Results 1 to 14 of 14

Thread: "Glue" used on or in the hilts of swords

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Fayetteville North Carolina
    Posts
    6,846

    "Glue" used on or in the hilts of swords

    In many of the swords I have from the middle east the hilt and blade are attached to each other by a glue with out pins.

    I was wondering if any one has formulas to make this glue or just ideas of what it might be. and how it was applied.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    An Englishman abroad
    Posts
    3,273
    Indian blades used pitch or Pine resin I think.

    You could get some of that crazy blood sap from Jerry!
    Bartender and Brewmeister for the Pub


    Stranger in a Strange land

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Western Australia
    Posts
    494
    Alot of people seem to use hidden pins, using short pins which dowel the scales to the tang, but don't break the surface of the scales. Epoxy seems to be the most often recommended glue for that method.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Fayetteville North Carolina
    Posts
    6,846
    some are pinned
    here is the thing, i bought a antique hilt to replace a hilt on a sword and it is full of this 'glue' no pins and even using a hammer and chisel this stuff does not break or break down with penetrating oil

    its black, solid and resilient to breakage

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Western Australia
    Posts
    494
    mmm. magic glue. Needs to get me some !
    Have you tried heat?

  6. #6
    I've heard that it was based on mastic, a type of resin. However, mastic purely is very brittle (I've got some), so it's not the only ingredient. I know that mixing in animal fat reduces the brittleness in resins. But as for the exact recipe, I really wish I knew! It's brilliant stuff, and I could really use it myself.

    N.b. with regard to resins, mind that there is a huge difference between different resins, depending on which tree they're from and how they're extracted. Some resins are liquid, others gummy and sticky, others really hard and brittle, some soft and brittle etc. etc. Resin becomes soft or even liquid when heated. It can also be dissolved in alcohol or lineseed oil, but then it has to be ground fine and it takes hours or days (when unheated). But these swords where set by melting the resin.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Fayetteville North Carolina
    Posts
    6,846
    Good Morning Jeroen

    I could send you a sample, LOL

    I sprayed this down with a very aggressive penetrating oil which did nothing. I will try alcohol next, I do not want to apply heat, there is some silver left on the hilt and I am worried about damaging that. the stuff is thick as well pointing to a much thinner tang. It is very solid and does not chip or shatter even under medium hammer and chisel blows which is as aggressive as I have gotten with it.

  8. #8

    Angry

    Quote Originally Posted by David Lewis Smith View Post
    Good Morning Jeroen

    I could send you a sample, LOL
    I could use a sample of roughly 1kg :P

    I sprayed this down with a very aggressive penetrating oil which did nothing. I will try alcohol next,
    I don't think it will do much, unless the resin is already ground.

    I do not want to apply heat, there is some silver left on the hilt and I am worried about damaging that.
    You shouldn't have to heat it over 200C, so the silver doesn't suffer from that (melting point 960C).

    the stuff is thick as well pointing to a much thinner tang. It is very solid and does not chip or shatter even under medium hammer and chisel blows which is as aggressive as I have gotten with it.
    That's why I want the recipe

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Fayetteville North Carolina
    Posts
    6,846
    I will see what I can do,
    not sure who I would send this to to have it broken down though

    maybe a collage forensics class

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    1,121
    David,

    I have read that the resin used is near impossible to dislodge one set except by heating (boiling) the hilt and allowing the resin to float out and off of the metal--I don't think even the modern Indian manufacturers of traditional styled hilts have the secret to the resin and they use modern glues. I think you are correct in noting that some hilts were pinned (through the langets or grips) as well as being affixed to the blade by the resin--I have one such tulwar with a pin through the langets and blade. Sorry you are having so much trouble, but your efforts do demonstrate the sureness of the affixing method by resin and is a "lesson" for all of us.
    Tom Donoho

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Fayetteville North Carolina
    Posts
    6,846
    Quote Originally Posted by T. Donoho View Post
    David,

    I have read that the resin used is near impossible to dislodge one set except by heating (boiling) the hilt and allowing the resin to float out and off of the metal--I don't think even the modern Indian manufacturers of traditional styled hilts have the secret to the resin and they use modern glues. I think you are correct in noting that some hilts were pinned (through the langets or grips) as well as being affixed to the blade by the resin--I have one such tulwar with a pin through the langets and blade. Sorry you are having so much trouble, but your efforts do demonstrate the sureness of the affixing method by resin and is a "lesson" for all of us.
    You just gave me an idea!
    Instead of getting rid of the resin, i could reheat and than reuse it

  12. #12
    Quote Originally Posted by David Lewis Smith View Post
    In many of the swords I have from the middle east the hilt and blade are attached to each other by a glue with out pins.

    I was wondering if any one has formulas to make this glue or just ideas of what it might be. and how it was applied.
    From a small Greek island there is a natural gum that is created by a special tree there called Mastic, my spelling may be wrong, but this is what you are looking for.

    rand

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Fayetteville North Carolina
    Posts
    6,846
    thanks rand, that is enough to go on

    is there anything added to it?

  14. #14

    Mastic

    Do not have more information to add to that, but it is still available. Good luck on your quest...

    rand

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •