you figured it too soft, as I assume cast copper and silver alloys are coming out of the moulds soft, so perhaps bronzes were a couple of degrees harder than silver. (?)

    Silver can be heat treated. I assume, just like copper bronze cannot be. Perhaps then silver may be even be better as a cast object.(?)

    So when one does a cast mounting like this do you make some accomodations to work harden the contact areas?


    Another sort of amazing thing with Jake is not only the carving, but carving in figured wood

  18. #18
    Mind that the original pommels were quite certainly all made of soft iron (as were the majority of blades b.t.w), definately not hardened steel, considering the rarity and cost of that material. Iron is quite a bit softer then cast bronze, and only slightly harder then copper. With the shapes of the pommels and guards, they're definately not going to bend on impact. You could get cut marks in them, but if that's the case, you'd quite likely have cut marks in your hands as well. So I don't think they'd have really bothered by what material they chose for the pommel and guard in that respect.

  19. #19
    Quote Originally Posted by Jeroen Zuiderwijk View Post
    Mind that the original pommels were quite certainly all made of soft iron (as were the majority of blades b.t.w), definately not hardened steel, considering the rarity and cost of that material. Iron is quite a bit softer then cast bronze, and only slightly harder then copper. With the shapes of the pommels and guards, they're definately not going to bend on impact. You could get cut marks in them, but if that's the case, you'd quite likely have cut marks in your hands as well. So I don't think they'd have really bothered by what material they chose for the pommel and guard in that respect.
    Sure, but how does iron compare to unalloyed (or alloyed for that matter) silver? I have always assumed that silver (unalloyed) is going to softer then iron and that silver (alloyed) is going to be more brittle. If I am wrong on that, it won't be the first time. I'm all about the phosphor bronze fittings (hence my bewailing not continuing talking to Jake about the swords he had on the drawing board at the time) but was not sold on silver fittings.
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  20. #20
    Quote Originally Posted by Russ Ellis View Post
    Sure, but how does iron compare to unalloyed (or alloyed for that matter) silver? I have always assumed that silver (unalloyed) is going to softer then iron and that silver (alloyed) is going to be more brittle.
    Depends on how much you alloy it. Yeah, silver unalloyed is very soft, but you can make it harder by adding some copper f.e. How hard it gets I don't know, but I know they used silver weapons in the middle-east during the bronze age (spearheads f.e.), so at least it was hard enough for that.

  21. #21
    Quote Originally Posted by Jeroen Zuiderwijk View Post
    How hard it gets I don't know, but I know they used silver weapons in the middle-east during the bronze age (spearheads f.e.), so at least it was hard enough for that.
    Fascinating! Silver spear heads??!?? ... well I've learned my thing for the day do you think my boss will let me go home now with it being 8a.m. and all??? I don't know if Jake at the time was planning on using silver alloy or what. Heck perhaps he still is...
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  22. #22
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    I am still trying to figure out just how Patrick Barta silver plates the hilt and guard of his Abingdon sword other than the "cheap" electroplating that he uses on the base model. Russ or anyone else, do you have any ideas? He says that he applies silver plates and then engraves them as was done on the original, but I cannot see how.
    Trying to walk in the Light, Hugh
    See 1 John 1:5

  23. #23
    Quote Originally Posted by Hugh Fuller View Post
    I am still trying to figure out just how Patrick Barta silver plates the hilt and guard of his Abingdon sword other than the "cheap" electroplating that he uses on the base model. Russ or anyone else, do you have any ideas? He says that he applies silver plates and then engraves them as was done on the original, but I cannot see how.
    Hey Hugh,

    I can't comment upon how Patrick does his directly, but if he does in fact do it like they were originally done (and I have no reason to doubt that he does), the method as I understand it was to do the incising of the pomel with whatever the design is to be (often much simpler geometric designs) and then taking very thin sheets of silver and/or copper and hammering them into the incisions. The incisions were often cut in a "dovetail" like manner to "lock" the silver plates into place. I expect that this is a very time consuming not to mention technically challenging process.
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  24. #24
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    That certainly would explain the additional price of 400 Euros. Now, how would one go about engraving or etching the design into the resulting silver plate?
    Trying to walk in the Light, Hugh
    See 1 John 1:5

  25. #25
    Quote Originally Posted by Hugh Fuller View Post
    That certainly would explain the additional price of 400 Euros. Now, how would one go about engraving or etching the design into the resulting silver plate?
    I believe (and we are quickly approaching the limits of my memory on the subject) that the design is actually in the underlying metal and the plates are hammered into the design, that is when the plates are hammered into place the "engraving" is done. If I recall correctly I got this information out of Pierce's book Swords in the Viking Age, I will send myself a note to look it up again tonight.
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