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Thread: Pommel Peening

  1. #1
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    Pommel Peening

    Hello Everybody,

    I have a question on peening a tang onto the pommel.

    How do I get the handle to stop moving and shifting? And, what's a good size of tang left over before I start peening?
    Pi R Squared, no...Pie R round, cornbread R squared.

  2. #2
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    The grip can be bedded and adhered onto the tang with epoxy, rifle bedding compound, or some type of resin. This will usually make it permanent, you will have to split it to remove it.
    Alternately you can glue thin wooden shims inside the grip to make it tight.
    I like to anneal the end of the tang before cold peening and try not to peen too much or you may get cracks. This means fairly little material sticking out before peening, maybe 1/16" to 1/8". Hot peening will allow you to work the steel much more without cracking it so you can make a much bigger peen.
    This depends on the steel, some swords have a mild steel tang welded on to make peening or threading easier. High carbon steel is trickier to work cold. Either way it dosen't improve the tang any to beat it too aggressively. If you over-peen you may crack the grip. Upsetting the tang inside the pommel itself will make any future removal very troublesome so light hammers with smaller, rounded striking surfaces (ball peen) work best.
    Justin King

    just killing time until my next bad idea....

  3. #3
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    thanks for the reply,

    my other question is...this is a very labor intensive process.

    i feel like im doing something wrong, as i've been hammering on the bottom of the tang and pommel for a solid 4 hours, and it doesn't look like its budged.

    i started with 1/8'' of tang over the pommel.

    what about...welding the tang directly to the pommel? is that a taboo, or destorys any structural integrity of the tang?
    Last edited by Wu Tuan; 08-25-2007 at 04:53 PM.
    Pi R Squared, no...Pie R round, cornbread R squared.

  4. #4
    Join Date
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    Shouldn't take anywhere near 4 hours of hammering. It is a relatively quick process normally, though I tend to take mine slow and careful...

    It sounds like you either have a tang that is too hard on the end to move much or you work hardened it with the hammering. My thought is you could take it all loose, and heat the tang end up and give it a try to soften it a bit again and relieve any stress you've built up.

    Hot peening would be a good way to go if the handle were being built of slabs and put on after the pommel....

    Not sure what to advise about the welding, I haven't done that to any blades myself...

  5. #5
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    never mind
    Last edited by Glen C.; 08-25-2007 at 06:50 PM.

  6. #6
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    thanks for your replies.

    but...i have a very stubborn tang, and i doubt its hardened because my toy dremel was able to cut through it relatively easily.

    id like to ask again if anybody knows how welding the tang to the pommel will work?
    Pi R Squared, no...Pie R round, cornbread R squared.

  7. #7
    Welding can work, but I'd avoid it if the whole thing isn't welded. If your guard or grip starts to come loose and your pommel is welded, there isn't a good way to fix it. That's why when Starfire, Baltimore Knife and Sword, or some of those other companies do welded pommels, they also have welded guards and just leather wrapped grips, for the most part.

    Peening isn't just hammering; not sure what you know or don't and I don't want to sound patronizing or anything, so skip this if you feel you already know what you're doing... but it's actually moving the metal to the sides, not just trying to mash it all down flat. You need to have the sword properly held so that it won't budge (hammer it all you like and it's not going to accomplish a thing if you're just holding it between your legs or something) and so the tip isn't getting hammered into the floor with each blow. You need to use a ball peen hammer or other rounded head hammer, not a flat claw hammer kinda thing.

    I'll be honest, I've not peened a sword tang from scratch, just tried to tighten up some of my del Tins. On the other hand, it's basically the same process with peening rivets when making armor, and that I have done. Still have them go sideways on me occasionally, but I'm getting better.
    Freelance hack... and slash... and thrust...

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