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Thread: Tempering(please help!)

  1. #1
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    Tempering(please help!)

    Hello, once again(duh ) i am in a jam. I am going to forge very soon, but i have not a way to temper the steel. The reason, is because i have talked to many people who say different things about the process. It is annoying!! do this, do that.....lol, the point is, i now want to speak with all of you on the matter

    Hope you guys can help

    Thank You!

  2. #2
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    If you have a forge, then you have a way to temper. Though that method is likely less than ideal. But, it does depend on what you are making and what you want it to come out like, with what characteristics. A kitchen oven may be used for tempering if it is monitored for temperature consistency, though it may not hold a lot. Wally Hayes, in his tactical katana making video tempers his kat by sticking it in the oven and letting the excess stick out the front of the door, blocking off the gaps as best he could... So, there are lots of things you *could* do...

    Ofcourse, it would help to know exactly what it is you need to know about it...

  3. #3
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    Of course tempering times may need adjusting when using fan assisted ovens
    Careful thought, consideration & communication is well worth the effort and end result.

  4. #4
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    Geese, once more, i forgot to say what i was going to make

    A basic straight edge knife, varying from maybe a 4 to 8 inch blade, around that area. I am making them of bumper springs! Go 9260 steel!

    heh

  5. #5
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    Forge, grind, heat to non magnetic and a little over evenly along the length of the blade, quench in oil, throw in toaster oven or household oven at 450 for an hour.
    I dunno. Iron is sort-of the Paris Hilton of metals, and carbon, nickel, chromium silicon, etc. are a bunch of good looking guys she just met at a party. - Al Massey

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sam Salvati View Post
    Forge, grind, heat to non magnetic and a little over evenly along the length of the blade, quench in oil, throw in toaster oven or household oven at 450 for an hour.
    It is that simple? Thank you so much man!

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sam Salvati View Post
    Forge, grind, heat to non magnetic and a little over evenly along the length of the blade, quench in oil, throw in toaster oven or household oven at 450 for an hour.
    Wait, i heard that you have to temper more than once, is that true?? It is great that people are shedding light on this dull situation

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by sal v. View Post
    It is that simple? Thank you so much man!
    No it's not that simple hehe.
    I dunno. Iron is sort-of the Paris Hilton of metals, and carbon, nickel, chromium silicon, etc. are a bunch of good looking guys she just met at a party. - Al Massey

  9. #9
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    Simple steel - temper once , the more complex the steel go twice or three times.
    Ascertained with certainty

  10. #10
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    So, i temper more than once, so what is in between?

    i forge it,belt sand it(grind, whatever ) heat past critical temp to harden. then what? seeing how i am doing this with 9260 steel

  11. #11
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    For 9260 you could temper just once .If you want to temper twice [btw 2 hours for each temper] just cool to room temperature between tempers.
    Ascertained with certainty

  12. #12
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    I sees, it sounds simple, when you get to the process itself, it is not that simple...or at least, you know what i mean...

  13. #13
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    If it's only a knife I'd say go ahead and try it. You'll probably find out pretty quickly if it's gone bad and the cost for a blade like that shouldn't be too great.

    Myself, I'm a great fan of trial-and-error so that's how I'll do it once I get my forge running. I wanna try tempering in the oven as well as in the forge!
    Beauty is a pattern

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Christian Borg View Post
    If it's only a knife I'd say go ahead and try it. You'll probably find out pretty quickly if it's gone bad and the cost for a blade like that shouldn't be too great.

    Myself, I'm a great fan of trial-and-error so that's how I'll do it once I get my forge running. I wanna try tempering in the oven as well as in the forge!
    I know right? It is not like i am making an L6 katana, no pressure!

  15. #15
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    Another option is an electric deep fryer and peanut oil. Always nice to have a thermometer on hand to check for consistency. I found while using this method, before I built a bigger electronic oil tank, there were fewer hot spots than in the oven, smells good and can be used as a direct quenchant.

    Good luck
    Stand and deliver!! - Carl

  16. #16
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    Now that's what I'm talking about, Sal. One do what one gotta do and then fix the problems, if there are any.

    Good luck! I'm a bit envious since all I miss for my own forge are heat-proof bricks.
    Beauty is a pattern

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Christian Borg View Post
    Now that's what I'm talking about, Sal. One do what one gotta do and then fix the problems, if there are any.

    Good luck! I'm a bit envious since all I miss for my own forge are heat-proof bricks.
    Heh, hey, thanks for all the help that you have given me, you have no idea how much it means to me!

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Andrew Harrington View Post
    Another option is an electric deep fryer and peanut oil. Always nice to have a thermometer on hand to check for consistency. I found while using this method, before I built a bigger electronic oil tank, there were fewer hot spots than in the oven, smells good and can be used as a direct quenchant.

    Good luck
    Haha, thanks for the advice man, but i am horribly allergic, even to the smell of peanuts! i literally have a heart attack!

  19. #19
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    Well, we're all in deep to this addiction. Next day you'll help me!
    Beauty is a pattern

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by Christian Borg View Post
    Well, we're all in deep to this addiction. Next day you'll help me!
    Haha, maybe! Thanks for all the help everyone, this takes so much off my shoulders!

  21. #21
    Here is a heat treating article I wrote for my website. It's pretty simple and straight forward.
    http://www.macabeeknives.com/articles/heattreat.html
    Adlai
    Macabee Knives
    There are no mistakes in bladesmithing only design modifications.
    http://www.macabeeknives.com

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by Adlai Stein View Post
    Here is a heat treating article I wrote for my website. It's pretty simple and straight forward.
    http://www.macabeeknives.com/articles/heattreat.html
    Thank you very much, excellent stuff right here. I really want to make
    this my career, nothing i want to do other than forging, Especially seeing how steel in New York, not a problem. Me and my friend recently took a Steel shopping cart it was just sitting there, we needed to do something with it, Haha.

  23. #23
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    Nevermind.
    Last edited by Sam Salvati; 09-26-2007 at 08:12 PM.
    I dunno. Iron is sort-of the Paris Hilton of metals, and carbon, nickel, chromium silicon, etc. are a bunch of good looking guys she just met at a party. - Al Massey

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sam Salvati View Post
    You just didn't listen did you.
    And that means What exactly? I took your advice, this thread was not meant to be preachy if that is what you are going for...

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